Chords changing issues

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Violanted

Full Access

Joined: 03/21/21

Posts: 48

Hey All

I have completed fundamaentals 1 and started fundamentals 2.

I definately enjoyed so far. Fantastic course ...

Now there is just an issue and I think is part of the process. I am basically practicing all the chords I learnt so far Em E Am A C F (Small F easy version) G and D and Dm and I think that is it so far.

I have difficulties to switch between them using the practical methos I lear on the GTF1 with Anders which is creating a song with intro verse and outro and so on so forth.

If I practice using metronone at 45 bpm it's fine 55 bpm I start to make mistakes and not able to keep on tempo I try to increase the Tempo every time I try.

It is one month I am trying to get fluent on this chord change probably it will take longer time. I am looking for ability to change at 70 bpm and more but to be able to do that I must be so fast that I will have not to think about the chord itself and just change automatically the same way I do with my piano

I play keyboard and organ since 20 years mayb enow and indeed chrords change is not even something I think about it.

I bet this is the same process with guitar so I gues one month is too early to be proficient with chrod changes?

I practice several small sessions throughout the day probably I collect a total amount of 1,5 hours a day except weekend

Stangely enough on GTF2 on the Arpeggio training I am able to switch chords in a much faster way and it seems I can do the arpeggio in a much more clean way than changing chrods as whole. Why is that? arpeggio should be more difficult isn't?

Thanks

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

#1

Hey All

I have completed fundamaentals 1 and started fundamentals 2.

I definately enjoyed so far. Fantastic course ...

Now there is just an issue and I think is part of the process. I am basically practicing all the chords I learnt so far Em E Am A C F (Small F easy version) G and D and Dm and I think that is it so far.

I have difficulties to switch between them using the practical methos I lear on the GTF1 with Anders which is creating a song with intro verse and outro and so on so forth.

If I practice using metronone at 45 bpm it's fine 55 bpm I start to make mistakes and not able to keep on tempo I try to increase the Tempo every time I try.

It is one month I am trying to get fluent on this chord change probably it will take longer time. I am looking for ability to change at 70 bpm and more but to be able to do that I must be so fast that I will have not to think about the chord itself and just change automatically the same way I do with my piano

I play keyboard and organ since 20 years mayb enow and indeed chrords change is not even something I think about it.

I bet this is the same process with guitar so I gues one month is too early to be proficient with chrod changes?

I practice several small sessions throughout the day probably I collect a total amount of 1,5 hours a day except weekend

Stangely enough on GTF2 on the Arpeggio training I am able to switch chords in a much faster way and it seems I can do the arpeggio in a much more clean way than changing chrods as whole. Why is that? arpeggio should be more difficult isn't?

Thanks

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

snojones

Full Access

Joined: 04/17/13

Posts: 620

You are very correct in your thinking about how guitar and piano practice produce simialr results. If you practice long enough, you will succeed.

As to why arpeggios are easier for you I would speculate it is that you have to grab the entire chord all at once. Not one string at a time. This involves training your Muscle Memory to do the heavy lifting. Like piano, that takes time and persistant practice.

I learned how to do this by memorizing the patterns of the chord I wanted to work with. Getting those patterns into my head was the first step. Then I started practicing grabbing the pattern on my fretboard. No strumming yet.... In off hours (like watching tv) I would simply jump around to those chord patterns, without strumming them. Get those patterns drilled into you Muscle Memory, until you can easily and accurately change between them. I used to practice grabbing patterns in slack time by grabbing fingerings using my right forearm as a practice neck and grabing those chord fingering on the forearm with my left hand. I kept changing them until it was drilled into my fingers. Only then did I get serious about taking this skill to apply to real songs. Go slow at first. Gradually increase your speed until you have mastered the song.

As to how long it will take you, you are better at simply accepting that you will get it as soon as your body is able to do so...no sooner. I repeat... NO SOONER. To further complicate thak kind of thinking... everybody learns at their own pace. So it is completly impractical to attempt to project how long it is going to take. The sooner you give that question up... the sooner you will develop skills.

Captcha is a total pain in the........

#2

You are very correct in your thinking about how guitar and piano practice produce simialr results. If you practice long enough, you will succeed.

As to why arpeggios are easier for you I would speculate it is that you have to grab the entire chord all at once. Not one string at a time. This involves training your Muscle Memory to do the heavy lifting. Like piano, that takes time and persistant practice.

I learned how to do this by memorizing the patterns of the chord I wanted to work with. Getting those patterns into my head was the first step. Then I started practicing grabbing the pattern on my fretboard. No strumming yet.... In off hours (like watching tv) I would simply jump around to those chord patterns, without strumming them. Get those patterns drilled into you Muscle Memory, until you can easily and accurately change between them. I used to practice grabbing patterns in slack time by grabbing fingerings using my right forearm as a practice neck and grabing those chord fingering on the forearm with my left hand. I kept changing them until it was drilled into my fingers. Only then did I get serious about taking this skill to apply to real songs. Go slow at first. Gradually increase your speed until you have mastered the song.

As to how long it will take you, you are better at simply accepting that you will get it as soon as your body is able to do so...no sooner. I repeat... NO SOONER. To further complicate thak kind of thinking... everybody learns at their own pace. So it is completly impractical to attempt to project how long it is going to take. The sooner you give that question up... the sooner you will develop skills.

Captcha is a total pain in the........

Violanted

Full Access

Joined: 03/21/21

Posts: 48

Originally Posted by: snojones

You are very correct in your thinking about how guitar and piano practice produce simialr results. If you practice long enough, you will succeed.

As to why arpeggios are easier for you I would speculate it is that you have to grab the entire chord all at once. Not one string at a time. This involves training your Muscle Memory to do the heavy lifting. Like piano, that takes time and persistant practice.

I learned how to do this by memorizing the patterns of the chord I wanted to work with. Getting those patterns into my head was the first step. Then I started practicing grabbing the pattern on my fretboard. No strumming yet.... In off hours (like watching tv) I would simply jump around to those chord patterns, without strumming them. Get those patterns drilled into you Muscle Memory, until you can easily and accurately change between them. I used to practice grabbing patterns in slack time by grabbing fingerings using my right forearm as a practice neck and grabing those chord fingering on the forearm with my left hand. I kept changing them until it was drilled into my fingers. Only then did I get serious about taking this skill to apply to real songs. Go slow at first. Gradually increase your speed until you have mastered the song.

As to how long it will take you, you are better at simply accepting that you will get it as soon as your body is able to do so...no sooner. I repeat... NO SOONER. To further complicate thak kind of thinking... everybody learns at their own pace. So it is completly impractical to attempt to project how long it is going to take. The sooner you give that question up... the sooner you will develop skills.

I fully agree each single word you wrote, and it was the same process with piano/keyboard.

Thanks

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

#3

Originally Posted by: snojones

You are very correct in your thinking about how guitar and piano practice produce simialr results. If you practice long enough, you will succeed.

As to why arpeggios are easier for you I would speculate it is that you have to grab the entire chord all at once. Not one string at a time. This involves training your Muscle Memory to do the heavy lifting. Like piano, that takes time and persistant practice.

I learned how to do this by memorizing the patterns of the chord I wanted to work with. Getting those patterns into my head was the first step. Then I started practicing grabbing the pattern on my fretboard. No strumming yet.... In off hours (like watching tv) I would simply jump around to those chord patterns, without strumming them. Get those patterns drilled into you Muscle Memory, until you can easily and accurately change between them. I used to practice grabbing patterns in slack time by grabbing fingerings using my right forearm as a practice neck and grabing those chord fingering on the forearm with my left hand. I kept changing them until it was drilled into my fingers. Only then did I get serious about taking this skill to apply to real songs. Go slow at first. Gradually increase your speed until you have mastered the song.

As to how long it will take you, you are better at simply accepting that you will get it as soon as your body is able to do so...no sooner. I repeat... NO SOONER. To further complicate thak kind of thinking... everybody learns at their own pace. So it is completly impractical to attempt to project how long it is going to take. The sooner you give that question up... the sooner you will develop skills.

I fully agree each single word you wrote, and it was the same process with piano/keyboard.

Thanks

Dave Mojo

davide.violante@rockers.rocks

www.rockers.rocks

Netheralnds

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7693

Congratulations on completing GF1!

Originally Posted by: Violanted

I have difficulties to switch between them . . .

If I practice using metronone at 45 bpm it's fine 55 bpm I start to make mistakes and not able to keep on tempo I try to increase the Tempo every time I try.

It takes every student a different amount of time & practice to do any given skill.

For some students it helps to solely focus on the specific physical motions of the chord change. Try it for part of your practice routine.

Don't strum chords in time with a song or to a metronome. Just play each chord once. Pick any 2 chords.

Play a C chord once. Focus on getting all the notes to ring clearly & cleanly. Stop.

Switch to a G chord. Again focus on finger placement & clear notes. Play it once. Stop.

Repeat.

Try different chords. Try sets of chords that are found together in a song. But don't try to play them in time. Just focus on the physical motions required to get from one chord to the next, playing each chord just once.

Originally Posted by: Violanted
I am looking for ability to change at 70 bpm and more but to be able to do that I must be so fast that I will have not to think about the chord itself and just change automatically the same way I do with my piano

Yes, it's the same principle. You have to automate the process so the physical motions are completely second nature. So, you only have to think, "C chord" & your brain, hands & hours of repetitious practice take care of the details!

Originally Posted by: Violanted
Stangely enough on GTF2 on the Arpeggio training I am able to switch chords in a much faster way and it seems I can do the arpeggio in a much more clean way than changing chrods as whole. Why is that? arpeggio should be more difficult isn't?[/p]

Most probably, as Snojones correctly noted, you have the leisure of extra time getting each finger into place. Whereas with strumming you need to have every finger in place immediately for the change!

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#4

Congratulations on completing GF1!

Originally Posted by: Violanted

I have difficulties to switch between them . . .

If I practice using metronone at 45 bpm it's fine 55 bpm I start to make mistakes and not able to keep on tempo I try to increase the Tempo every time I try.

It takes every student a different amount of time & practice to do any given skill.

For some students it helps to solely focus on the specific physical motions of the chord change. Try it for part of your practice routine.

Don't strum chords in time with a song or to a metronome. Just play each chord once. Pick any 2 chords.

Play a C chord once. Focus on getting all the notes to ring clearly & cleanly. Stop.

Switch to a G chord. Again focus on finger placement & clear notes. Play it once. Stop.

Repeat.

Try different chords. Try sets of chords that are found together in a song. But don't try to play them in time. Just focus on the physical motions required to get from one chord to the next, playing each chord just once.

Originally Posted by: Violanted
I am looking for ability to change at 70 bpm and more but to be able to do that I must be so fast that I will have not to think about the chord itself and just change automatically the same way I do with my piano

Yes, it's the same principle. You have to automate the process so the physical motions are completely second nature. So, you only have to think, "C chord" & your brain, hands & hours of repetitious practice take care of the details!

Originally Posted by: Violanted
Stangely enough on GTF2 on the Arpeggio training I am able to switch chords in a much faster way and it seems I can do the arpeggio in a much more clean way than changing chrods as whole. Why is that? arpeggio should be more difficult isn't?[/p]

Most probably, as Snojones correctly noted, you have the leisure of extra time getting each finger into place. Whereas with strumming you need to have every finger in place immediately for the change!

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory