Some demos

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Razbo

Full Access

Joined: 03/02/09

Posts: 1562

Hey. I have put together a few demos so far that I have uploaded if anyone is interested.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=1226834

These aren't a guitar showcase by any means, but I play all the instruments and do the vocals. I just tried to get down what was in my head. Smilie Any constructive comments would be much appreciated.

If you listen chronologically, my recording skills seem to be slightly improving. The first thing I learned is that sometimes Less is More when it comes to effects. "One Regret" is supposed to be dank and scuzzy, but I think I was a little heavy handed. Roll Eyes Sarcastic Future remix, I guess.

Anyway, hope somebody like's 'em.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

#1

Hey. I have put together a few demos so far that I have uploaded if anyone is interested.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=1226834

These aren't a guitar showcase by any means, but I play all the instruments and do the vocals. I just tried to get down what was in my head. Smilie Any constructive comments would be much appreciated.

If you listen chronologically, my recording skills seem to be slightly improving. The first thing I learned is that sometimes Less is More when it comes to effects. "One Regret" is supposed to be dank and scuzzy, but I think I was a little heavy handed. Roll Eyes Sarcastic Future remix, I guess.

Anyway, hope somebody like's 'em.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

Slipin Lizard

Registered User

Joined: 11/15/07

Posts: 711

Good effort! There's definitely issues, but to me it sounds more like a "rough mix" that could be developed further.

With the first two songs, I think one of the big problems is that sonically the two guitars are really competing with each other, especially in "Should Have Left Town"... you set up a nice groove in that song, and it sounds like you're more comfortable playing it, but the two guitars are really clashing to my ear. What I would suggest when over-laying guitar parts is to think in four "dimensions"... everyone gets the first two...

-Pan: put one guitar on the left, one on the right... you did this, but maybe not quite enough.

-Volume: one guitar is louder than the other... pick the one you want to stand out, then mix in the other so it doesn't interfere with that guitar part.

-Frequency: this is where you're having the biggest problem. The guitars tonally sound almost identical in "Should Have Left Town" so it really starts to sound mushy. Its good to think in terms of frequency and tone.. so if you're going to have one really clean acoustic sounding part in the mid-range, maybe you want a fairly dirty lead part, or a really low growly power-chord for the other guitar part.

-Depth: where in "space" are the guitars? Use reverb to place one "back" while keeping the other "forward".

These are just a few techniques that can help keep your mix coherent. The last song "Still got this Feeling" is the strongest. Parts of it remind me of Pink Floyd. Your vocals are fairly pitchy, so what I think would really serve that song well would be to do an "acoustic only" version... so just one acoustic guitar, and a single vocal track. Bring the vocals up in the mix and add more reverb to expand the vocal a bit. Just focus on capturing the mood on the song with an acoustic and one vocal track, then go from there. Hope this helps!

#2

Good effort! There's definitely issues, but to me it sounds more like a "rough mix" that could be developed further.

With the first two songs, I think one of the big problems is that sonically the two guitars are really competing with each other, especially in "Should Have Left Town"... you set up a nice groove in that song, and it sounds like you're more comfortable playing it, but the two guitars are really clashing to my ear. What I would suggest when over-laying guitar parts is to think in four "dimensions"... everyone gets the first two...

-Pan: put one guitar on the left, one on the right... you did this, but maybe not quite enough.

-Volume: one guitar is louder than the other... pick the one you want to stand out, then mix in the other so it doesn't interfere with that guitar part.

-Frequency: this is where you're having the biggest problem. The guitars tonally sound almost identical in "Should Have Left Town" so it really starts to sound mushy. Its good to think in terms of frequency and tone.. so if you're going to have one really clean acoustic sounding part in the mid-range, maybe you want a fairly dirty lead part, or a really low growly power-chord for the other guitar part.

-Depth: where in "space" are the guitars? Use reverb to place one "back" while keeping the other "forward".

These are just a few techniques that can help keep your mix coherent. The last song "Still got this Feeling" is the strongest. Parts of it remind me of Pink Floyd. Your vocals are fairly pitchy, so what I think would really serve that song well would be to do an "acoustic only" version... so just one acoustic guitar, and a single vocal track. Bring the vocals up in the mix and add more reverb to expand the vocal a bit. Just focus on capturing the mood on the song with an acoustic and one vocal track, then go from there. Hope this helps!

Razbo

Full Access

Joined: 03/02/09

Posts: 1562

Originally Posted by: Slipin
Good effort! There's definitely issues, but to me it sounds more like a "rough mix" that could be developed further.

It's a learning project on several fronts, so you are right, and thanks! Smilie

Originally Posted by: Slipin

With the first two songs, I think one of the big problems is that sonically the two guitars are really competing with each other

One Regret was pretty raw in both circumstance and intent, but I definitely think it's the worst sounding, too. Your comments got them in chronological order, so you probably already get which was the first song I tried. Smilie

The idea on reverb is cool. More panning. More guitar separation.

Originally Posted by: Slipin

Your vocals are fairly pitchy, so what I think would really serve that song well would be to do an "acoustic only" version...

Ha, screw you. Big Grin jk. I'm actually getting to recognise my pitch spikes on the screen. The chorus on Still Got This Feeling moves me either way. I did it acousticly for years (wrote it in 1987) but only now had the ability to put in what I wanted for a chorus. I'm kinda liking it so far.

Thanks for taking the time to listen and comment! Smilie
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

#3

Originally Posted by: Slipin
Good effort! There's definitely issues, but to me it sounds more like a "rough mix" that could be developed further.

It's a learning project on several fronts, so you are right, and thanks! Smilie

Originally Posted by: Slipin

With the first two songs, I think one of the big problems is that sonically the two guitars are really competing with each other

One Regret was pretty raw in both circumstance and intent, but I definitely think it's the worst sounding, too. Your comments got them in chronological order, so you probably already get which was the first song I tried. Smilie

The idea on reverb is cool. More panning. More guitar separation.

Originally Posted by: Slipin

Your vocals are fairly pitchy, so what I think would really serve that song well would be to do an "acoustic only" version...

Ha, screw you. Big Grin jk. I'm actually getting to recognise my pitch spikes on the screen. The chorus on Still Got This Feeling moves me either way. I did it acousticly for years (wrote it in 1987) but only now had the ability to put in what I wanted for a chorus. I'm kinda liking it so far.

Thanks for taking the time to listen and comment! Smilie
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

Slipin Lizard

Registered User

Joined: 11/15/07

Posts: 711

Originally Posted by: Razbo

Ha, screw you.


Love it!! Actually, that's the right attitude, or at least I think so.. don't worry too much about pitchy vocals... it just gives you style and character... we all know the obvious examples like Bob Dylan or Neil Young, but listen to Bono, especially some of their early stuff (Gloria, etc) or The Red Hot Chillipeppers... I wouldn't worry about it at all... interesting that tune was acoustic originally... it does retain that feel.

#4

Originally Posted by: Razbo

Ha, screw you.


Love it!! Actually, that's the right attitude, or at least I think so.. don't worry too much about pitchy vocals... it just gives you style and character... we all know the obvious examples like Bob Dylan or Neil Young, but listen to Bono, especially some of their early stuff (Gloria, etc) or The Red Hot Chillipeppers... I wouldn't worry about it at all... interesting that tune was acoustic originally... it does retain that feel.

SlickString

Full Access

Joined: 05/31/09

Posts: 156

I like "Still got this Feeling" a lot. Great feeling to it. Nice one.

#5

I like "Still got this Feeling" a lot. Great feeling to it. Nice one.

carminemarotta

Registered User

Joined: 02/27/09

Posts: 493

Razbo
it was really nice to hear your voice and you guitar. Thanks for sharing.

Carmine
Carmine

#6

Razbo
it was really nice to hear your voice and you guitar. Thanks for sharing.

Carmine
Carmine

CSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 4439

Originally Posted by: Razbo
Hey. I have put together a few demos so far that I have uploaded if anyone is interested.

Awesome! It's wonderful that you are creating original stuff & putting it out there, Razbo.

I think the criticisms Slipin Lizard offered were fair & helpful. I'll add a couple of other things that stuck out.

Recording wise, are you using a compressor or pre-amp? That can help make the recorded input signal a little more "present"; 3-D or lively instead of thin & sterile. What kind of mic are you using to record to vox & guitars?

Composition & arrangement wise, you've got some good raw ideas on sections & contrasts (intro, verse, chorus, solo, etc.). But I think they could be tightened up more & made more contrasting. You can do this by a fill, a rhythmic "space", a different guitar sound, a harmony vocal, a ride cymbal instead of the high-hat, etc. Just something to clearly indicate the boundary between each section.

Also, dynamics. You have a little bit of dynamics, gradually building the song up & bringing it back down. But even within sections, you can build the tension more, for example by starting sparcely, then making the bass or guitar more active or louder as the section progresses. Then, building it to a precise peak before breaking clearing into the next section. Just one example of how to do this. What I am talking about is making a "story arc" out of the music that matches the ideas & emotional content of the lyrics. Smilie

And speaking of lyrics, they are sincerely meant in thought & emotional content. But I don't think the melody you use (the notes you sing) to get them across supports them as well as they could. This is not a criticism of your voice per se! But of how you are using your voice. Again, try to create a story arc to each line, verse, chorus, the overall song. Play the melody on the guitar. Think in musical terms as you write & sing the lyric to impart a melodic arc.

I hope these ideas help. I admire you for creating original music & sharing it with us. Kudos. Smilie
Originally Posted by: Razbo

Anyway, hope somebody like's 'em.

I hope you like them. That's what matters. Smilie
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#8

Originally Posted by: Razbo
Hey. I have put together a few demos so far that I have uploaded if anyone is interested.

Awesome! It's wonderful that you are creating original stuff & putting it out there, Razbo.

I think the criticisms Slipin Lizard offered were fair & helpful. I'll add a couple of other things that stuck out.

Recording wise, are you using a compressor or pre-amp? That can help make the recorded input signal a little more "present"; 3-D or lively instead of thin & sterile. What kind of mic are you using to record to vox & guitars?

Composition & arrangement wise, you've got some good raw ideas on sections & contrasts (intro, verse, chorus, solo, etc.). But I think they could be tightened up more & made more contrasting. You can do this by a fill, a rhythmic "space", a different guitar sound, a harmony vocal, a ride cymbal instead of the high-hat, etc. Just something to clearly indicate the boundary between each section.

Also, dynamics. You have a little bit of dynamics, gradually building the song up & bringing it back down. But even within sections, you can build the tension more, for example by starting sparcely, then making the bass or guitar more active or louder as the section progresses. Then, building it to a precise peak before breaking clearing into the next section. Just one example of how to do this. What I am talking about is making a "story arc" out of the music that matches the ideas & emotional content of the lyrics. Smilie

And speaking of lyrics, they are sincerely meant in thought & emotional content. But I don't think the melody you use (the notes you sing) to get them across supports them as well as they could. This is not a criticism of your voice per se! But of how you are using your voice. Again, try to create a story arc to each line, verse, chorus, the overall song. Play the melody on the guitar. Think in musical terms as you write & sing the lyric to impart a melodic arc.

I hope these ideas help. I admire you for creating original music & sharing it with us. Kudos. Smilie
Originally Posted by: Razbo

Anyway, hope somebody like's 'em.

I hope you like them. That's what matters. Smilie
Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

Razbo

Full Access

Joined: 03/02/09

Posts: 1562

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel
Awesome! It's wonderful that you are creating original stuff & putting it out there, Razbo.

Thanks. I am finding the experience to be extremely eye-opening. Playing the intruments is not an ego thing, rather, it's really quite humbling and educational.

I have a whole new respect for the Bass/Drums relationship. Anytime I put down the drums before bass I have to go back and redo it so far. Arrogant bastard that I am, I always thought the bass was playing with ME Big Grin.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

I think the criticisms Slipin Lizard offered were fair & helpful. I'll add a couple of other things that stuck out.

I 100% agree. Any off colour responces are just my sense of humour and not offence taken. I'm already puttuing the suggestions to good use. (I think.)

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Recording wise, are you using a compressor or pre-amp? That can help make the recorded input signal a little more "present"; 3-D or lively instead of thin & sterile. What kind of mic are you using to record to vox & guitars?

This is a critical point. I have very little recordng gear, and you are right. Ther tracks seems somehow 'dead' There is no sparkle. This applies to all of them. I try adding some subtle reverb and playing with the frequencies which helps a bit.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Composition & arrangement wise, you've got some good raw ideas on sections & contrasts (intro, verse, chorus, solo, etc.). But I think they could be tightened up more & made more contrasting.

Tighter for sure. Contrasting with different sound... That would apply to my live play, too. I don't use a lot of effects, maybe I should. I'm big on ride-cymbal choruses, though. Back when I was drumming, Alex V was pretty much my hero. I think you are also referring to "transitions" (from verse to cho, etc) as well. Some parts are deliberately harsh transitions. I want them to knock you in the head. Others could use some little bridges. I find those more difficult to write than the rest of the song, but I am working on some for One Regret, and another tune that is not up yet.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Also, dynamics. You have a little bit of dynamics, gradually building the song up & bringing it back down. But even within sections, you can build the tension more, for example by starting sparcely, then making the bass or guitar more active or louder as the section progresses.

And speaking of lyrics, they are sincerely meant in thought & emotional content. But I don't think the melody you use (the notes you sing) to get them across supports them as well as they could. This is not a criticism of your voice per se! But of how you are using your voice. Again, try to create a story arc to each line, verse, chorus, the overall song. Play the melody on the guitar. Think in musical terms as you write & sing the lyric to impart a melodic arc.

I will focus on these things. I like big dramatic songs and try to really bring that in with the parts. One Regret is such a long song, it would really help to add some texture to that. A rework is underway. And I'm newly concious of trying to emphasioze the the 'important words'. This is new to me (I would normally just go for it) and I'm still feeling that out but I see where that's going to help get my points and emotions across.

Thanks once again to everyone for the input. I put up new songs every few days. I have several going back to the 80's, I'm just trying to get them catalogued for now. Almost everything was originally written on acoustic guitar, so I'll start putting up original versions as well as my electrified versions and maybe update this thread once in a while if I think I put up something of interest.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

#9

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel
Awesome! It's wonderful that you are creating original stuff & putting it out there, Razbo.

Thanks. I am finding the experience to be extremely eye-opening. Playing the intruments is not an ego thing, rather, it's really quite humbling and educational.

I have a whole new respect for the Bass/Drums relationship. Anytime I put down the drums before bass I have to go back and redo it so far. Arrogant bastard that I am, I always thought the bass was playing with ME Big Grin.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

I think the criticisms Slipin Lizard offered were fair & helpful. I'll add a couple of other things that stuck out.

I 100% agree. Any off colour responces are just my sense of humour and not offence taken. I'm already puttuing the suggestions to good use. (I think.)

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Recording wise, are you using a compressor or pre-amp? That can help make the recorded input signal a little more "present"; 3-D or lively instead of thin & sterile. What kind of mic are you using to record to vox & guitars?

This is a critical point. I have very little recordng gear, and you are right. Ther tracks seems somehow 'dead' There is no sparkle. This applies to all of them. I try adding some subtle reverb and playing with the frequencies which helps a bit.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Composition & arrangement wise, you've got some good raw ideas on sections & contrasts (intro, verse, chorus, solo, etc.). But I think they could be tightened up more & made more contrasting.

Tighter for sure. Contrasting with different sound... That would apply to my live play, too. I don't use a lot of effects, maybe I should. I'm big on ride-cymbal choruses, though. Back when I was drumming, Alex V was pretty much my hero. I think you are also referring to "transitions" (from verse to cho, etc) as well. Some parts are deliberately harsh transitions. I want them to knock you in the head. Others could use some little bridges. I find those more difficult to write than the rest of the song, but I am working on some for One Regret, and another tune that is not up yet.

Originally Posted by: CSchlegel

Also, dynamics. You have a little bit of dynamics, gradually building the song up & bringing it back down. But even within sections, you can build the tension more, for example by starting sparcely, then making the bass or guitar more active or louder as the section progresses.

And speaking of lyrics, they are sincerely meant in thought & emotional content. But I don't think the melody you use (the notes you sing) to get them across supports them as well as they could. This is not a criticism of your voice per se! But of how you are using your voice. Again, try to create a story arc to each line, verse, chorus, the overall song. Play the melody on the guitar. Think in musical terms as you write & sing the lyric to impart a melodic arc.

I will focus on these things. I like big dramatic songs and try to really bring that in with the parts. One Regret is such a long song, it would really help to add some texture to that. A rework is underway. And I'm newly concious of trying to emphasioze the the 'important words'. This is new to me (I would normally just go for it) and I'm still feeling that out but I see where that's going to help get my points and emotions across.

Thanks once again to everyone for the input. I put up new songs every few days. I have several going back to the 80's, I'm just trying to get them catalogued for now. Almost everything was originally written on acoustic guitar, so I'll start putting up original versions as well as my electrified versions and maybe update this thread once in a while if I think I put up something of interest.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.