Synchopation


Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15

Hi


Anyone guide me to tutorial re synchopation? I searched but could not find any. 


 



# 1
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15


# 2
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15

An example of what I am trying to achieve is attached.


 



# 3
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15


# 4
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15


# 5
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15

Sorry. I give up. Cant get the picture to attach


# 6
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15

Synchopation


# 7
Drake the Red
Full Access (Full Addict)
Joined: 10/12/11
Posts: 317

Syncopation? Try any tutorials on rhythm and timing. Lisa briefly mentions it in the former Guitar Fundamentals 2.


Wow, it's 2023 already? Time goes fast.

# 8
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 7,929
#1 Originally Posted by: Ianelrick

Hi


Anyone guide me to tutorial re synchopation? I searched but could not find any. 


 


Sycopation is using a variety of rhythms played or implied at the same time. That's it. It can be done in a virtually endless variety of ways.


So it depends on how you are trying to apply the concept, what style of music, what kind of chords, lines, etc.  Let's try some specific examples.


In this tutorial on basic strumming patterns Lisa shows how to combine playing some strums on the downbeats (the counted numbers) & others in between the beats (the eighth note upbeats).  This is a basic kind of syncopation done by one player with strumming chords on acoustic guitar.  It's a more interesting rhythm than if you were just simply strum every downbeat, or all the eighth notes.


https://www.guitartricks.com/lesson/23537 


In this tutorial on rock rhythm guitar I show how to use a syncopated type of rhythm in a different style with a slightly different physical technique.


https://www.guitartricks.com/lesson/19311


Hope that helps!


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 9
Ianelrick
Registered User
Joined: 09/18/21
Posts: 15

Thanks. I really wish I could post the picture.


The piece I want to play is of a funk/neo soul style. 


 It comprises 4 sets of 4 beamed 16th notes ie 4 groups of 4. 


What is challenging is that all are muted except:


Group 1 - 3rd note is unmuted


Group 2 - 2nd note is unmuted


Group 3 - 1st note is unmuted


Group 4 - the 3rd and 4th notes are unmuted.


This means that 2 noted muted are followed by  1 note unmuted followed by 2 notes muted for most of the bar. 


I am struggling with the timing or synching of unmuting/remuting  such a piece . 


 


# 10
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 7,929
#10 Originally Posted by: Ianelrick

Thanks. I really wish I could post the picture.


The piece I want to play is of a funk/neo soul style. 


 It comprises 4 sets of 4 beamed 16th notes ie 4 groups of 4. 


What is challenging is that all are muted except:


Group 1 - 3rd note is unmuted


Group 2 - 2nd note is unmuted


Group 3 - 1st note is unmuted


Group 4 - the 3rd and 4th notes are unmuted.


This means that 2 noted muted are followed by  1 note unmuted followed by 2 notes muted for most of the bar. 


I am struggling with the timing or synching of unmuting/remuting  such a piece . 


 

That kind of funk rhythm can be tricky to get used to.  The first thing to do is make sure to keep your strumming hand in constant alternate motion on those 1/16th notes.  Start by muting all of the 1/16th notes.  Then slowly count & focus on one unmute at a time.


Just work on the first beat.  Loop it over & again.  Same for the second beat.  Then work on combining them.  Then add the 3rd & 4th beats in this manner.  Go slow enough to count out the 1/16th notes so you know you're getting it right.


This lesson demontrates how to do that technique.


https://www.guitartricks.com/lesson/12404


Hope that helps!


 


 


Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 11