Revisit Lessons


ThorfinnFrisken
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Joined: 03/20/13
Posts: 140
ThorfinnFrisken
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Joined: 03/20/13
Posts: 140
04/21/2014 4:04 pm
It is amazing. I went back and was revisiting some lessons in GF2 and as I was watching one it clicked! It didn't when I went thru it the first time but this time, it clicked. I HIGHLY recommend beginners to go thru GF1 and GF2 and then after a few months or so....go thru them again as a review.

This might be simple to some, but I was trying to memorize scales NOT the patterns and it was not clicking. Now that I went thru the Intro to Music Theory lessons again in GF2 it really clicked. So the C Major scale I can do in my sleep but having problems do other Major scales, take the PATTERN, not the notes to move to another root note. (facepalm).
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Learning guitar, one chord at a time...
# 1
Slipin Lizard
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Joined: 11/15/07
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Slipin Lizard
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Joined: 11/15/07
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04/21/2014 5:01 pm
Originally Posted by: ThorfinnFrisken
This might be simple to some, but I was trying to memorize scales NOT the patterns and it was not clicking. Now that I went thru the Intro to Music Theory lessons again in GF2 it really clicked. So the C Major scale I can do in my sleep but having problems do other Major scales, take the PATTERN, not the notes to move to another root note. (facepalm).


Great that things are making sense for you now... not really sure what you mean by "facepalm". Honestly, this may not be quite the revelation you think it is... Its sounds like you're saying that you've realized that the pattern you learned for the C major scale can be applied to other root notes, which will produce the major scale for whatever root note you have chosen, and some of the notes will be different from the C major scale. Is that right? And instead you were trying to apply the same notes as the C major scale to another root note, but that wasn't working for you?

If that's the case, then it sounds like you just went wrong somewhere along the way, and misunderstood how patterns are used when playing scales, but at least its clear to you now. There are only twelve different notes to choose from, which are repeated across the fretboard. This means that between any two different seven note scales, there will be at least two notes that are the same. Some "different" scales have the same notes... C major and A minor for example. So in this case, you'd be using the same notes in different patterns to play the two scales. But this gets into modes territory which you may not be ready for.

Just try to use logic when you're going through this stuff. If you've learned the pattern for C major, and now you want to play D major, you're not going to play the same notes as C major... otherwise all the major scales would be just one scale!

Big piece of advice with this stuff... don't just learn a scale pattern and then say "oh that's it, I've got it mastered.."... you need to apply it, actually use it in a song, solo, whatever. If you just learn the pattern and then never use it a musical context, it won't stick. When you start using this stuff in context, it tends to make much more sense! :)
# 2
ThorfinnFrisken
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ThorfinnFrisken
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04/21/2014 5:16 pm
Originally Posted by: Slipin Lizard
Just try to use logic when you're going through this stuff. If you've learned the pattern for C major, and now you want to play D major, you're not going to play the same notes as C major... otherwise all the major scales would be just one scale!
[/QUOTE]
Yes, I was not using logic and applying notes, not the pattern and it my brain kept telling me that they would all be the same then. Now with the pattern (WS,HS, etc) it all makes sense on how you get your different sounding patterns.

[QUOTE=Slipin Lizard]
Big piece of advice with this stuff... don't just learn a scale pattern and then say "oh that's it, I've got it mastered.."... you need to apply it, actually use it in a song, solo, whatever. If you just learn the pattern and then never use it a musical context, it won't stick. When you start using this stuff in context, it tends to make much more sense! :)

I have a mindset of practice does NOT make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. I have not used the scales much because I have a feeling I was doing them wrong (and I was all wrong on it) and I was afraid I would practice them a ton and ingrain the wrong info in my head, which I would have.

Now I am going to practice them for a couple weeks and then work on moving around the fret board in them over some backtracks for practice. Thanks!
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Learning guitar, one chord at a time...
# 3
maggior
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maggior
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04/21/2014 5:42 pm
Certainly you want to practice the right things right! It's hard enough learning something once, let along having to unlearn it, and than learn it correctly again.

Having the sound of the scale embedded in your brain is very helpful, and you can get this by practicing the scale repeatedly while getting it into your muscle memory. The major scale is a good one to start with since even a non musical person will recognize it. Then you'll be able to do the major scale anywhere on the neck starting on any fret on any string. Maybe you won't be able to hit it straight off, but you'll be able to figure it out quickly because you'll know if you hit a bum note - you know how it sounds!

Committing the formula "wwhwwwh" to memory helps too. This is the formula for the major scale starting with any note and is also what the modes are derived from (when you get there).

What helped me with this was putting down my guitar and applying the formula "wwhwwwh" on paper, from any note figuring out the other notes in the scale, and drawing the patterns out for the fretboard. Essentially, you can derive the 5 scale patterns for yourself. This way they mean something to you and aren't just a magic pattern.

You are correct that it is worthwhile to revisit lessons especially where you may have not absorbed everything the first time. You learn more and going back, you have a better context to understand it with. Happens to me all of the time...and will continue to do so I'm sure.
# 4
ThorfinnFrisken
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ThorfinnFrisken
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04/21/2014 6:04 pm
Originally Posted by: maggiorWhat helped me with this was putting down my guitar and applying the formula "wwhwwwh" on paper, from any note figuring out the other notes in the scale, and drawing the patterns out for the fretboard. Essentially, you can derive the 5 scale patterns for yourself. This way they mean something to you and aren't just a magic pattern.


I didn't think about that. I have a bunch of blank sheet music and tab pages. Take practice in writing them down in Tab form and also in music note form.
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Learning guitar, one chord at a time...
# 5
maggior
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maggior
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04/21/2014 8:15 pm
Originally Posted by: ThorfinnFriskenI didn't think about that. I have a bunch of blank sheet music and tab pages. Take practice in writing them down in Tab form and also in music note form.


You can also get fretboard paper. If you are interested, I can post a link where you can print them out for yourself rather than buying it. I find that easier than writing TAB, but that works too. A good way of getting used to TABs..I hadn't thought of that :-)!!

Approaching it from all of these angles embeds the information in your brain in a variety of ways - muscle memory, visual memory, aural memory. Some also suggest saying what note you are playing...even sing it...to further embed the association in your memory.

BTW, credit for these approaches go to Slipin since he sent me down this road...I have found it helpful.
# 6
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
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ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,309
04/22/2014 1:18 am
Originally Posted by: ThorfinnFriskenIt is amazing. I went back and was revisiting some lessons in GF2 and as I was watching one it clicked! It didn't when I went thru it the first time but this time, it clicked. I HIGHLY recommend beginners to go thru GF1 and GF2 and then after a few months or so....go thru them again as a review.

Thank you. :)

I try to encourage all students to continually review the basics. Always go back over the fundamentals. For GT students, as long as you are practicing regularly, then going back over course material regularly will help you make progress. As you build skills & confidence, you are less focused on the mechanical skills & frustrations. You are able to grasp deeper & wider principles in the material & see wider applications & implications.

The courses are very concise, but packed with enough info for many, many viewings. This is exactly how this material was designed to be used. :)

Thanks again for starting this thread!
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 7
Slipin Lizard
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Joined: 11/15/07
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Slipin Lizard
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04/22/2014 8:08 pm
Originally Posted by: ThorfinnFrisken
I have a mindset of practice does NOT make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect.


This is such a good realization. Stick with it. Its way better to be able to play something simple flawlessly than something more complicated poorly.
# 8
ThorfinnFrisken
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ThorfinnFrisken
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04/23/2014 4:03 pm
It is the phrase I push on all the new people I train in my sport.

"Do not practice wrong. Otherwise you will have a very hard time forgetting and relearning right in the future. And bad habits cost you wins."
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Learning guitar, one chord at a time...
# 9

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