Thumb on the bass string?


Itsmesilly
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Itsmesilly
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07/07/2009 6:54 pm
I was making an attempt to learn/play a Dave Matthews tune..
( Ive also seen it in other songs )
and noticed on one guys rendition on youtube....the thumb is gripped around the neck to hold down the E string for a bass note...
so what do you do if you have small hands and cant get the rest of the chord when the thumb is on the E?
I have little hands and often have a hard time stretching to get certain chords
# 1
Mick J
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Mick J
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07/08/2009 7:20 pm
I don’t think it’s anything to worry about. I was learning a tune that used the thumb to play in the F-sharp position of the E string, just that one note followed by an arpeggio on some of the open strings. In that instance it was convenient and easy to use the thumb. Other than that, I think I would find it difficult to play with the thumb while forming a full or partial chord, so I usually look to play conventionally. I don’t think there are any hard and fast rules, just go with what’s more convenient.
I don’t think I’ve seen any lessons on here that use the thumb so don’t worry about it. Don’t forget that Hendrix played with his teeth! I bet there’s not many lessons in the style of Hendrix that will encourage you to do that!

Have a look at this blokes fingers, built to play guitar or what? If we could all have his attributes there would be no problem in what we are trying to achieve.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhU15PmQtZM
# 2
Razbo
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Razbo
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07/08/2009 7:39 pm
It's actually in a lesson here somewhere I am pretty sure. One involving the chords to what might or might not be Freebird, depending on licensing? It's like a D with an F#. (By now I should be able to figure that out, but I need paper to do it! :( ) Anywho, you can probably slide by without it. 90% of the unwashed masses will never notice. :D
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.
# 3
LisaMcC
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LisaMcC
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07/09/2009 1:59 am
Hey all-

D with F sharp is right on target. It's notated like this: D/F#. The language is: "D over F sharp". In musical terms, that means you are playing a D chord, but you are using a different Bass Note (not D, but in this case, F#)

To play it, it's a "standard" D chord, with the addition of your thumb wrapped to the second fret on the sixth string (that's the F#).

I have small hands too (heck, my entire profile does not rise much above 5' 1"). TMI. Sorry.

Anyway, when I first tried the thumb-thing, it seemed impossible to me too, but after some determined practicing and tweaking of my technique, it has now become absolutely central to my guitar playing and composing.

Don't give up! It's likely that with time and practice, you can stretch your muscles to accommodate this great technique.
Lisa McCormick, GT Instructor
Acoustic, Folk, Pop, Blues

Full Catalog of Lisa's Guitar Tricks Tutorials
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# 4
guitarplayer196
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guitarplayer196
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07/09/2009 11:17 pm
Originally Posted by: RazboIt's actually in a lesson here somewhere I am pretty sure. One involving the chords to what might or might not be Freebird, depending on licensing? It's like a D with an F#. (By now I should be able to figure that out, but I need paper to do it! :( ) Anywho, you can probably slide by without it. 90% of the unwashed masses will never notice. :D


Its the lesson on Open Chords and Arpeggios by Chris - In the Rock Course 1.

They are known as slash chords, which are a normal chord with an additional note in the bass.I have been playing for awhile and still have a hard time with them- I think it is something only certain guitarists can do - I usually just leave out the variation.
"I learned a long time ago that one note can go a long way if its the right one and it will probably whip the guy with 20 notes." Les Paul - 2002
# 5
raymand55
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raymand55
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07/10/2009 1:48 pm
I'm agreed what Mick J said that ....
I'm also suggest who want to improve their guitar technique , he/she must to practice themselves very hard .....
everyday what....
# 6
nmguitars
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nmguitars
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07/11/2009 11:39 am
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=208
# 7
Itsmesilly
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Itsmesilly
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07/12/2009 3:00 am
thanks for that link...just got home so I dont have time to check them all out right now but that looks like it will be a good source of info!
thanks for the help!
# 8

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