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Using Chord Tones To Solo

 

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Joe Pass Style Series 4

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The first approach we will take is to play only chord tones. Played in a swing 1/8th note rhythm, this results in jazz arpeggios! Also, since this is jazz we are going to play the extend tones as well. These are the 7th & 9ths of the chord. Using upper chord tones is an essential characteristic of jazz. This is because many times jazz songs use these types of upper chord tones (or extended harmony notes) in the actual melody of the song. As a result, they are frequently included in the chords and overall chord progressions of jazz songs.

This is why jazz sounds the way it does and why it sounds distinctly different from other styles of music. This is also why sometime other styles of music can have a "jazzy" sound; because they use some of these notes and chords, but not all the way through the music.

The first chord is a C major 7 chord used as a I chord. Notice the use of the 7th scale degree.

The second chord is an A7 flat 9 used as a VI chord (or a V of ii). Notice the use of the 7th and flat 9th scale degrees.

The third chord is a D minor 7 chord used as a ii chord. Notice the use of the 7th scale degree.

The fourth chord is a G7 flat 13 chord used as a V chord. Notice the use of the 7th and 9th scale degrees.

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