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Dorian

 

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Modes of the Major Scale

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In this lesson we'll learn the dorian mode.

We started with the A Major scale and number the scale degrees:

A(1) - B(2) - C#(3) - D(4) - E(5) - F#(6) - G#(7) - A(1)

We are going to use the exact same group of notes, but this time we are going to let the second note of the scale (B) a chance to start the scale. Note the formula of intervals shifts from the original one (WS is whole step or two frets; HS is half step or one fret):

A Major scale: A - WS - B - WS - C# - HS - D - WS - E - WS - F# - WS - G# - HS - A

1st - WS - 2nd - WS - Major 3rd - HS - 4th - WS - 5th - WS - Major 6th - WS - Major 7th - HS - 1st

Letting the 2nd scale note (B) start the scale results in the second mode, named, dorian. Watch for the shift in the formula of intervals in between it's degrees.

Dorian

B - WS - C# - HS - D - WS - E - WS - F# - WS - G# - HS - A - WS - B

This means we have a different set of intervals and thus a different sound.

1st - WS - 2nd - HS - Minor 3rd - WS - 4th - WS - 5th - WS - Major 6th - HS - Minor 7th - WS - 1st

First we'll play dorian in one octave, then we'll play it using a 3-note per string pattern that will cover all six strings. In the next lesson we'll experiment with playing the mode over a backing track that uses chords to help highlight the sound of dorian.

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