Trying to get the Bo Diddley sound


joesize
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joesize
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10/30/2020 8:57 am

I want to get as close to the sound on the Bo Diddley lesson as I can. I know I need the reverb, slap delay, and tremolo, and here’s what I have now:

Guitar- Gibson 335

Amps- Marshall TSL 601 (has good spring reverb)

Genz Benz Shenandoah Jr acoustic amp (has delay, and a kind of reverb)

Would it be okay to try to connect the two amps and try to get a tremolo pedal, or would it be better to try to find an effects processor that could do all three functions?

I don’t know what kind of equipment was used in the lesson.


# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,386
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,386
10/30/2020 3:41 pm
Originally Posted by: joesize

I want to get as close to the sound on the Bo Diddley lesson as I can.

[/quote]

Henrik breaks it down pretty well in this lesson.

https://www.guitartricks.com/lesson.php?input=23376&s_id=1897

[quote=joesize]

I know I need the reverb, slap delay, and tremolo, and here’s what I have now:

Guitar- Gibson 335

Amps- Marshall TSL 601 (has good spring reverb)

Genz Benz Shenandoah Jr acoustic amp (has delay, and a kind of reverb)

Would it be okay to try to connect the two amps and try to get a tremolo pedal, or would it be better to try to find an effects processor that could do all three functions?

I don’t know what kind of equipment was used in the lesson.

[p]I think the Marshall might be a better choice just because no matter what you do with the Genz Benz it's made for acoustic guitar. And those kind of amps usually have a much brighter high end. I don't think combining or connecting the amps is a good idea.

The only thing missing is the tremolo & you can get a decent inexpensive pedal from Boss & many other companies.

In the end it might be best to get an all-in-one effects processor that could do everything. But that depends on your budget. I don't think it's necessary to have every last effect in a setup. The most important ingredient is the playing skills to play the right notes at the right time!

Hope this helps!


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 2
joesize
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joesize
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10/30/2020 7:43 pm

Thanks- that's what I'm going to do.


# 3
JeffS65
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Joined: 10/07/08
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JeffS65
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11/03/2020 9:59 pm
Originally Posted by: joesize

I want to get as close to the sound on the Bo Diddley lesson as I can. I know I need the reverb, slap delay, and tremolo, and here’s what I have now:

Guitar- Gibson 335

Amps- Marshall TSL 601 (has good spring reverb)

Genz Benz Shenandoah Jr acoustic amp (has delay, and a kind of reverb)

Would it be okay to try to connect the two amps and try to get a tremolo pedal, or would it be better to try to find an effects processor that could do all three functions?

I don’t know what kind of equipment was used in the lesson.

Something to consider. Check out this video from Rhett Shull (link).

You have an ES 335 and that Marshall combo. With the reverb built in and an outboard tremolo, you'll have all the gear you need.

But will you get that tone you're looking for? I'm guessing that your 335 has more of the PAF/Classic pickups in it (depending on age, some had Burstbuckers).

Just from all the tone hunting I've done in my days, a couple of things that help get that sweetspot of clean and just the edge of break up are found in that Rhett Shull video as well as a judicous use of the guitar's volume knob. A little rollback can go a long way.

The guitar's volume knob is a very powerful tool that most guitar players ignore.

I follow Neil Schon on Instragram (and for the record, he is very interaction with his followers) and watching his videos, he is constantly adjusting the volume knob. It's a great fine tuning tool to get 'that' tone you're looking for.

So, just a couple more tips for my modest experience.


# 4
joesize
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joesize
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11/09/2020 3:06 am

Thanks, JeffS65, for the info. I had heard somewhere a few years back that the volume on the guitar should always be turned all the way up, so as to get all of the guitar’s potential. I think it was from Scott Grove on one of his Youtube videos. I don’t always do it, though, and I just saw your post, and watched the video through a couple of times. Those guys have an incredible knowledge. I haven’t bought the tremolo pedal yet, because another GT member loaned me a processor to play around with. It’s an older POD xt Live, and I’m going to see in the manual if I can get Delay and Tremolo from it, and just use the spring reverb in my amp. There are also some preset downloads available for the Bo Diddley sounds for the processor, that I guess somebody figured out and posted on the internet. I am going to try to check those out, too. All this should be fun to explore, but with all that, it’s going to hard to master the rhythm to be able to play the Bo Diddley stuff right. You mentioned pickups. I think they are Humbuckers. I bought the guitar new in 1967. It’s a Trini Lopez model. The sound holes are diamond instead of the usual f shape.


# 5
JeffS65
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JeffS65
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11/09/2020 3:33 pm
Originally Posted by: joesize

Thanks, JeffS65, for the info. I had heard somewhere a few years back that the volume on the guitar should always be turned all the way up, so as to get all of the guitar’s potential. I think it was from Scott Grove on one of his Youtube videos. I don’t always do it, though, and I just saw your post, and watched the video through a couple of times. Those guys have an incredible knowledge. I haven’t bought the tremolo pedal yet, because another GT member loaned me a processor to play around with. It’s an older POD xt Live, and I’m going to see in the manual if I can get Delay and Tremolo from it, and just use the spring reverb in my amp. There are also some preset downloads available for the Bo Diddley sounds for the processor, that I guess somebody figured out and posted on the internet. I am going to try to check those out, too. All this should be fun to explore, but with all that, it’s going to hard to master the rhythm to be able to play the Bo Diddley stuff right. You mentioned pickups. I think they are Humbuckers. I bought the guitar new in 1967. It’s a Trini Lopez model. The sound holes are diamond instead of the usual f shape.

Ok, I'll just start with this; a 1967 Trini Lopez? I am jealous. Great guitar.

So the pickups you have I assume are orginal to the guitar and that's a good thing. Over the years and mostly starting in the 70's, aftermarket pickup makers were just starting to come around. In order to get cutomers interested, the aftermarket guys had to make a product that differentiated itself from that pickups that guitar builders like Gibson put in their guitars. That meant that the aftermarket guys started making all kinds of versions of pickups making them 'hotter' or twangier or any number of things. All good stuff too.

But, when you're looking to get a more vintage sound, thathotter pickup not always desirable. With the Trini, you have the 60's version of PAFs that are not overwound and overly hot. Good. You don't want too hot. For the tone you seek, you want a pickup that isn't too pushy. The Trini has that kind of pickup; not too pushy.

I do think the advice from Scott Grove is not good. Think of it this way; if you have a manual four speed in your car, will it always be in 4th gear? Nope. You use the other gears too.

I'm long guilty of keeping the volume knob full up to 10. My harping on this is from mistakenly thinking like Scott does; why mute the full potential?

If you think of it as 'full potential', you might be missing the point.

You're actually missing the full potential of the volume knob's power. There are lots of ways to explore at volume nine below on the volume knob. It took me years to get that through my head. Granted, when I started playing in '81, I was more hard rock and metal and the volume knob wasn't all that important. However, over the years, my jones to play more bluesy and Americana has led me to explore a more refined approach to looking for tone. That includes the kind of control you have in how much signal you push to the amp.

That's actually kind of the point; your amp reacts to what you push through the volume knob on your guitar. You may not always want that to be full throttle. It might be that you want the push to be just below breaking up the signal to give you a sweet little bit of dirt and then, say for a solo, spin the volume knob up to make it sing.

It's a journey for all of us and we all find our way on different paths. God know I did. But from a long time player, and mistakes I made, don't run with just one opinion but explore the different bits of advice and find what works for you. I'd say just don't exclude a techique or a thing another guitar player does without giving it a try.


# 6
joesize
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joesize
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11/20/2020 8:25 pm

Good info, and thanks! Incidentally, I went back and checked the serial number on the Trini and it was manufactured in 1965, so I must have bought it in 66. The store was Wallach’s Music City in Hollywood, and I saw where Frank Zappa was working there part-time as a sales clerk in ‘65. The old boy made good, and it makes you wonder how many really good musicians are working in the big music stores these days. There must be more great players than there are opportunities. I have heard some good players demo’ing guitars.

Anyhow, as long as I have loaded up this reply with a lot of the non-essential I might as well mention that I bought an amp with the Trini; a Fender Princeton Reverb. I kept it in my basement until the middle 1990s, and when it wouldn’t make any sound I tossed it the dumpster, only to read later that it was considered some kind of classic unit. Oh, well.


# 7
bekeanloinse56
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bekeanloinse56
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07/01/2023 4:13 am

In the case of the Fender Princeton Reverb, it is indeed a beloved classic amplifier known for its warm tone and reverb capabilities. It's unfortunate that you disposed of it without knowing its value, but these things happen. It's a reminder that certain gear can appreciate in worth and become highly regarded by musicians and collectors.


wordle


# 8

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