Emotional soloing

Guitar Tricks Forum > Technique and Style > Emotional soloing

metal iz good

Registered User

Joined: 05/29/10

Posts: 44

Hey guys, I've been trying to get a more emotional style into my solos, not just lightening fast shredding! Any tips?

#1

Hey guys, I've been trying to get a more emotional style into my solos, not just lightening fast shredding! Any tips?

JJ90

Full Access

Joined: 01/02/11

Posts: 228

There are a lot of things you can use for emotional soloing. For me it works best when I play slow and know what notes to bend which sound good. Sustain these notes well and bend them good and in the right place.

I can give you a lot more tips, but perhaps this video is also helpful ( you don't have to be a subscriber to access this one ).

http://www.guitartricks.com/courselesson.php?input=bT80bzJlNmdkZA==

#2

There are a lot of things you can use for emotional soloing. For me it works best when I play slow and know what notes to bend which sound good. Sustain these notes well and bend them good and in the right place.

I can give you a lot more tips, but perhaps this video is also helpful ( you don't have to be a subscriber to access this one ).

http://www.guitartricks.com/courselesson.php?input=bT80bzJlNmdkZA==

Ben Lindholm

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 02/02/02

Posts: 980

Yup, as Neal says in the video, sustain, vibrato and timing are all very important.

The rest is chord tones, chord tones, chord tones :).

This means you have to know what chords you are playing your solo over, and target notes from those chords. If you know your arpeggios in a few different positions, this isn't too hard.

For example, if you're playing over the chords G, D, C, C - the scale of choice would probably be the G major scale (same notes as Em). The easy way would be to noodle around in the E minor pentatonic scale.

But, if you really want to sound good (like Slash for example), you would use the E minor pentatonic scale (or E natural minor/G major) as a base, or shell, and land on and target notes that are in each chord.

Start by learning the E natural minor scale in the 12th position. Then figure out where the G major, the D major, and the C major arpeggios are in that same position. Those are the notes to target over each one of the chords. You can use the rest of the notes in the scale as passing notes, but really accent the chord tones.

Hope this makes sense. /Ben
My newest tutorials:
Pentatonic Speedster
Funk Lick Library A2
Bat Country
Funk Lick Library A1
Tapping: Level 4
Tapping: Level 3
Alternate Picking: Level 2

Find all of my lessons here:
Complete Lesson Catalog

#3

Yup, as Neal says in the video, sustain, vibrato and timing are all very important.

The rest is chord tones, chord tones, chord tones :).

This means you have to know what chords you are playing your solo over, and target notes from those chords. If you know your arpeggios in a few different positions, this isn't too hard.

For example, if you're playing over the chords G, D, C, C - the scale of choice would probably be the G major scale (same notes as Em). The easy way would be to noodle around in the E minor pentatonic scale.

But, if you really want to sound good (like Slash for example), you would use the E minor pentatonic scale (or E natural minor/G major) as a base, or shell, and land on and target notes that are in each chord.

Start by learning the E natural minor scale in the 12th position. Then figure out where the G major, the D major, and the C major arpeggios are in that same position. Those are the notes to target over each one of the chords. You can use the rest of the notes in the scale as passing notes, but really accent the chord tones.

Hope this makes sense. /Ben
My newest tutorials:
Pentatonic Speedster
Funk Lick Library A2
Bat Country
Funk Lick Library A1
Tapping: Level 4
Tapping: Level 3
Alternate Picking: Level 2

Find all of my lessons here:
Complete Lesson Catalog

Joe Pinnavaia

Registered User

Joined: 04/08/10

Posts: 57

If you are looking for some inspiration check out some Jeff Beck. Love his playing! YouTube has some vids you can check out.

I also agree chord tones are very important and especially if you are playing over changes you can target them on the down beat of each change. This will keep the listener in check and with you melodically plus make you sound like you are telling a story. I think that is a skill that really takes time to develop. Start working over static vamps and build out from there to two chords etc.

Let us know how you're doing.

All the Best,
Joe
http://www.guitarlessonsbuffalony.com

#4

If you are looking for some inspiration check out some Jeff Beck. Love his playing! YouTube has some vids you can check out.

I also agree chord tones are very important and especially if you are playing over changes you can target them on the down beat of each change. This will keep the listener in check and with you melodically plus make you sound like you are telling a story. I think that is a skill that really takes time to develop. Start working over static vamps and build out from there to two chords etc.

Let us know how you're doing.

All the Best,
Joe
http://www.guitarlessonsbuffalony.com

MarcusWiesner

Registered User

Joined: 04/10/11

Posts: 34

use slow legato and phrasing that isn't just really fast, and hit the key notes very hard. You want to punch it into their skull. Playing with a lot of emotion can be conveyed through dynamics, or how loud you play. If you wanna be cool, you back off a little bit or palm-mute. However, if you wanna show your emotions, play loudly.

One way to think of it is to decide what kind of emotion you want to portray. If it is a raw or rough emotion like anger or something, play loud and wail it out.. If it is a sensitive or gentle emotion you are trying to portray, use a lot of finesse- like slurs (legato) and vibrato and fluidity :) Remember all of the most emotional solos you can remember and draw inspiration from that. What sort of sound do those solos have? try to emulate that sound in your own style.

#5

use slow legato and phrasing that isn't just really fast, and hit the key notes very hard. You want to punch it into their skull. Playing with a lot of emotion can be conveyed through dynamics, or how loud you play. If you wanna be cool, you back off a little bit or palm-mute. However, if you wanna show your emotions, play loudly.

One way to think of it is to decide what kind of emotion you want to portray. If it is a raw or rough emotion like anger or something, play loud and wail it out.. If it is a sensitive or gentle emotion you are trying to portray, use a lot of finesse- like slurs (legato) and vibrato and fluidity :) Remember all of the most emotional solos you can remember and draw inspiration from that. What sort of sound do those solos have? try to emulate that sound in your own style.

David Lalumiere

Registered User

Joined: 03/28/11

Posts: 17

Neal's video is nice. I agree that a well done vibrato, bend can add a lot to the emotion in a solo.

There are other technique as well that can add a lot to the emotion of a song. Hammer-ons, pull-offs, thrills, slides, etc. Combining them can make your solo more alive.

#6

Neal's video is nice. I agree that a well done vibrato, bend can add a lot to the emotion in a solo.

There are other technique as well that can add a lot to the emotion of a song. Hammer-ons, pull-offs, thrills, slides, etc. Combining them can make your solo more alive.

goldy54

Registered User

Joined: 07/19/10

Posts: 61

Originally Posted by: metal
Hey guys, I've been trying to get a more emotional style into my solos, not just lightening fast shredding! Any tips?


I totally changed a lot of my shreading licks after watching an interview with David Gilmore (Pink Floyd). He said I am nowhere near as fast as a lot of guitarists out there.....therefore I must make each note count. I'd say he does that extremely well!!! I find it a different mind-set that keeps getting better with time and practice. Let me know how you progress.

#7

Originally Posted by: metal
Hey guys, I've been trying to get a more emotional style into my solos, not just lightening fast shredding! Any tips?


I totally changed a lot of my shreading licks after watching an interview with David Gilmore (Pink Floyd). He said I am nowhere near as fast as a lot of guitarists out there.....therefore I must make each note count. I'd say he does that extremely well!!! I find it a different mind-set that keeps getting better with time and practice. Let me know how you progress.

Dan Acheron

Registered User

Joined: 11/29/10

Posts: 120

One thing that I do is make myself feel the emotion that I want to portray. This helps me add emotion to my playing. If you mix this with the advice others are leaving here then it should add some emotion into your lead playing!

#8

One thing that I do is make myself feel the emotion that I want to portray. This helps me add emotion to my playing. If you mix this with the advice others are leaving here then it should add some emotion into your lead playing!

Marshallmk1

Registered User

Joined: 05/11/11

Posts: 89

Hi...I'm not a very fast player so I've had no choice but to try to build the emotional style of soloing...I find it really helpful to forget about scales sometimes and just fiddle about until I find a lick that works over the chord progressions...combining that with what everyone else has mentioned about slides bends and vibrato it's not that hard to come up with slower but interesting stuff...

Check out a few of my tracks on my bandmix profile...no shredding but as much emotion as I can muster...!!!

http://www.bandmix.co.uk/craigyj/

#9

Hi...I'm not a very fast player so I've had no choice but to try to build the emotional style of soloing...I find it really helpful to forget about scales sometimes and just fiddle about until I find a lick that works over the chord progressions...combining that with what everyone else has mentioned about slides bends and vibrato it's not that hard to come up with slower but interesting stuff...

Check out a few of my tracks on my bandmix profile...no shredding but as much emotion as I can muster...!!!

http://www.bandmix.co.uk/craigyj/

SunKing1

Registered User

Joined: 05/31/11

Posts: 36

I was just going to mention Mr. Gilmour myself... Check out his amazing guitar work on Dark Side of The Moon and Wish You Were Here.
Rocksmith Review // Real Guitar Game
How to Start Playing Guitar

#10

I was just going to mention Mr. Gilmour myself... Check out his amazing guitar work on Dark Side of The Moon and Wish You Were Here.
Rocksmith Review // Real Guitar Game
How to Start Playing Guitar