Polychords


dvenetian
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dvenetian
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05/16/2007 3:15 pm
This thread might get very interesting in response to Polychords......
Just what exactly is a Polychord???
Polychords are created when two guitarists play two different chords simultaneously, producing a new chord.
Let's use a simple chordal triad as an example (Root, 3rd and 5th intervals).
Combining an Am triad (A-C-E) with a C triad (C-E-G) forms an Am7 chord (A-C-E-G).
There are multiple combinations that can be created.
Here's another,
a C triad and an F triad forms an FMaj9 chord (F-A-C-E-G).
Experiment the possibilities and see what you come up with.........
# 1
equator
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equator
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05/16/2007 5:12 pm
Polychords are large chords that can contain six or more tones. On the piano you play a chord with the left hand and another chord (called Upper Structure) with the right hand.
You can play the upper structure over any chord quality, (major, minor, etc) but; in jazz practice the upper structures are commonly played over a Dominant chord.

An example would be a G13(#11) Polychord:
G7=[G,B,D,F] and A=[A,C#,E]

G13(#11)=[G,B,D.F,A,C#,E]

Usually other instrument plays the bass tones and the guitar plays the upper structures, however; you do not need the assistance of other instrument to play Polychords on the guitar. You can leave the 5th out of the Dominant chord. Here are a few G13(#11) voicings:

e----------0--------------0--------------12------------------------------
B----------0--------------2--------------12------------------------------
G----------0--------------4--------------10------------------------------
D----------3--------------3--------------11------------------------------
A----------4--------------0--------------10------------------------------
E----------3--------------3----------------------------------------------


Hope it makes sense.
Someday I`ll play like in my dreams.

equator's Music Page.

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# 2
ren
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ren
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05/17/2007 11:34 am
I use Polychordal ideas in some of my playing - tapping one triad with one hand, and another with the other etc.

Also, not an actual polychord, but I like starting to sweep one arpeggio and then I'll slide up to a different (but complimentary) key for the second octave - just sweeping straight through. The sweep is quick enough that it's one fluid motion across both.

Just a couple of related thoughts....

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# 3
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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05/17/2007 2:36 pm
Originally Posted by: equatorPolychords are large chords that can contain six or more tones. On the piano you play a chord with the left hand and another chord (called Upper Structure) with the right hand....[/quote]
Great info in your post. :)

The part about the "upper structure" was a great point. I want to add that there are two different types of polychord notations.

- one with a slash like G/A, indicating a G major chord with an A note in the bass.
- one with a straight line like a fraction. More like:
[U]G[/U]
A

The second indicates a G major chord over an A major chord (or at least the root and third - not only the root).
[QUOTE=ren]I use Polychordal ideas in some of my playing - tapping one triad with one hand, and another with the other etc.

Great point, ren! This is done quite frequently and more easily on the piano. I do it all the time to get jazz voicings.

Your sweeping idea is also a great one! I also do that. It's very helpful in quickly suggesting or outlining all the tones implied in a polychord or upper structure harmonic idea.
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# 4
equator
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equator
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05/17/2007 2:54 pm
I agree with the two previous posts, and I believe that a lot of good info can be learned from there.
The only thing I do not agree completely is the part about two polychordal notations, for I am positive that they are two separate things.
The chord notated with the slash is called Slash Chord or more properly Hybrid Chord.
The chord notated as a fraction refers to the actual Polychord type.
Other than that everything is of useful information.
Someday I`ll play like in my dreams.

equator's Music Page.

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# 5
pizzicatopicker
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pizzicatopicker
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05/18/2007 3:34 pm
Yeah, this thread kind of reminds of me of something. When I've I'm jamming, I might want to throw in a chord on the very last beat to end things off on a pretty note. I.E., playing a F#m7 over an A maj, or an Am7 over a C maj. This leads to some very interesting results, so I suggest that you guys check it out. Let me know what you think. :eek:
# 6

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