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Jolly McJollyson
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Joined: 09/07/03
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Jolly McJollyson
Chick Magnet
Joined: 09/07/03
Posts: 5,457
01/15/2006 7:57 pm
Originally Posted by: MSF06Thanks for the response.

I do know the rules and mainly I was thinking out loud. Let me put it this way, why would it different if I play a Db major and say F# instead of Gb would it be different? You still need to move a finger to the same fret and you still get the same sound. I understand that it is an augmented second, not a diminished third, I just wonder WHY it is what it is :D

I did a search for the rules to try and find out but nothing showed up. If you know of a good book or even a web site that explains the rules rather then just letting you know what the rules are I would appreciate it if you could let me know.

I have a problem of trying to over analyze things at times and this is one of those things.

MSF

Well, let's look at it this way. Any form of E to any form of F is some kind of second. E-F 1-2. Any form of E to any form of G is some kind of third: E-F-G 1-2-3. The difference between an augmented second and a minor third lies in functionality. An augmented second will be seen in fully diminished leading tone seventh chords such as one would find in a lot of classical/romantic/impressionistic music among the other styles that get lumped in "classical." I misspoke earlier when I said "diminished third," I meant "minor third."
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