Classical Acoustic Guitars?


grizzlymint
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Joined: 01/02/07
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grizzlymint
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Joined: 01/02/07
Posts: 644
08/17/2007 3:10 pm
If anyone here has any experience in playing classical acoustic guitars, could you give me some recommendations? I'm looking to spend up to $2000, and I'm really not sure what I should be looking for. I've played one thus far in the $1500 range and I wasn't all that impressed. But maybe I don't know what I'm looking for.

Thanks in advance.

Griz
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 1
ren
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ren
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08/17/2007 3:22 pm
I'm no expert here, but I've got an Alvarez Yairi which I got used but would have been more like $1500 - beautiful feel and finish. A friend of mine has a higher spec Alvarez and it's sweet too.

Check out Alvarez - I'm not up on the model range, so can't give you more than that dude... enjoy the hunt! :)

Check out my music, video, lessons & backing tracks here![br]https://www.renhimself.com

# 2
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,312
ChristopherSchlegel
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Joined: 08/09/05
Posts: 8,312
08/17/2007 4:15 pm
Personal preference here, but I love the La Patrie series by Lasido:
http://www.lasido.com/lapatriee.htm

I have two of them, an Etude standard and a Hybrid Concert Cutaway (scroll down a bit):
http://www.truthagainsttheworld.com/Tools/

Typically, if you are not used to them, classical guitars seem kind of "clunky". They can take some getting used to. But, still, look for something that "fits" your hands and body (torso, arms, lap) and is not uncomfortable. Most have a totally flat (zero radius) fretboard and fairly high action. They don't have to, but many do. It can be altered somewhat, but it really is a different beast. Look for one with decently low action to start with, a re-inforced neck (not all have truss rods), and an even fretboard and guitar top. Especially around the bridge, make sure it's nice and flat and the strings aren't already pulling the bridge up and making a little hump from the pressure.

My Hybrid is named as such because it has a small radius (slight curve to the fretboard). And both of the La Patries are very strong in the bass range and round and mellow in the treble. I like that response. Many classicals have too "dull" or "flat" sounding bass end for my taste. And then the treble range sounds too thin or bright.

Also, consider getting a classical with electronics/pickup already built in if you want that option. It's better than trying to install that stuff later on. My Etude is non electric and the Hybrid is with electronics built in.

Hope this helps.
Christopher Schlegel
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# 3
Gargy
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Gargy
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08/17/2007 6:40 pm
I'm with Ren on the alvarez. I first started playing on a classical guitar, and although I prefer steel stringed instruments I must admit that Alvarez makes a darn nice guitar.
# 4
grizzlymint
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grizzlymint
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08/18/2007 4:51 am
Thank you for the tips fellas.

CS: I'm surprised to hear you say that they typically have a flat fret board. If I recall, the one I've played had an almost LP like fret board and really gave me a problem when I was trying to fret with my thumb. I will take a look at both Alvarez and Lasid if possible.

Thanks again all. :)
Let your soul shine. Its better than sunshine. Its better than moonshine. Damn sure better than rain.
# 5

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