Theory Quiz


Julian Vickers
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Julian Vickers
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03/31/2007 1:22 pm
Originally Posted by: PlatonicShredI don't know about guru...but, you've got to know your theory. Or rather, I have to know mine---otherwise they'd beat me up here! Ha ha.

.


I almost set my theory thugs on you :cool:
Miracle Blade 4: Gibs on touch.
# 1
ChristopherSchlegel
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ChristopherSchlegel
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03/31/2007 1:28 pm
Neat thread! Just a few clarifications.
Originally Posted by: Julian Vickers
2. The neapolitan 6th chord is usually played as the first inversion of a major chord on the b2 of the major key. It can function as a II chord before going to a V.[/quote]
While is does function as a subdominant, preparing for the arrival of the V, as Julian Vickers correctly notes, it can also function in a more "modern way" (especially in jazz & even blues & rock) as a tritone substitution for the V chord itself.
[QUOTE=Julian Vickers]
4. Voice leading is where one plays chords with the top note of the chord suggesting a melody.

Voice leading is regarding all the notes that comprise a chord or a whole piece of music as one note of a continuous "voice". As you move to the next chord you regard each note as moving to the next corresponding note in that next chord.

Say you have a C major chord spelled low to high: C, E, G,
Then the next chord is G major spelled low to high: B, D, G

The bottom "voice" moves from C to B, the middle voice moves from E to D & the top voice remains stationary at G. Notice that the bottom voice moves down a half step, middle voice moves down a whole step (direct motion between these 2 - down in the same direction) & the top voice being stationary is oblique motion to give it even more variety. Keep in mind that minimal movement is not always the "rule" or "goal" but it helps to think that way to start with when you are learning.

If I just moved from a C E G up or down to a G B D, then all of my voices would merely go up or down a fifth (not to mention a great deal of "voice crossing" which can be bad depending on the context). I would have no independent voice motion & thus no justification for using more than one note at a time. The other voices would be merely "shadowing" or "mimicing" not voices in their own right.

"Smooth" voice leading is the "goal" of well-constructed music. This is a VERY simple example but it is the basic idea & has amazingly far reaching implications.

Many theorists & composers also regard voice leading as not merely a chordal analysis tool but an essential way of creating independent & yet interweaving melodies. This is very true in Baroque (Bach), Classical (Beethoven) & much Romantic (Brahms) music. For although at any time you can isolate a chord based on all the notes that are sounding at one time the more important thing is that each voice carried it own melodic thread. So if you have (like Bach did in many of his classic 4 part chorales) a piece that all the way through uses four note chords it is constructed in a way that if you follow say the top note of every chord ("the top voice") you will find a complete melody; & likewise for the other 3 voices.
Christopher Schlegel
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# 2
PlatonicShred
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PlatonicShred
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03/31/2007 1:30 pm
Originally Posted by: Julian VickersI almost set my theory thugs on you :cool:


I read your profile, and I think it's really cool that you're doing the whole jazz thing.
Back In Black isn't a song. It's a divine call that gets channeled through five righteous dudes every thousand years or so. That's why dragons and sea monsters don't exist anymore.
# 3
PlatonicShred
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PlatonicShred
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03/31/2007 1:33 pm
Originally Posted by: CSchlegelNeat thread! Just a few clarifications.

While is does function as a subdominant, preparing for the arrival of the V, as Julian Vickers correctly notes, it can also function in a more "modern way" (especially in jazz & even blues & rock) as a tritone substitution for the V chord itself.

Voice leading is regarding all the notes that comprise a chord or a whole piece of music as one note of a continuous "voice". As you move to the next chord you regard each note as moving to the next corresponding note in that next chord.

Say you have a C major chord spelled low to high: C, E, G,
Then the next chord is G major spelled low to high: B, D, G

The bottom "voice" moves from C to B, the middle voice moves from E to D & the top voice remains stationary at G. Notice that the bottom voice moves down a half step, middle voice moves down a whole step (direct motion between these 2 - down in the same direction) & the top voice being stationary is oblique motion to give it even more variety. Keep in mind that minimal movement is not always the "rule" or "goal" but it helps to think that way to start with when you are learning.

If I just moved from a C E G up or down to a G B D, then all of my voices would merely go up or down a fifth (not to mention a great deal of "voice crossing" which can be bad depending on the context). I would have no independent voice motion & thus no justification for using more than one note at a time. The other voices would be merely "shadowing" or "mimicing" not voices in their own right.

"Smooth" voice leading is the "goal" of well-constructed music. This is a VERY simple example but it is the basic idea & has amazingly far reaching implications.

Many theorists & composers also regard voice leading as not merely a chordal analysis tool but an essential way of creating independent & yet interweaving melodies. This is very true in Baroque (Bach), Classical (Beethoven) & much Romantic (Brahms) music. For although at any time you can isolate a chord based on all the notes that are sounding at one time the more important thing is that each voice carried it own melodic thread. So if you have (like Bach did in many of his classic 4 part chorales) a piece that all the way through uses four note chords it is constructed in a way that if you follow say the top note of every chord ("the top voice") you will find a complete melody; & likewise for the other 3 voices.


w00tsauce.
Back In Black isn't a song. It's a divine call that gets channeled through five righteous dudes every thousand years or so. That's why dragons and sea monsters don't exist anymore.
# 4
Julian Vickers
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Julian Vickers
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04/02/2007 8:25 am
Originally Posted by: PlatonicShredI read your profile, and I think it's really cool that you're doing the whole jazz thing.


Cheers man, I started learning guitar for the meta and rock, now I'm a jazz rocker :cool:
Have you played any jazz?
Miracle Blade 4: Gibs on touch.
# 5
PlatonicShred
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PlatonicShred
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04/02/2007 8:40 am
Originally Posted by: Julian VickersCheers man, I started learning guitar for the meta and rock, now I'm a jazz rocker :cool:
Have you played any jazz?


Of course! I love jazz.
Back In Black isn't a song. It's a divine call that gets channeled through five righteous dudes every thousand years or so. That's why dragons and sea monsters don't exist anymore.
# 6
dvenetian
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dvenetian
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04/02/2007 11:00 am
Interval Quiz
How many scales/modes can you name when the interval(s) are changed from the original model scale interval(s) below?

PART A
Notes of The C Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1a) with flattened 6th and 7th intervals?

2a) with flattened 3rd, 6th and 7th intervals?

3a) with a flattened 3rd interval?

PART B
Notes of The G Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1b) with flattened 3rd and 7th intervals?

2b) with a flattened 6th interval?

3b) with a sharpened 4th and flattened 7th interval?

PART C
Notes of The Bb Natural minor Scale 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7

1c) with a flattened 2nd interval?

2c) with sharpened b6th and b7th intervals?

3c) with a flattened 5th interval?
# 7
Julian Vickers
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Julian Vickers
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04/03/2007 3:58 am
Originally Posted by: dvenetianInterval Quiz
How many scales/modes can you name when the interval(s) are changed from the original model scale interval(s) below?

PART A
Notes of The C Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1a) with flattened 6th and 7th intervals?

2a) with flattened 3rd, 6th and 7th intervals?

3a) with a flattened 3rd interval?

PART B
Notes of The G Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1b) with flattened 3rd and 7th intervals?

2b) with a flattened 6th interval?

3b) with a sharpened 4th and flattened 7th interval?

PART C
Notes of The Bb Natural minor Scale 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7

1c) with a flattened 2nd interval?

2c) with sharpened b6th and b7th intervals?

3c) with a flattened 5th interval?


I'll keep the answers hidden this time:

Part A

1a)
C Mixolydian b6 scale (5th mode of F melodic minor scale)
2a)
C Aelolian Scale (6th mode of Eb major scale)
3a)
C Melodic Minor

Part B

1b)
G Dorian (second mode of F major)
2b)
Probably the G bebop major scale (it has a b6 passing tone)
3b)
G Lydian Dominant (4th mode of D melodic minor)

Part C

1c)
Bb Phrygian scale
2c)
Bb melodic minor
3c)
Bb Locrian #2 (6th mode of Db melodic minor)

I probably got some wrong cause I didn't double check :o
Miracle Blade 4: Gibs on touch.
# 8
dvenetian
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dvenetian
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04/06/2007 9:42 am
Sorry Friends. This quiz may lack clarity, or is too long winded to be any fun. I'll post what I came up with to show some connections.
Originally Posted by: dvenetianInterval Quiz
How many scales/modes can you name when the interval(s) are changed from the original model scale interval(s) below?

PART A
Notes of The C Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1a) with flattened 6th and 7th intervals?
Notes: C-D-E-F-G-G#/Ab-A#/Bb.
Scales/Modes= F Melodic minor (Ascending), D Locrian #2, G# Lydian Augmented, E Super Locrian

2a) with flattened 3rd, 6th and 7th intervals?
Notes: C-D-D#/Eb-F-G-G#/Ab-A#/Bb.
Scales/Modes= Eb Ionian, F Dorian, G Phrygian, Ab Lydian, Bb Mixolydian, C Aeolian, D Locrian

3a) with a flattened 3rd interval?
Notes: C-D-D#/Eb-F-G-A-B.
Scales/Modes= C Melodic minor (Ascending), A Locrian #2, D# Lydian Augmented, B Super Locrian

PART B
Notes of The G Major Scale 1-2-3-4-5-6-7

1b) with flattened 3rd and 7th intervals?
Notes: G-A-A#/Bb-C-D-E-F
Scales/Modes= F Ionian, G Dorian, A Phrygian, Bb Lydian, C Mixolydian, D Aeolian, E Locrian

2b) with a flattened 6th interval?
Notes: G-A-B-C-D-D#/Eb-F#
Scales/Modes= C Lydian Diminished

3b) with a sharpened 4th and flattened 7th interval?
Notes: G-A-B-C#/Db-D-E-F
Scales/Modes= D Melodic minor (Ascending), B Locrian #2, F Lydian Augmented, C# Super Locrian

PART C
Notes of The Bb Natural minor Scale 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7

1c) with a flattened 2nd interval?
Notes: A#/Bb-B-C#/Db-D#/Eb-F-F#/Gb-G#/Ab
Scales/Modes= F# Ionian, G# Dorian, A# Phrygian, B Lydian, C# Mixolydian, D# Aeolian, E#(F) Locrian

2c) with sharpened b6th and b7th intervals?
Notes: Bb-C-Db-Eb-F-G-A
Scales/Modes= Bb Melodic minor (Ascending), G Locrian #2, Db Lydian Augmented, A Super Locrian

3c) with a flattened 5th interval?
Notes: Bb-C-Db-Eb-E-Gb-Ab
Scales/Modes= Same as (2c) with the notes moved up three half steps.

# 9
Julian Vickers
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Julian Vickers
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04/06/2007 9:56 am
So I pretty much got them all right then. Except for the lydian diminished one, not sure about that scale.
Miracle Blade 4: Gibs on touch.
# 10

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