Scale books


TexAxe
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TexAxe
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02/04/2008 6:31 pm
I have seen plenty of scale books that list a particular scale, say, the pentatonic, but give it in a "box" position only and never lay out the rest of the scale on the fretboard. I've also seen scale books that outline only part of the scale on certain strings, but not on the other strings. I know many scales as result of many hours of reading, watching, and internet surfiing, but I was wondering if anyone could explain why scale books don't just lay-out the entire scale in one key and then explain how the scale moves up and down the neck depending on what key you wanna play in? Seems to me this would be easier than just divulging bits and pieces of the scale here and there as though that's the entire scale and the only place to play it on the neck.
# 1
hunter60
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hunter60
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02/04/2008 6:55 pm
Interesting question - doesn't the gritmore series show the scales in extended positons up and down the neck?
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# 2


Joined: 06/15/24
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02/04/2008 11:56 pm
That was exactly what I use to say about scale books. They often explain a scale in a way that makes you think a scale is that box or that box.

This is why I was happy to see Christopher Schlegel's approach to the pentatonic scale here in GT. Yes, thinking about boxes makes it easier to remember but it shouldn't make you static in your playing. Once you've learn the boxes, you need to learn how to link them and I think this is where most books fail.

Then again, if you would show all the notes of a scale on the entire fretboard..... that would make it very hard to memorize them. So I beleive the key lies in making memorizing entire fretboard scale by breaking them into smaller pieces "but you need to teach how to link the peice" lol Otherwise it's very hard for the student to learn how to effectively use link those small parts.
# 3
turkeyjerky214
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turkeyjerky214
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02/05/2008 1:13 am
Originally Posted by: BenoitSo I beleive the key lies in making memorizing entire fretboard scale by breaking them into smaller pieces "but you need to teach how to link the peice"


I completely agree with this. Scales are very easy to memorize from their base position on the E string. I've found the easiest way to learn them the rest of the way is to learn them in boxes and then learn the most common ways people link them together.
# 4
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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02/05/2008 1:19 am
Pentatonic tutorials:

Theory:
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=296

Practice:
http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=185

Thanks for the mention, Ben. :)
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
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justinbrown
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justinbrown
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02/05/2008 1:29 am
Sorry I am not sure how or where to post my question so Ill just post here and hope for a response. I have been playing for 15yrs and I am limited on knowledge but good at playing. Can anyone recommend a good theory book I can purchase that will include symbols, chords and how they work with scales, arpeggios ect........
Thanks!
# 6
BrokenJera
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BrokenJera
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02/06/2008 6:17 am
i have a theroy on this im trying to prove right now. i am also trying to learn the boxes and patterns but i am struggling.

the one thing i am finding very help full on memorizing all this stuff is to first learn the notes on the fingerboard. you dont need to learn sheet music but if you can memorize all the notes below the 12th fret and can recall them very quickly (the faster the better) you dont really need to know where every 7 note c major scale is just where the c notes are and the formula or pattern on how to make it.


but like i said this is just my theory and i still havent even proved it.
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# 7
Chris Martins
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Chris Martins
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02/06/2008 9:05 am
I use the "guitar grimoire". Most complete scale book ever. The theory side is not really explained in depth, but that can be found elsewhere easily. Once you understand how the book is designed, you can find all the scales you can think of ( and ones you haven't even heard of ), their modes, matching chords...
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hunter1801
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hunter1801
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02/06/2008 10:43 pm
Originally Posted by: Chris MartinsI use the "guitar grimoire". Most complete scale book ever.


I'd buy the book just for that awesome title.
# 9

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