That linkin park guitar sound - how?

Guitar Tricks Forum > Tone and Effects > That linkin park guitar sound - how?

New Member

Joined: 01/29/04

Posts: 3

Before anyone starts flaming and go on about their chords not being advanced enough, let me tell you that I believe it about what you don't play as opposed to what you do play. :)

Ok, so how does Brad Delson from Linkin park get that phat guitar sound. It contains a lot of top and bottom and little middle. I believe he uses a mesa boogie, but what's the secret. Is it all in the production? Editing? Pro Tools effects? Or what is it?

#1

Before anyone starts flaming and go on about their chords not being advanced enough, let me tell you that I believe it about what you don't play as opposed to what you do play. :)

Ok, so how does Brad Delson from Linkin park get that phat guitar sound. It contains a lot of top and bottom and little middle. I believe he uses a mesa boogie, but what's the secret. Is it all in the production? Editing? Pro Tools effects? Or what is it?

Non-Existent

Joined: 05/26/03

Posts: 1597

Can you say 'expensive studio equipment and production the band had NOTHING to do with'?
Try once,fail twice...

#2

Can you say 'expensive studio equipment and production the band had NOTHING to do with'?
Try once,fail twice...

Registered User

Joined: 04/08/01

Posts: 1258

Erm.. Im guessing the fact that most of there songs are probably drop D tuned is the reason but I could be wrong.

#3

Erm.. Im guessing the fact that most of there songs are probably drop D tuned is the reason but I could be wrong.

Registered User

Joined: 08/08/03

Posts: 492

[QUOTE]Originally posted by chucklivesoninmyheart
Can you say 'expensive studio equipment and production the band had NOTHING to do with'?[/QUOTE]

LP is a band that's probably more involved in the production of their stuff than any other band in their genre.
And the sound really is all in the production.
Unfortunatly, there's no way to emulate that sound unless you're the guitarist of LP, playing guitar in an expensive studio through some really nice sounding gear, recording multiple tracks per song...

One tip though, he probably uses way more mids than you'd ever think...

#4

[QUOTE]Originally posted by chucklivesoninmyheart
Can you say 'expensive studio equipment and production the band had NOTHING to do with'?[/QUOTE]

LP is a band that's probably more involved in the production of their stuff than any other band in their genre.
And the sound really is all in the production.
Unfortunatly, there's no way to emulate that sound unless you're the guitarist of LP, playing guitar in an expensive studio through some really nice sounding gear, recording multiple tracks per song...

One tip though, he probably uses way more mids than you'd ever think...

Registered User

Joined: 09/23/03

Posts: 1679

^exactly.

He uses PRS, d'addario strings, and dimarzio dual somethingerother pickups, if I remember right. No idea what amp, anything loud is a good start.
"If one has realized a truth, that truth is valueless so long as there is lacking the indomitable will to turn this realization into action!"
-A.H.

#5

^exactly.

He uses PRS, d'addario strings, and dimarzio dual somethingerother pickups, if I remember right. No idea what amp, anything loud is a good start.
"If one has realized a truth, that truth is valueless so long as there is lacking the indomitable will to turn this realization into action!"
-A.H.

Insert witty remark here

Joined: 12/14/00

Posts: 1322

I'm pretty sure most of there songs (older ones) were in C, not drop D.
Sometimes I hit notes only dogs can hear.

#6

I'm pretty sure most of there songs (older ones) were in C, not drop D.
Sometimes I hit notes only dogs can hear.

New Member

Joined: 01/29/04

Posts: 3

Thanks guys.

Well, I'm not actually a guitarist. It's for my guitarist, but I know a fair bit about production.

First of all, I have read a lot of their older stuff is tuned in C sharp.

chucklivesoninmyheart, SPL.
What is this "expensive studio equipment" no one else can afford.
Guitar amp, effect processors, pre-amp, EQ, pickups, double (triple etc.) tracking?

Hammurabi: sorry, what is PRS? A brand of guitar?

#7

Thanks guys.

Well, I'm not actually a guitarist. It's for my guitarist, but I know a fair bit about production.

First of all, I have read a lot of their older stuff is tuned in C sharp.

chucklivesoninmyheart, SPL.
What is this "expensive studio equipment" no one else can afford.
Guitar amp, effect processors, pre-amp, EQ, pickups, double (triple etc.) tracking?

Hammurabi: sorry, what is PRS? A brand of guitar?

Registered User

Joined: 09/23/03

Posts: 1679

PRS= paul reed smith- an expensive and well respected brand of guitars.

Disturbed plays in C#, that's what I always use for comparison when talking about tunings.
"If one has realized a truth, that truth is valueless so long as there is lacking the indomitable will to turn this realization into action!"
-A.H.

#8

PRS= paul reed smith- an expensive and well respected brand of guitars.

Disturbed plays in C#, that's what I always use for comparison when talking about tunings.
"If one has realized a truth, that truth is valueless so long as there is lacking the indomitable will to turn this realization into action!"
-A.H.

Registered User

Joined: 08/08/03

Posts: 492

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Armadillo
What is this "expensive studio equipment" no one else can afford.
Guitar amp, effect processors, pre-amp, EQ, pickups, double (triple etc.) tracking?
[/QUOTE]

First of all, they record and mix their albums in world class studios, which means exceptionally good acoustics and control of sound. They most likely use SSL consoles to do their tracking and mixing, which are GREAT sounding consoles. They use the best A/D converters out there to get their stuff into Pro-Tools for editing. They probably use all kinds of nice outboard gear during tracking and mixing, mostly EQ's and compressors... I'm sure they use a bunch of plug-ins on top of that.
I think Brad from LP uses Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifiers for amps together with PRS guitars plus probably some Seymour Duncan pickups.
In order to get that big stereo guitar sound like LP you need layers and layers of different takes spread over the stereo image, preferable all with a relatively different sound to give them more seperation and enhance the big sound. Plus, the guitar and bass work together on that sounds, most people don't seem to be able to make that distinction.

#9

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Armadillo
What is this "expensive studio equipment" no one else can afford.
Guitar amp, effect processors, pre-amp, EQ, pickups, double (triple etc.) tracking?
[/QUOTE]

First of all, they record and mix their albums in world class studios, which means exceptionally good acoustics and control of sound. They most likely use SSL consoles to do their tracking and mixing, which are GREAT sounding consoles. They use the best A/D converters out there to get their stuff into Pro-Tools for editing. They probably use all kinds of nice outboard gear during tracking and mixing, mostly EQ's and compressors... I'm sure they use a bunch of plug-ins on top of that.
I think Brad from LP uses Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifiers for amps together with PRS guitars plus probably some Seymour Duncan pickups.
In order to get that big stereo guitar sound like LP you need layers and layers of different takes spread over the stereo image, preferable all with a relatively different sound to give them more seperation and enhance the big sound. Plus, the guitar and bass work together on that sounds, most people don't seem to be able to make that distinction.

New Member

Joined: 01/29/04

Posts: 3

[QUOTE]Originally posted by SPL

First of all, they record and mix their albums in world class studios, which means exceptionally good acoustics and control of sound. They most likely use SSL consoles to do their tracking and mixing, which are GREAT sounding consoles. They use the best A/D converters out there to get their stuff into Pro-Tools for editing. They probably use all kinds of nice outboard gear during tracking and mixing, mostly EQ's and compressors... I'm sure they use a bunch of plug-ins on top of that.
I think Brad from LP uses Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifiers for amps together with PRS guitars plus probably some Seymour Duncan pickups.
In order to get that big stereo guitar sound like LP you need layers and layers of different takes spread over the stereo image, preferable all with a relatively different sound to give them more seperation and enhance the big sound. Plus, the guitar and bass work together on that sounds, most people don't seem to be able to make that distinction.

[/QUOTE]
Acoustics are only important when mixing as electric guitars are recorded using line input and not miced up I would presume.
SSL is a good console I agree, but you can get a channel strip class A pre-amp for next to nothing these days. You get soundcards with 24 bit/96 khz, so I don't think the difference is that big.
EQ, compressor, yeah it makes a difference again, but still minor.
Amp, guitar, pickup, still small but noticeable difference.

The biggest difference I think is in your last point, layers recorded with different tones, maybe some of the layers slightly delayed to give a fuller sound.Different amount of reverb, EQ etc.
But I suppose if "I" only get 95% of the sound in each phase, then I'll in up with 75%-80% of the sound, by losing 5 % in each phase.
Yes, I have noticed the bassline is usually the same as the guitar.
Hmmm.... it ain't easy.

#10

[QUOTE]Originally posted by SPL

First of all, they record and mix their albums in world class studios, which means exceptionally good acoustics and control of sound. They most likely use SSL consoles to do their tracking and mixing, which are GREAT sounding consoles. They use the best A/D converters out there to get their stuff into Pro-Tools for editing. They probably use all kinds of nice outboard gear during tracking and mixing, mostly EQ's and compressors... I'm sure they use a bunch of plug-ins on top of that.
I think Brad from LP uses Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifiers for amps together with PRS guitars plus probably some Seymour Duncan pickups.
In order to get that big stereo guitar sound like LP you need layers and layers of different takes spread over the stereo image, preferable all with a relatively different sound to give them more seperation and enhance the big sound. Plus, the guitar and bass work together on that sounds, most people don't seem to be able to make that distinction.

[/QUOTE]
Acoustics are only important when mixing as electric guitars are recorded using line input and not miced up I would presume.
SSL is a good console I agree, but you can get a channel strip class A pre-amp for next to nothing these days. You get soundcards with 24 bit/96 khz, so I don't think the difference is that big.
EQ, compressor, yeah it makes a difference again, but still minor.
Amp, guitar, pickup, still small but noticeable difference.

The biggest difference I think is in your last point, layers recorded with different tones, maybe some of the layers slightly delayed to give a fuller sound.Different amount of reverb, EQ etc.
But I suppose if "I" only get 95% of the sound in each phase, then I'll in up with 75%-80% of the sound, by losing 5 % in each phase.
Yes, I have noticed the bassline is usually the same as the guitar.
Hmmm.... it ain't easy.