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A Minor Scale for Beginners: Lesson 2

 

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A Minor Scale for Beginners

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Remember, the minor scale is formed by using this formula:

1st note, whole step, 2nd note, half step, 3rd note, whole step, 4th note, whole step, 5th note, half step, 6th note, whole step, 7th note, whole step, 8th note (which is one octave higher than the first note).

In the first lesson we put it all on one string to see it in a linear pattern: all on one string. We did this in order to more easily see the intervals of the minor scale on the guitar.

A - whole step - B - half step - C - whole step - D - whole step - E - half step - F - whole step - G - whole step - A

This is similar to how the notes of a scale are arranged on a piano: in a straight line from the left to the right. But on the guitar we can play these same notes in different physical locations. So, we take the scale degrees 4, 5, and 6 and move them one string over and five frets back and they are conveniently on the same frets as the scale degrees 1, 2, and 3. We do this twice with the 7 and octave, one string over and five frets back, and we arrive at a patterns that makes it much easier to play in one position using open strings and without having to move our hand all the way up and down the neck!

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