Advice: "ringing" d string

Guitar Tricks Forum > Technique and Style > Advice: "ringing" d string

jvctele

Registered User

Joined: 02/06/06

Posts: 4

Is there anyone out there that can offer me some advice?
When picking the G string I've found that the D string vibrates and makes itself heard at a very low volume. I am not touching the D string. (I seems it wants to join in with a little "vibrating" backup... if you know what I mean.)
Is it proper to do a little palm muting to deaden the string? Is it a bad technique?
I've tried to extend my index finger but it is so hard to change my picking style. Any one else had this problem?

#1

Is there anyone out there that can offer me some advice?
When picking the G string I've found that the D string vibrates and makes itself heard at a very low volume. I am not touching the D string. (I seems it wants to join in with a little "vibrating" backup... if you know what I mean.)
Is it proper to do a little palm muting to deaden the string? Is it a bad technique?
I've tried to extend my index finger but it is so hard to change my picking style. Any one else had this problem?

nevermore27

Registered User

Joined: 08/05/11

Posts: 15

d string cont

I think I may have a similar problem with my acoustic. When I play single note
lines on the high e or b string, the other strings will hum along- as well as the guitar body. Hope your issue is fixed soon.

#2

d string cont

I think I may have a similar problem with my acoustic. When I play single note
lines on the high e or b string, the other strings will hum along- as well as the guitar body. Hope your issue is fixed soon.

Carl King

Full Access

Joined: 10/08/07

Posts: 83

Hey jvctele,

Some palm-muting is a great way to mute extra strings! Keeping strings from ringing is a life-long technique that you'll use forever. There are so many ways to do it.

With your fretting hand, you can use your extra fingers to lay them across the strings you don't want to ring. For example, if you're playing on the G string, the tip of your finger can always overlap the string you're fretting just a little bit to mute the adjacent D string. And the rest of your finger can be used to mute the B and E. This is how guitarists seem to be able to wildly swing their picking hand at the guitar and hit only the notes they want.

So to keep that B string from ringing, use the tip of your fretting fingers to lightly mute it. That should help once you get the hang of it.

It's a never-ending process. You'll find that as you develop, for every note you play, you'll be finding some way to keep several other strings from ringing. There are so many tricks -- some guitarists even use extra fingers on their right hand while picking, and even using their pick to mute adjacent strings. But this will all become a habit over time, so there's no need to rush it. Just conquer one at a time.

Hope that helps!

-Carl.
Carl King
GuitarTricks Director / Producer

#3

Hey jvctele,

Some palm-muting is a great way to mute extra strings! Keeping strings from ringing is a life-long technique that you'll use forever. There are so many ways to do it.

With your fretting hand, you can use your extra fingers to lay them across the strings you don't want to ring. For example, if you're playing on the G string, the tip of your finger can always overlap the string you're fretting just a little bit to mute the adjacent D string. And the rest of your finger can be used to mute the B and E. This is how guitarists seem to be able to wildly swing their picking hand at the guitar and hit only the notes they want.

So to keep that B string from ringing, use the tip of your fretting fingers to lightly mute it. That should help once you get the hang of it.

It's a never-ending process. You'll find that as you develop, for every note you play, you'll be finding some way to keep several other strings from ringing. There are so many tricks -- some guitarists even use extra fingers on their right hand while picking, and even using their pick to mute adjacent strings. But this will all become a habit over time, so there's no need to rush it. Just conquer one at a time.

Hope that helps!

-Carl.
Carl King
GuitarTricks Director / Producer

compart1

Full Access

Joined: 06/27/09

Posts: 1391

If you playing a
D on the G string, the D string will resonate.

You can check this out doing manual tuning..

This is not a scientific statement, just an observation on my part.

#4

If you playing a
D on the G string, the D string will resonate.

You can check this out doing manual tuning..

This is not a scientific statement, just an observation on my part.

jvctele

Registered User

Joined: 02/06/06

Posts: 4

Thanks for the advice folks. Carl basically nailed it and I do have to change the way I fret the G string or do some palm muting. I was just wondering if it was "bad technique".

#5

Thanks for the advice folks. Carl basically nailed it and I do have to change the way I fret the G string or do some palm muting. I was just wondering if it was "bad technique".

gdengelbrecht

Registered User

Joined: 07/07/09

Posts: 34

Originally Posted by: jvctele
Is there anyone out there that can offer me some advice?
When picking the G string I've found that the D string vibrates and makes itself heard at a very low volume. I am not touching the D string. (I seems it wants to join in with a little "vibrating" backup... if you know what I mean.)
Is it proper to do a little palm muting to deaden the string? Is it a bad technique?
I've tried to extend my index finger but it is so hard to change my picking style. Any one else had this problem?

A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

#6

Originally Posted by: jvctele
Is there anyone out there that can offer me some advice?
When picking the G string I've found that the D string vibrates and makes itself heard at a very low volume. I am not touching the D string. (I seems it wants to join in with a little "vibrating" backup... if you know what I mean.)
Is it proper to do a little palm muting to deaden the string? Is it a bad technique?
I've tried to extend my index finger but it is so hard to change my picking style. Any one else had this problem?

A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

James Sheasgreen

Registered User

Joined: 04/05/12

Posts: 19

Originally Posted by: gdengelbrecht
A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.

I agree with this. You should be able to mute out any excess ringing without even thinking aboit it once you perfect the technique. It especially helps when playing with high gain.

#7

Originally Posted by: gdengelbrecht
A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.

I agree with this. You should be able to mute out any excess ringing without even thinking aboit it once you perfect the technique. It especially helps when playing with high gain.

Kali7676

Registered User

Joined: 04/25/12

Posts: 1

this should help...

i found that palm muting works the best because then you can use your index finger for other notes. its also easier to keep consistant. Thats jusy what i found.

#8

this should help...

i found that palm muting works the best because then you can use your index finger for other notes. its also easier to keep consistant. Thats jusy what i found.

hunter1801

Registered User

Joined: 01/26/05

Posts: 1313

I actually struggle with this, but only when I'm playing on my classical guitar. Don't really have the option to palm mute since I play with my fingers and resting my palm on the strings isn't an option.

#9

I actually struggle with this, but only when I'm playing on my classical guitar. Don't really have the option to palm mute since I play with my fingers and resting my palm on the strings isn't an option.

jvctele

Registered User

Joined: 02/06/06

Posts: 4

Originally Posted by: gdengelbrecht
A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.



I also like this suggestion. Thank you.

#10

Originally Posted by: gdengelbrecht
A good thing will be to apply the thumb muting technique to have the lower string muted and not make any noise. This will be very beneficial especially when doing bends and vibrato.



I also like this suggestion. Thank you.