Arpeggios Vs Chord tones Solo?


kjpro
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kjpro
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06/21/2010 11:54 pm
Hi all, just want to know how arpeggios work in a solo as opposed to chord tones. Are they the same and if not what's the difference?
# 1
Jarsew
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Jarsew
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06/22/2010 12:55 am
Arpeggios are chords; but rather than hitting all the notes at the same time like a chord, you hit them one at a time.

Theres hundreds of video lessons on youtube, heres just a random one I pulled from Paul Gilbert:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWw9EAJWAsI
# 2
ChristopherSchlegel
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Posts: 8,354
ChristopherSchlegel
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Posts: 8,354
06/22/2010 2:16 am
Originally Posted by: kjproHi all, just want to know how arpeggios work in a solo as opposed to chord tones. Are they the same and if not what's the difference?

Jarsew gave you the right answer: arpeggios are broken chords, chords played one note at a time instead of all at once, ergo, using chord tones to play a solo is essentially the same as using arpeggios to play a solo.

These tutorials can show you how in blues:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=826

In rock:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=973
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=980

Here's the basics of sweeping:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=985

And some advanced ideas:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=408
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=211

I'll be updating those to High-Definition video soon. :)

You might also have a look at targeting chord tones in this series of tutorials on the basics of improvisation:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=876
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=483
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=491

Douglas Showalter also recently did a tutorial on chord tone soloing:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=958

Hope this helps. Have fun!
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 3
kjpro
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kjpro
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06/22/2010 9:22 pm
So then if i understand you correctly chord tone solo is just another way to say arpeggio?
# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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06/23/2010 12:33 am
Originally Posted by: kjproSo then if i understand you correctly chord tone solo is just another way to say arpeggio?

An arpeggio is the technique of playing chord tones, which are the notes of a chord. Therefore, an arpeggio is one possible way of playing chord tones.

You can use them to play solos, as well as melodies or chords of a song.
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 5
James.Erickson
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James.Erickson
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06/28/2010 12:51 am
Originally Posted by: kjproHi all, just want to know how arpeggios work in a solo as opposed to chord tones. Are they the same and if not what's the difference?


Arpeggios are sequential successions of the chord tones (in whatever their arrangement: root position, first inversion, second inversion, etc). Arpeggios do not have to be played in a sweep manner, but for many guitarists they usually are for dramatic effect. It is using the inherit emotion of the chord as a lick or a line instead of a "block".

Chord tones are not necessarily played in sequential fashion. You can play chord tones in any order at any time. Arpeggios, no matter the rhythm played are always played in a specific order depending on the chord used. So some examples for using chord tones are: in a melody, or in a lick, or in a tapping, or in legato lines, etc. Chord tones in solos often function as the release of tension. You use the non-chord tones as the tension builders, but use the chord tones as the moments of release.
# 6
Joe Pinnavaia
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Joe Pinnavaia
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06/28/2010 2:11 pm
Chord tones can be used to build melodies and keep your playing grounded in what the harmony is. It's a great way to have your solos or melodies make sense and keep the listener's attention. Arpeggios can be used in soloing and makes for a more dramatic and flashier effect without getting to "outside" the harmony that you are soloing over. I have a video posted that covers how to handle a I IV V7 chord progression with chord tones and basically building arpeggios on one string at a time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-orDodMda98

Hope you enjoy!

All the best,
Joe Pinnavaia
www.guitarlessonsbuffalony.com
# 7
Douglas Showalter
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Douglas Showalter
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Posts: 817
06/30/2010 6:45 pm
You can use arpeggios as a way of playing chord tones in your solo or whatever you are working out on your instrument. However, they are not one in the same. Say you are playing over a C major chord, you could play an A minor arpeggio over the top of it and it would sound great. In that A minor, you have an A; which is not in a C chord. So, in that application you are only playing some of the chord tones. You can use both the arpeggios and chord tones in your solos. More importantly, whatever you play; OWN IT!

I have a Chord Tone Soloing tutorial up on Guitar Tricks that uses arpeggios and such at the link below. Good luck! :eek:

Chord Tone Soloing Tutorial
Douglas Showalter
# 8
owenvaughan
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owenvaughan
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07/21/2010 3:43 pm
I think a great example of chord and non chord tones in one lick is the classic blues m3rd-maj3rd over a dominant 7 chord lick:

A7: 1 3 5 b7 A C# E G

Eg:

5 to 6 fret 3rd/G string (C b3 "non chord tone" to C# 3, A chord tone) then 5th fret B/2nd string (giving an E, thus the 5th) then 5th fret E/1st string (A which is root/tonic/1 whatever you want to call it!) then bending the b7 G at 8th fret B/2nd string up to the root note A.

"Real deal" players tend to approach a blues using Dom7 (or 9 etc) chords by playing the relevant arpeggios, Mixolydian and minor pentatonic scales all combined, weaving in and out of the underlying chord below.

Check out Robben Ford, Carl Verhyan and similar...
# 9

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