Tuning down too eflat

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nigelcoughlin

Registered User

Joined: 04/10/12

Posts: 16

I tuned my guitar down too Eflat and notice a lot more buzzing from the G(?) string. Sorry, I dont really know the strings. The 4th string down. Is this a problem that can be fixed by changing the action?

Also. I wanted to put heavier gauge strings on my guitar but since I got the guitar i noticed it said I had too add more springs too the tremelo if i wanted too go with heavier gauge strings. Is this really a requirement and will I also have too change the action if I go too heavier gauge strings?

Any help will be appreciated.

#1

I tuned my guitar down too Eflat and notice a lot more buzzing from the G(?) string. Sorry, I dont really know the strings. The 4th string down. Is this a problem that can be fixed by changing the action?

Also. I wanted to put heavier gauge strings on my guitar but since I got the guitar i noticed it said I had too add more springs too the tremelo if i wanted too go with heavier gauge strings. Is this really a requirement and will I also have too change the action if I go too heavier gauge strings?

Any help will be appreciated.

aschleman

Registered User

Joined: 04/26/05

Posts: 2032

by "E flat" do you mean a half step down from standard EADGBe? this tuning is commonly known simply as "half step down" when you say E flat.... it can be interpreted as an open tuning to the E flat chord...

if so, when you release string tension from the neck you will notice some buzzing. heavier guage strings should help the matter or you may need to adjust the truss rod. try the heavier guage strings first and you shold notice a big difference.

#2

by "E flat" do you mean a half step down from standard EADGBe? this tuning is commonly known simply as "half step down" when you say E flat.... it can be interpreted as an open tuning to the E flat chord...

if so, when you release string tension from the neck you will notice some buzzing. heavier guage strings should help the matter or you may need to adjust the truss rod. try the heavier guage strings first and you shold notice a big difference.

nigelcoughlin

Registered User

Joined: 04/10/12

Posts: 16

Ya, Sorry. Down half a step. I had heard it was also called EFlat tuning.


Do you have any idea on my other question regarding the Tremelo Springs and the need too adjust action just due too heavier gauge strings? Will the larger strings cause a buzzing on their own?

#3

Ya, Sorry. Down half a step. I had heard it was also called EFlat tuning.


Do you have any idea on my other question regarding the Tremelo Springs and the need too adjust action just due too heavier gauge strings? Will the larger strings cause a buzzing on their own?

aschleman

Registered User

Joined: 04/26/05

Posts: 2032

ah, sorry didn't read the whole post...

what happens is: between the bridge and the neck there is X amount of tension which is provided by how tightly tuned the strings are... when you put thicker guaged strings on, it takes more tension to bring these thicker strings to the same note as it would for lighter strings... therein, you're changing the amount of pull on the bridge/tremolo. this actually will pull the bridge forward and throw everything out of whack... now, if you're going up on size... say, .11's to .12's it shouldn't make a HUGE difference... but if you're going from a set of .10's up to a set of Ernie Ball Slinky top Heavy Bottom .11's... where the bass strings are very thick... you're going to need to tension.

so, if you're planning on going up to bigger guage strings i would suggest adding 2 more springs. chances are your guitar came stock with only 3 springs... i always use 5 trem springs becuase i don't use the trem often and it helps with tuning stability.

i would suggest that if you're planning on doing this you just take it into the guitar shop when you buy the strings and have the store do it if you're not comfortable...... also, when yo're making a large string change you can throw the intonation off as well... another reason to take it to a shop.

#4

ah, sorry didn't read the whole post...

what happens is: between the bridge and the neck there is X amount of tension which is provided by how tightly tuned the strings are... when you put thicker guaged strings on, it takes more tension to bring these thicker strings to the same note as it would for lighter strings... therein, you're changing the amount of pull on the bridge/tremolo. this actually will pull the bridge forward and throw everything out of whack... now, if you're going up on size... say, .11's to .12's it shouldn't make a HUGE difference... but if you're going from a set of .10's up to a set of Ernie Ball Slinky top Heavy Bottom .11's... where the bass strings are very thick... you're going to need to tension.

so, if you're planning on going up to bigger guage strings i would suggest adding 2 more springs. chances are your guitar came stock with only 3 springs... i always use 5 trem springs becuase i don't use the trem often and it helps with tuning stability.

i would suggest that if you're planning on doing this you just take it into the guitar shop when you buy the strings and have the store do it if you're not comfortable...... also, when yo're making a large string change you can throw the intonation off as well... another reason to take it to a shop.

hunter1801

Registered User

Joined: 01/26/05

Posts: 1331

Originally Posted by: aschleman
by "E flat" do you mean a half step down from standard EADGBe? this tuning is commonly known simply as "half step down" when you say E flat.... it can be interpreted as an open tuning to the E flat chord...


I've actually always considered "E flat" the more proper way to say "half step down".

#5

Originally Posted by: aschleman
by "E flat" do you mean a half step down from standard EADGBe? this tuning is commonly known simply as "half step down" when you say E flat.... it can be interpreted as an open tuning to the E flat chord...


I've actually always considered "E flat" the more proper way to say "half step down".

aschleman

Registered User

Joined: 04/26/05

Posts: 2032

Originally Posted by: hunter1801
I've actually always considered "E flat" the more proper way to say "half step down".


either way... in my cirlce, that's the first time i had heard it used referring to standard half step down. makes sense though.

#6

Originally Posted by: hunter1801
I've actually always considered "E flat" the more proper way to say "half step down".


either way... in my cirlce, that's the first time i had heard it used referring to standard half step down. makes sense though.

G1619T

Full Access

Joined: 03/15/11

Posts: 34

Half-Step Down

Hi Ya'll,
Here in South Texas this tuning is pretty popular. A lot of Texas Blues-Rock bands that want that chunky Stevie Ray Vaughn or Los Lonely Boys sound, for example, use strings that are around .013 in. (1st) to .056 (6th) or so for great Fender blues tones. Lowering the string tension helps with bends etc. (remember the guitar neck can have anywhere from 170 to 220 lbs of pressure on it) and as we get older, at lest for me, it's a little easier to sing. I remember not long ago, about 40 years ago, recording engineers would record the music a half step down for the singers and then (sometimes) bring it back up to speed at the final cut.
Regards,
G1619T

#7

Half-Step Down

Hi Ya'll,
Here in South Texas this tuning is pretty popular. A lot of Texas Blues-Rock bands that want that chunky Stevie Ray Vaughn or Los Lonely Boys sound, for example, use strings that are around .013 in. (1st) to .056 (6th) or so for great Fender blues tones. Lowering the string tension helps with bends etc. (remember the guitar neck can have anywhere from 170 to 220 lbs of pressure on it) and as we get older, at lest for me, it's a little easier to sing. I remember not long ago, about 40 years ago, recording engineers would record the music a half step down for the singers and then (sometimes) bring it back up to speed at the final cut.
Regards,
G1619T