Circle of 5th


Ramon L Candido
Registered User
Joined: 12/13/10
Posts: 12
Ramon L Candido
Registered User
Joined: 12/13/10
Posts: 12
01/16/2014 4:48 am
The 5th note is the dominant as in the key of C that is G, counterclock wise the F is subdominant or the 4th note, in G the C is the 4th and D the dominant. Clockwise are the sharp Keys, while the left side cancels the sharp notes making them neutral notes while those notes that are not sharp are flattend. Meaning the B has 5 sharps except B and E. B flat major has 2 flat notes the B and E and the sharp ones are canceled makin them neutral notes. The major scale intervals are the cause of the flat and sharps of notes in a given scale. Applying the circle of 5th to a song means adding more chord and notes to make it more desirable to the ear. Key of G plus the chord F#minor derived from the 6th note of G and B7 taken from the 6th note of G is an example of this additions instead of going from G to Eminor. With regards to arpeggios or neo classical, an Aminor chord is played A C E in the key of C and an additional note is added which will lead back to A note. Likewise applying a diminshed scale to a secondary dominant which is derived from the 6th note, the guitar player uses a diminished scale to resolved to the 5th chord.

Frankly I haven't applied this Circle of 5th fully to actual use specially to songs. If there are mistakes kindly correct me.

retired employee 2012 , widower 2015 , Three grandchildren , Study Guitar .

# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,386
ChristopherSchlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,386
01/16/2014 3:33 pm
Originally Posted by: ramoncandido
Frankly I haven't applied this Circle of 5th fully to actual use specially to songs. If there are mistakes kindly correct me.

It looks like you understand the basic concept. The next important step is to apply it so that it becomes a useful tool to you in making music!

I cover the circle of fifths & it's possible applications in this tutorial.

http://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=835

Hope this helps
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory
# 2
Ramon L Candido
Registered User
Joined: 12/13/10
Posts: 12
Ramon L Candido
Registered User
Joined: 12/13/10
Posts: 12
01/21/2014 2:59 am
The C scale has no flat or sharp notes, if I add a flat B note instead of a B note I will have an F scale, add a flat E you have a flat B major. From this point adding a flat A, D G C will give a corresponding scale in the cycle of 4th. Example if I add a flat A to the flat B and E I get an E flat major scale. On the other hand if I sharpen the F I get a G scale, adding a sharp C will give me a D major scale. From this point adding a sharp G D A E will give me the cycle of 5th scale. Starting with any note of the scale either in cycle 4th or 5th will give me that equivalent of the mother scale. Right now I am on GF 2 level lesson on C major minor scale runs/practice. The reason I brought this up is to clear my mind if this is correct or not. In this case the C minor belongs to Eb major because the E B A was replaced with a flat E B A note, a cycle of 4th scale.

retired employee 2012 , widower 2015 , Three grandchildren , Study Guitar .

# 3

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