Books, authors, genres, etc...


grizzlymint
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grizzlymint
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07/02/2007 1:14 am
I enjoy reading, though I hardly ever do it. I enjoyed my high school and college literature classes, so I figured I should start doing it. Books often have an impact on me and make me think. (Well written ones anyways.)

I don't think I've read anything in its entirety since high school, other than a scientific book about Creation vs. Evolution last year (and a bunch of short stories). I really haven't read any novel in its entirety since high school, where we read books such as "A Seperate Peace", "The Great Gatsby", "Of Mice and Men", etc. I enjoyed all of them thoroughly.

So this weekend I picked up a couple. I bought "A Clockwork Orange" (whoever wrote it slips my mind at the moment, but I'm sure we've all heard of it through the movie or book) and "East of Eden" by Steinbeck.

I'm gonna sift through the library soon here and try to find some others. Any recommendations? I like books that make you feel like you've been punched in the gut afterwards, lots of irony and social issues. That type of thing.

What are your favorites and recommend anything you think I should read.
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 1
Weslaba
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Weslaba
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07/02/2007 1:19 am
I wish I could get more into books. The ones I end up actually finishing I love, but ufortunately thats been hard to come by. I maybe completed one of the required books for this year and I think that was the Shakespeare one we basically read all in class. It's a real shame, and I wish it wasn't true, but what can you do? Well, apparently... rhyme. :D
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Kevin Taylor
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Kevin Taylor
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07/02/2007 3:09 am
If you're into science fiction at all try out Ray Bradbury & Issaac Asimov.
Martian Chronicles, Farenheit 451, I Robot.. lot's of social commentary and food for thought.
# 3
grizzlymint
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grizzlymint
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07/02/2007 3:32 am
I read Fahrenheit 451 back in the day and enjoyed it. I'm not sure if sci-fi is my thing though. When I start to burn other stuff out, I might give it a throw.
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 4
jiujitsu_jesus
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jiujitsu_jesus
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07/02/2007 6:43 am
In all seriousness - check out Don Quixote. I'm reading it at the moment, and I'll just say there's a reason Salman Rushdie called it the greatest novel ever written at one stage. It's thicker than a paving slab - I'm not expecting to finish it this year! - but every word in it is gold. If you get the full version, you'll also get Tobias Smollett(the original translator)'s "Life of Cervantes" at the front, which is fascinating; and the Modern Library Classics version has a really good introduction by Carlos Fuentes.

And if you like or are interested in fantasy, have a look at Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series. It's cheesy in parts, but it's damn well-written and it's got a brain.
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Krunek
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Krunek
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07/02/2007 7:30 am
Now here is an issue I can contribute to... I enjoy reading. Stayed up plenty of nights doing so. I read anything I can get my hands on. Of course, like everyone, I too have my favourite genre. Dungeons&Dragons. Here I recommend George R.R. Martin, Guy Gavriel Kay. Of course, Tolkien... The Forgoten realms saga is great stuff. As for Don Quijote (or whatever the heck you write it), by all means. Ray Bradbury doesn"t imapct me much, but Isaac Asimov is good... Of course, in that genre, you HAVE to read Jules Verne...In his time, the stuff he was writting about was science fiction. Clockwork orange will make an impression on you... Nyhowz, bare in mind, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Read everything. I have read Bible, Mein Kampf (by Hitler), Stephen King, Michael Crichton, Adam Smith(yeah, yeah, I know).
And I vas never sorry about it. It is good to read. For the last thought, I would recommend The tribe of cave bear... That is at least what it"s called in Croatia. Jean M. Aluel.
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Fret spider
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07/02/2007 10:31 am
its called clan of the cave bear in the uk. if ur gonna read it u might as well read the others in the series too. there like 5 books. personally i am a fantassy man.

i do like theweel of time series buy robert jordan. other good writers are gearge rr martin, raymond fiest, david gemmel, david edings (are a bit cheasy at times). and many others.
# 7
Kevin Taylor
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07/02/2007 11:00 am
Originally Posted by: Fret spiderits called clan of the cave bear in the uk.


Skip the movie with Darrel Hannah tho... major suckfest.
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ChristopherSchlegel
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07/02/2007 1:33 pm
Originally Posted by: grizzlymint
What are your favorites and recommend anything you think I should read.

My favorite novel is "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand. I recommend it to everyone.
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clewnii
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clewnii
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07/02/2007 6:18 pm
Philip K Dick ! =)

or

Just a Couple of Day's by Tony Vigorito

hmm or

Neil Gaiman Check out "Stardust" and "American Gods"

The ending of Stardust can make grown men weep ;P
# 10
da_ardvark
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da_ardvark
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07/02/2007 7:06 pm
Originally Posted by: CSchlegelMy favorite novel is "The Fountainhead" by Ayn Rand. I recommend it to everyone.


No doubt a great novel, but I still prefer Atlas Shrugged.
# 11
da_ardvark
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da_ardvark
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07/02/2007 7:25 pm
I recommend the following.

Jem by Frederick Pohl (Sci Fi)
A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M Miller Jr. (Apocalyptic)
The Book of the Dun Cow by Walter Wangerin (Fantasy)
The Trial by Franz Kafka (Fiction)
The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (Fiction)
Artillary Attacks by Edwin Rommel (Non-Fiction)
The Innocent Man by John Grisham (Non Fiction)
# 12
R. Shackleferd
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07/03/2007 4:51 am
The Sea Wolf by Jack London has a tremendously imposing yet tragic antagonist character pitted against the weakling main character, taking place on a ship. It features some of the usual ocean going ventures of violence and mutiny, weather and shipwrecks, but with looks at morality, value of life (or lack thereof), and conditioning and adaptation among others, that are all illustrated as eloquently as London does. Likely every library has this one.

And since Sci-fi was brought up, no list, however brief, is complete without some Arthur C. Clarke. There's a huge amount in his bibliography; well over 50 years worth and still counting. He imagines well with grand scales and themes yet focuses on the well developed individual characters and plot. Again, common in libraries.

And for most casual reading, I've dug into quite a few Louis L'Amour. Usually short novels good for the historic settings, action, and overall style spanning centuries of uniquely American history. I'd agree his title fits...America's Storyteller.
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Krunek
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07/03/2007 10:28 am
Originally Posted by: Fret spiderits called clan of the cave bear in the uk. if ur gonna read it u might as well read the others in the series too. there like 5 books. personally i am a fantassy man.

i do like theweel of time series buy robert jordan. other good writers are gearge rr martin, raymond fiest, david gemmel, david edings (are a bit cheasy at times). and many others.


Hmmm... No offense, but the later ones, in my humble opinion are a pile of poo. They re commercialized... it is just written for the money. The first one is great, but later ones, dissapointment. But as for other authors, I must congratulate you on your taste...
I noticed someone Kafka above... Hmmm... if that would be your first encounter with that kind of literature, you might find it boring... Try Turgenjev for a start. And, BY ALL MEANS, read Harry Potter. Trust me, fellas. I do know a good deal about books... This Potter stuff is really good. Try it. I really liked it. ;)
# 14
GuitarPsy
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07/03/2007 12:33 pm
I've been thinking to read more as well, I'm into Sci-fi as long as it stays connected to reality instead of making up all sorts of flashy stuff, and enjoy most Fantasy, I've just finished Raymond E. Feist's 'Magician: Apprentice' and 'Magician: Master' and really enjoyed it

there's one book called Deus Ex Machina written by Pierre Ouellette that I can't forget, it's fascinating on how deep it travels into the science of DNA and computers, but keeping it relatively easy to understand for someone like me
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adevotedone
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adevotedone
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07/03/2007 3:40 pm
Hello, All

OK, feel free to ridicule me to death on this one!!! :)

My All-time fave: The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. I've read them 7 times in the last 20 years, and there are still passages that move me to tears. Wonderful books.

Some honorable mentions:

The Harry Potter Books. Easy reads, lots of fun, and well written. Great for when you want to enjoy the read and not have to think about the social commentary too much.

The Eragon Books (Eragon, Eldest) Again, great reads, I was unable to put them down, much to my wife's consternation (actually, she just waited until I finished and said, "so, now I get my husband back).

For Whom the Bell Tolls by Hemmingway.

Since you mentioned the Creation Evolution book, would you happen to be a Christian? If so, there are a few Christian Authors you may want to check out:

Frank Peretti (The Oath, Piercing the Darkness, Another "the Darkness book that I'm not remembering right now, The Visitation, et. Al.) Fantastic suspense/thrillers, in the vein of Stephen King.

Ted Dekker (Thr3e (an amazing book, the ending will completely floor you), Black, Red and White (a trilogy) et. al)

Randy Alcorn (Dominion, Deadline (crime fiction), The Edge of Eternity (guarenteed to entertain, move you to tears, inspire, and make you think all at the same time, Safely Home (will get you VERY interested in taking a hard look at China).

Well, hope this helps. I'd love to hear some comments from anyone whose read any of these.

Finally, I'd love to know the the title of the Creation/Evolution book that you read. I'm getting interested in studying (on personal time) some apologetics, and I'm not sure if I go for a literal 7-day creation, but would love to read some of the evidence both ways. I know enough about Evolution to know that it is impossible as a theory of origins without the Divine Hand, but don't know much about the alternatives. I would suggest Hugh Ross as a resource for you if you are interested in the origins debate, I haven't read him, but I've heard his name quite a bit, and he is very respected (I believe he takes a gap theory perspective)

Well, that's about it. I look forward to comments.
Peace,
Tom
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Leedogg
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07/03/2007 7:54 pm

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earthman buck
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earthman buck
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07/03/2007 9:31 pm
Anything at all by Kurt Vonnegut (you might want to start with the classics like Slaughterhouse-Five or Breakfast of Champions).

You will like it. If you don't, I'll give you your money back.
# 18
grizzlymint
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07/04/2007 12:51 am
Originally Posted by: adevotedone
Finally, I'd love to know the the title of the Creation/Evolution book that you read. I'm getting interested in studying (on personal time) some apologetics, and I'm not sure if I go for a literal 7-day creation, but would love to read some of the evidence both ways. I know enough about Evolution to know that it is impossible as a theory of origins without the Divine Hand, but don't know much about the alternatives. I would suggest Hugh Ross as a resource for you if you are interested in the origins debate, I haven't read him, but I've heard his name quite a bit, and he is very respected (I believe he takes a gap theory perspective)

Well, that's about it. I look forward to comments.
Peace,
Tom


Howdy.

Yes, I am a Christian and Creationist. I read "Origins of Life" by Hugh Ross. I am not a gap theorist supporter for various reasons, but his knowledge and science backing up the fact that life could not have spontaneously arrose from a primordial environment is excellent. He touches base with pretty much everything known to science as a valid theory about the origins of life.

My dad also owns a ton of Peretti books, so I may dig into them eventually.
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 19
grizzlymint
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grizzlymint
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07/07/2007 4:51 am
Just to let you all know, "East of Eden" has been nothing short of amazing and I'm just over halfway through it. (Its 600 pages long, so I'd say I'm not reading THAT slowly) Definitely the best read I've experienced yet. I'll be happy if I get into more books that make me think like this one does.
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 20

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