Bebop scales


Christoph
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Anyone know of a good site with all the bebop scales?

# 1
chris mood
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no...but bebop scales are easy to create, you just basically connect the chord tones with chromatics.
Here's a popular one, bebop Mixolydian (C)
C D E F G A Bb B C
You could do the same thing with this scale from root to 3rd, or 3rd to 5th
R-3
C (Db) D D# E F G A Bb C / the Db would be optional
3-5
C D E F F# G A Bb C

Do the same thing noted above with any of the modes.
# 2
Christoph
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Yeah, I know they're just modes with an added note.

I'm a visually-oriented person though, and I like to see fretboard patterns. (like on wholenote.com, except they don't have bebop!!!)


# 3
chris mood
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Looks like you'll have to do it the old fashion way and chart them out yourself. :(
# 4
Christoph
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Doh! . . . that sucks.

I guess I've become spoiled by this modern age of technology.


# 5
chris mood
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you should create a program where you can type in the notes of the scale and it highlights on the diagram of the neck.


# 6
Christoph
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Hmmmm . . . perhaps I shall.



# 7
chris mood
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you are ONE ODD DUDE....
so are they your original pictures?
# 8
Christoph
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LOL . . . yeah, photography is one of my many hobbies.

So are you one of the procrastinators?


# 9
chris mood
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you could say that.:)
# 10
Number of the Beast
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Originally posted by Christoph

Doh! . . . that sucks.

I guess I've become spoiled by this modern age of technology.



I think we all are spoiled. I feel like a professional chef who makes Kraft easy mac whenever I do things myself. DARN YOU TECHNOLOGYYYYYYY!!!!!
If I could be a solo...I think I'd be Eruption...
# 11
griphon2
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Joined: 08/14/02
Posts: 297
Bebop scales, per se, are a misnomer. This particular idea is based upon harmony, progressions, and many other intangibles. Thus, the options become ad infinitum. It is essentially based upon what you know (and can learn) and technique. Bebop is much like a choreographed dance piece.
x=x, depending; on a lot of variables, forseen and/or unforseen. Knowledge, technique, experience and at times, pure balls, make what you improvise, what you say. Bebop will not happen in a vacuum. x must exist.
A lie goes around the world before the truth gets it's shoes on. (Mark Twain)
# 12
chris mood
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He Returns......:)
# 13
noticingthemistake
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Bebop I think was the first true rebellion in music, but it was an envitable change. Music was going to have to evolve and it did from jazz, to swing, to Bebop. Take one great artist, Lester Young, who always pushed the boundaries of his time by lenghten a note over measure while soloing. Something unheard of at the time, and believe he got some sh*t for it. Then of course you got Charlie Parker, who was influenced by Young and in my opinion he was the genius behind bebop. He always found new and interesting ways to play over very familiar chord progression, like 12-bar blues but kept the solo from repeating or having it become too rote. If your really into bebop check out the Savoy and Dial Recordings that were done in the early 40's. I believe Miles Davis was also on that with Parker, another great bop artist. It's something you have to hear and experience yourself to understand. You'll learn alot if you do but one thing above all is to be inventive, and try to think outside of the mechanical world of "scales". That basically what Bebop is.
"My whole life is a dark room...ONE BIG DARK ROOM" - a.f.i.
# 14
chris mood
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Most likely it is Dizzy Gillespie on the recordings, Miles didn't play w/Parker all that long and I don't believe he is featured on more then 1 or 2 recordings.

Bebop is above all a musical language, just like Blues and Flamenco....music that was created on the streets w/its own set of rules and theories. Unless you grew up listening too and surrounded by a lot of jazz, bebop can take a long time to comprehend and play authentically.

Bebop is not about playing major scales over top of chord progressions, but approaching each chord as its own identity and utilizing all 12 tones in a manner that makes sense theoretically and to the ear. Add to that break neck tempos that don't exist on most metronomes, extended phrasing and syncopation, and you start to get the basic concept (musical olympics). It is hard to master in one lifetime, but having a basic ability of the genre will free up your playing tremendously.
# 15
noticingthemistake
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Yeah he was on there too along with many other good musicians. Here's a editorial review I found on the recordings.


Charlie "Bird" Parker's perfect attack on alto saxophone, along with his crystal-clear phrasing and high-velocity improvisations, made him one of the 20th century's most imitated musicians. This eight-CD set, which represents the best remastering of Parker's fertile Dial and Savoy sides to date, was produced by veteran producer Orrin Keepnews. It includes the legendary roundtable of bebop knights: trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis; bassists Curly Russell and Tommy Potter; drummer Max Roach; and pianists Bud Powell, Duke Jordan, and John Lewis.

Disc 1 begins with Parker as a sideman for guitarist Tiny Grimes, which yielded the pre-bop jump-blues sides "Tiny's Tempo" and "Romance Without Finance." The other tracks are first-generation bop classics: "Groovin' High," "Salt Peanuts," "Koko," and "Hot House." The remaining seven discs feature Bird's genius in other musical dimensions. Bird's recompositions of the standards "All the Things You Are," "Whispering," and "Embraceable You" stand out, as do the zesty "Barbados," "Bongo Bop," and "Night in Tunisia" (with the famous alto break). Underrated baritone Earl Coleman sings the ebony-embered ballad "Dark Shadows." But above all, Bird was a blues player. Nothing illustrates this better than the memorable blues ballad "Parker's Mood," on which his soulful, wailing alto is matched by John Lewis's rich, lyrical accompaniment. These tracks contain other gems, including a young and nervous Miles Davis sputtering Fats Navarro-style trumpet solos on "Milestones" and "Now's the Time," with Gillespie playing piano. Although he died at the age of 34 in 1955, Parker, along with Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk, formed the Holy Trinity that created bebop, and this set is Bird flying high. --Eugene Holley Jr.


Another person worth checking out is Earl "father" Hines. Awesome and innovative jazz pianist! Parker and Gillespie played along his side too.

Studying Bebop is a great way to train yourself to think musically.

[Edited by noticingthemistake on 09-14-2003 at 12:36 PM]
"My whole life is a dark room...ONE BIG DARK ROOM" - a.f.i.
# 16
u10ajf
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Joined: 10/31/01
Posts: 611
Guys! I can't believe nobody has mentioned the fretboard mapper at
http://www.power-chord.com/gaff/mapper/
you can input your own scale formulas too.
If you are looking for some funky new scales then take a look at my website, I compiled a load from books. My page needs updating, I think there are about 40 different scale forms (no modes) and they are tabulated in terms of how many notes they can have in common with each other if their root notes are optimally arranged. it's on my brother's website, go to "Friends" and then to "Andrew F".
http://www.classaxe.com



If I couldn't laugh at myself how could I laugh at someone less ridiculous?
# 17
Christoph
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You are the man! That was exactly what I was looking for.


# 18
griphon2
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Interesting. Nothing happens without honest work. If one thinks for a moment, this is easy, think twice and be a baker (same amount of work). There might be something behind door number 3, or whatever.

He's back. I want no fight. Just listen.

[Edited by griphon2 on 09-30-2003 at 08:31 PM]
A lie goes around the world before the truth gets it's shoes on. (Mark Twain)
# 19
chris mood
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by griphon2
[B] Nothing happens without honest work. If one thinks for a moment, this is easy, think twice and be a baker (same amount of work).
Your right, to be proficient on your instrument takes a lifetime of dedication. Unfortunately it seems most younger musicians don't care about being good players, instead are caught up in Rock Star stardom. I yearn for the day to see another "pop" act that is as honest with their music and intentions as Steely Dan or Yes. I doubt most guitarists these days (playing new rock) can even identify what chord their playing. Damn the idoit who taught these bastards drop D tuning.

He's back. I want no fight. Just listen.


There's nothing wrong with a good debate, those were some of my favorite threads. Being able to debate stuff intellectually is what makes us humans. Christoph and Educated Film used to have some heavy ones in the Open Discussion forum, I enjoyed those also.
# 20