"simple" chords


GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
03/31/2009 11:46 pm
During GF1 I learned something called 'simple chords' during the very early lessons. Such as fretting the 1st fret second string and playing only three strings to get a C chord. I think there was a G 'simple' chord too. Later I learned the full open chords, A thru G and now I'm wondering what happened to the simple ones?

Are there other 'simple' chords? (B, D, F, etc)
Are these 'simple' chords used or are they just a learning tool?
Do they fit into the 1-3-5 format or do they have their own 'rules'?
Am I getting ahead of myself? :)

Thanks,
GG
# 1
Razbo
Full Access
Joined: 03/02/09
Posts: 1,562
Razbo
Full Access
Joined: 03/02/09
Posts: 1,562
04/01/2009 12:18 am
I think by 'simple chords' you are talking about open chords, as in they are formed using unfretted strings. They follow the same 1, 3, 5 rule (a rule I never knew before this site :)). Except for B & F, the rest have an open chord arrangement. (But B & F also have a simple version, but no open strings, so they are still not 'open' chords.)

Did I get your question right?
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.
# 2
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
04/01/2009 12:29 am
I don't think so...........if I've got this right, then the 'open' or 'full' chord for Cmaj is

o
1
o
2
3
x

you are using three fingers and playing 5 strings, two of them open. If you remove finger 2 and 3, and just play

o
1
o
x
x
x

that was the 'simple' chord for Cmaj in GF1.

I now see that it fits the 1 -3 -5 pattern now (C- E- and G). Do the other 'simple' chords fit?

I hope my tabs are readable.

gg
# 3
Razbo
Full Access
Joined: 03/02/09
Posts: 1,562
Razbo
Full Access
Joined: 03/02/09
Posts: 1,562
04/01/2009 12:52 am
I get it. I don't know off hand, but you clearly have the theory you need to investigate the rest. :)

I think in general, you'll get a better sounding chord if you get the root note on the lowest string. That simple "C" is technically correct, but ...well, does it sound good to you? There was another example in GF1 where playing the G note on the open C chord (on the low E string) was also technically correct, but didn't sound so good.

I think we might be talking about triads. Here's a link on triads

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=389
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.
# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,348
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,348
04/01/2009 1:25 am
Originally Posted by: GuitardedGeezerAre there other 'simple' chords? (B, D, F, etc)

The concept you are after is the triad chord and their inversions:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=148

These lessons have been reshot in High-Definition. I will be editing them this coming month and will replace the old vids with new ones. Same great content; much better resolution video and audio. :)
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 5
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
04/01/2009 2:58 am
Ok. I see how the Cmaj chord I've described is both one form of a triad and and inversion since the G is the lowest 'in the bass voice' of the chord. I also see how it is a technically correct chord, but doesn't get the 'full' sound.

So, I'm guessing this is just a triad that all the notes are played at the same time as opposed to all the other kinds of triads. The examples in the triad lessons had all the notes played separately, not strummed all at once like a chord. And the playing all the notes at once is what makes it a chord?

I'm also guessing there must be dozens of other 'simple' chords, by forming a triad based on each note and placing the notes so it can be played all at once like a chord?
# 6
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,348
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,348
04/01/2009 2:30 pm
Originally Posted by: GuitardedGeezerSo, I'm guessing this is just a triad that all the notes are played at the same time as opposed to all the other kinds of triads.
[/quote]
The triads in the triad tutorial can't be played all at the same time because some of the notes are on the same strings. All the triads in the inversion tutorial can be played at the same because all of their notes are on separate (but, adjacent strings).

Regardless, all of them are triads and chords.
Originally Posted by: GuitardedGeezer
The examples in the triad lessons had all the notes played separately, not strummed all at once like a chord. And the playing all the notes at once is what makes it a chord?

A chord is the 1st, 3rd and 5th note of a scale. Usually they are played together. If you slightly separate them time-wise (temporaly) then they are still a chord, but it is called an arpeggio; which is defined as a broken chord, or playing the notes one after each other and not simultaneously. That is an arpeggiated chord.
[QUOTE=GuitardedGeezer]
I'm also guessing there must be dozens of other 'simple' chords, by forming a triad based on each note and placing the notes so it can be played all at once like a chord?

You bet. They are all listed in the lesson video and the image diagrams in the lessons of the Chord Inversion tutorial:

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=148
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 7
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
GuitardedGeezer
Registered User
Joined: 03/05/09
Posts: 96
04/01/2009 8:25 pm
Thanks Raz and Chris. It's so nice when the jumble of ideas and guesses suddenly come together and you say to yourself "okaaaaaaay, I get it now!"

Chris, you are one high-speed, low-drag, nap-of-the-earth instructor. I've really enjoyed GF1 and 2 (working on chap 3 now). Thanks for making this fun, fairly easy, and always interesting. I'm sure I'm going to enjoy discussing theory with you in the future.

GG
# 8
t.k. gardner
Registered User
Joined: 03/28/09
Posts: 9
t.k. gardner
Registered User
Joined: 03/28/09
Posts: 9
04/13/2009 5:04 pm
Can I just add that what you are calling simple chords as opposed to "full" chords are chords that have only one of each of the elements of the chord in it. Like one Root, one 3rd and one 5th (CEG). A "full" chord (open position C chord say) has 2 roots 2 thirds and 1 5th. Learning to hear the triads or simple chords makes learning voice-leading easier down the road, and allows you to be much more creative and musical as you become a better player. It requires you to know all of the notes on the fingerboard, but is you get into more sophisticated kinds of music it will be well worth it.
# 9

Please register with a free account to post on the forum.