Pinky G


elenapronk
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Joined: 05/01/20
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elenapronk
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Joined: 05/01/20
Posts: 1
05/07/2020 2:00 pm

I'm new to guitarplaying, so my hands still need to ajust to the technique, but my ringfinger and pinky can't stretch very far from one another. This makes it impossible to play the pinky G. Chord changes are a bit more difficult with the normal G, but that is something I can work on. I was wondering whether this will be problematic later on.

BTW, I am trying to stretch these fingers more, but I think it's also a problem with the build of my hand.


# 1
devanski
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devanski
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05/08/2020 5:01 pm

Hey elanapronk,

G was one of the chords that I knew from a long time ago and when I started the lessons the 'pinky G' was totally alien to me and I had to force myself to use it, as it seemed more logical for some of the chord changes.

In short my pinky was too lazy to bend and reach the bottom at the high E string... but I think if you keep at it, it will start to happen for you. From the 1st string (ring finger) to the E string is not that big a stretch really, it will just take time and practice.

I know I still use 'traditional G' from time to time because it's a hard habit to change ... but I'm getting better the more I force myself to use pinky G.

Best I can offer...

Dev


# 2
AndrewTanner
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AndrewTanner
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05/08/2020 5:10 pm

I'm a self taught guitarist, have been playing 16 years. I decided to get serious about theory and add some structure to my learning, hence sigining up for the site! What I found from watching the videos is that many of the tricks, such as alternative fingerings I already had taught myself when learning all those years ago. I didn't really pick up many bad habits but when I did I kinda knew they were bad habits so I grew out of them (e.g using my ring finger to fret the 5th and the octave in a power chord).

Regarding pinky G, this isn't really something I ever toyed around with. I knew I could do it if needed but I prefer sticking with regular G. Ultimately you can use whatever you find most comfortable in the long run, but while learning it's really important to not neglect the pinky so make sure you really try pinky G. G on the whole is a nightmare to learn but you'll feel the benefit in the long run when your pink can keep up with the rest :)


# 3
jrpierce06420
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jrpierce06420
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05/09/2020 1:59 pm

I am just a beginner myself so I don't know if this is a bad thing, but I find myself using a hybrid. Instead of "regular G": fingers 1, 2 and 3; or "pinky G": fingers 2,3 and 4; I am using 1, 2 and 4. It is definitely the most comfortable combination for me. It may not lend itself to good chord changes though, so I'm wondering if I should break myself of it.


# 4
mjgodin
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mjgodin
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05/09/2020 3:37 pm
Originally Posted by: jrpierce06420

I am just a beginner myself so I don't know if this is a bad thing, but I find myself using a hybrid. Instead of "regular G": fingers 1, 2 and 3; or "pinky G": fingers 2,3 and 4; I am using 1, 2 and 4. It is definitely the most comfortable combination for me. It may not lend itself to good chord changes though, so I'm wondering if I should break myself of it.

I wouldn't, because there is another variation of G you all will discover soon enough and that is using four fingers. 1,2, and 4 like your doing, but add the third on the B string. Notice how nice it sounds. It's hard at first but you'll discover its usefullness later on.

Now once you add the fourth finger into it move the first two down one string, keeping the third and fourth on B and E. That's called a Cadd9. Switch between that and four finger G chord by going up and down with the first two strings and you now learned the opening to "Every Rose has a Thorn" by Poison taught by Caren Armstrong. Pretty cool huh. See how it all ties together. There is a reason for everything your being taught with all the variations, but from a learning perspective you really should be learning the G chord using the 1,2,3 method. As time goes on the Pinky G will be an advantage to you when switching chords but that finger is the toughest to get into shape from a flexibility standpoint and to form a callous so give it time.

Hope that helps but I'm a beginner as well so take my advice for what it's worth. You can always ask the instructors directly as they have their own threads in this forum and they're very good at getting back to people. Lisa especially as she handles the fundamentals classes. Good Luck.

Moe


# 5
jrpierce06420
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jrpierce06420
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05/10/2020 12:46 am

Now once you add the fourth finger into it move the first two down one string, keeping the third and fourth on B and E. That's called a Cadd9. Switch between that and four finger G chord by going up and down with the first two strings and you now learned the opening to "Every Rose has a Thorn" by Poison taught by Caren Armstrong. Pretty cool huh.

Moe

[/quote]

That is pretty cool. Thanks, Moe


# 6
mjgodin
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mjgodin
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05/10/2020 11:43 am

Your Welcome, of course Caren does a better job of teaching you to play it far better than I could and it's on the song list as a "made easy" version so check it out sometime. Great first song for beginners to play.

Moe


# 7

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