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Let It Be: Gear & Tone

 

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Let It Be

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First let's talk a little bit about the gear and tones that I'll be using for this song, but as always you have to remember that you rarely need any specific gear to be able to play a specific song. It's gonna sound more like the original if you have the same gear, but that doesn't mean it can't be different in a cool way, when you play it on whatever gear you have. So always keep that in mind when we're talking gear.

I'll be using my steel-string, Martin-style VKV acoustic for covering the piano parts, and I'll be picking the strings with my fingers. If you have long enough nails to pick with them, that will sound really nice too. I'm getting the tone that you hear in the video from a combination of an overhead mic and my built-in Fishman pickup. You can use any kind of acoustic guitar for these parts - even a nylon string guitar - and it can even work on electric if you dial a nice clean tone and pick it gently.

Then for the electric lead guitar, I'll be using my Gibson 335 on the bridge pickup. I'm running that through a modeled VOX AC30 amp turned up till it gets a medium overdriven tone. You can find the right amount of gain by reducing until it sounds too clean and then increasing it until it gets too distorted! Then in between those two you can find the sweet spot on any piece of gear, whether that's your amp or a pedal you're using for the overdrive.

On the studio version of this song the guitar has a bit of a "nasaly" sound. This may very well have to do with how they recorded it, but it can be fun to imitate live. I use an EQ pedal for this, and I've boosted the area around 800k quite a bit. But that's by no means necessary- just a fun detail, if you're interested.

Apart from that I'm just using a little bit of spring reverb. You want just enough that your tone isn't super dry, and not so much that starts to be very noticeable!