Help with pull-offs

Guitar Tricks Forum > Technique and Style > Help with pull-offs

gdengelbrecht

Registered User

Joined: 07/07/09

Posts: 34

Originally Posted by: James.Erickson
George,

I understand where you are going with that idea, and I was actually debating whether or not to recommend the all-hammer-on approach. It is the direction that legato is heading for the 21st century guitarist in large part due to Allan Holdsworth (and Marshall Harrison who helps explain it). What have you found with when to start students on this concept?

Personally, I feel that it depends on the student and if they show an interest in developing in that direction, but is that something you teach all your students?

Definitely, I think the student must really be interested in that way of doing it Smilie

I myself isn't too worried about mastering that more difficult way but I find that at least it makes my fingers nice and independent, ready for the standard way.

I actually haven't shown this to any student, which might be a good idea to see how people respond to it.
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

#11

Originally Posted by: James.Erickson
George,

I understand where you are going with that idea, and I was actually debating whether or not to recommend the all-hammer-on approach. It is the direction that legato is heading for the 21st century guitarist in large part due to Allan Holdsworth (and Marshall Harrison who helps explain it). What have you found with when to start students on this concept?

Personally, I feel that it depends on the student and if they show an interest in developing in that direction, but is that something you teach all your students?

Definitely, I think the student must really be interested in that way of doing it Smilie

I myself isn't too worried about mastering that more difficult way but I find that at least it makes my fingers nice and independent, ready for the standard way.

I actually haven't shown this to any student, which might be a good idea to see how people respond to it.
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

James Sheasgreen

Registered User

Joined: 04/05/12

Posts: 19

Pull off Technique

I have found that using barring to do fast pull offs on multiple strings works well and that i get no noise from the strings underneath it. But this is because i use my fretting hand to mute the strings im not playing at all times when im playing lead. You can use the oalm of your thumb to do this. It makes for playing more accurately even with high speeds and gain.

#12

Pull off Technique

I have found that using barring to do fast pull offs on multiple strings works well and that i get no noise from the strings underneath it. But this is because i use my fretting hand to mute the strings im not playing at all times when im playing lead. You can use the oalm of your thumb to do this. It makes for playing more accurately even with high speeds and gain.

James.Erickson

Registered User

Joined: 04/06/09

Posts: 19

Originally Posted by: James
I have found that using barring to do fast pull offs on multiple strings works well and that i get no noise from the strings underneath it. But this is because i use my fretting hand to mute the strings im not playing at all times when im playing lead. You can use the oalm of your thumb to do this. It makes for playing more accurately even with high speeds and gain.


Good job! That sounds like you know how to do the proper technique known as "thumb muting" which uses the thumb of the right hand, the little fingers of the right hand, and the index-finger-bar all to mute the appropriate strings. As you mentioned, this helps your playing be clean even with high gain at high speeds. Smilie

However, if you are having to mute the strings underneath the string that your are executing your pull-offs, then your pull-offs are being performed too drastically. It does not take a large down-sweep of the finger to execute pull-offs effectively. Just a quick snap of the finger will get the volume you need, and without activating the other strings. Hope that helps. I have been studying how to have monster legato for years, and so if you have any more questions, feel free to ask! Smilie

Regards,
James
www.jamesericksonmusic.com

#13

Originally Posted by: James
I have found that using barring to do fast pull offs on multiple strings works well and that i get no noise from the strings underneath it. But this is because i use my fretting hand to mute the strings im not playing at all times when im playing lead. You can use the oalm of your thumb to do this. It makes for playing more accurately even with high speeds and gain.


Good job! That sounds like you know how to do the proper technique known as "thumb muting" which uses the thumb of the right hand, the little fingers of the right hand, and the index-finger-bar all to mute the appropriate strings. As you mentioned, this helps your playing be clean even with high gain at high speeds. Smilie

However, if you are having to mute the strings underneath the string that your are executing your pull-offs, then your pull-offs are being performed too drastically. It does not take a large down-sweep of the finger to execute pull-offs effectively. Just a quick snap of the finger will get the volume you need, and without activating the other strings. Hope that helps. I have been studying how to have monster legato for years, and so if you have any more questions, feel free to ask! Smilie

Regards,
James
www.jamesericksonmusic.com

Joe Pinnavaia

Registered User

Joined: 04/08/10

Posts: 57

I have taught some of my students the hammer technique and it depends on the student and their experience as to how fast they latch on to the technique. For a beginner they lack the hand strength and finger independence required so building the pull offs is where I usually start and refine that.
I that case trill exercises usually work best for building hand strength and synchronicity. The real trick is keeping everything in time with an even tone. I find that some players pull off to hard causing the intonation to go out.

Peace,
Joe

http://www.joepinnavaia.com

#14

I have taught some of my students the hammer technique and it depends on the student and their experience as to how fast they latch on to the technique. For a beginner they lack the hand strength and finger independence required so building the pull offs is where I usually start and refine that.
I that case trill exercises usually work best for building hand strength and synchronicity. The real trick is keeping everything in time with an even tone. I find that some players pull off to hard causing the intonation to go out.

Peace,
Joe

http://www.joepinnavaia.com

gdengelbrecht

Registered User

Joined: 07/07/09

Posts: 34

Originally Posted by: Joe
I have taught some of my students the hammer technique and it depends on the student and their experience as to how fast they latch on to the technique. For a beginner they lack the hand strength and finger independence required so building the pull offs is where I usually start and refine that.
I that case trill exercises usually work best for building hand strength and synchronicity. The real trick is keeping everything in time with an even tone. I find that some players pull off to hard causing the intonation to go out.

Peace,
Joe

http://www.joepinnavaia.com

Cool advice Joe, making sure to have even tone sounds like a great way to improve legato in general!
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

#15

Originally Posted by: Joe
I have taught some of my students the hammer technique and it depends on the student and their experience as to how fast they latch on to the technique. For a beginner they lack the hand strength and finger independence required so building the pull offs is where I usually start and refine that.
I that case trill exercises usually work best for building hand strength and synchronicity. The real trick is keeping everything in time with an even tone. I find that some players pull off to hard causing the intonation to go out.

Peace,
Joe

http://www.joepinnavaia.com

Cool advice Joe, making sure to have even tone sounds like a great way to improve legato in general!
http://www.georgeshredking.com/

http://guitarlessonsinvredenburg.com/

James.Erickson

Registered User

Joined: 04/06/09

Posts: 19

Agreed. Trills are key to developing good legato, but as you mentioned Joe, they must be performed correctly-with proper evenness and tone, or you are ingraining further bad habits. That is something a lot of students do not realize is that either you are ingraining good habits or bad, there is rarely a middle ground. So they slop through exercises and wonder why everything sounds messy. Everyone was there at one point or another in their playing, but thankfully your students have a good teacher.

#16

Agreed. Trills are key to developing good legato, but as you mentioned Joe, they must be performed correctly-with proper evenness and tone, or you are ingraining further bad habits. That is something a lot of students do not realize is that either you are ingraining good habits or bad, there is rarely a middle ground. So they slop through exercises and wonder why everything sounds messy. Everyone was there at one point or another in their playing, but thankfully your students have a good teacher.