Start with simple or full chords

Guitar Tricks Forum > Guitar Basics > Start with simple or full chords

jrspringer.15

Full Access

Joined: 01/26/19

Posts: 8

Hi Everyone,

I tried this guitar adventure about a year ago and eventually gave up because I wasn't progressing fast enough. I just didn't have the right expectations. It looks so easy when someone experienced is playing...lol.

My question: is it better to start with simple chords or the full chords? My concern is to spend time on the simple chords and then eventually switch to the full chords. It would almost be like starting over. I hope that makes sense.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

Jim

#1

Hi Everyone,

I tried this guitar adventure about a year ago and eventually gave up because I wasn't progressing fast enough. I just didn't have the right expectations. It looks so easy when someone experienced is playing...lol.

My question: is it better to start with simple chords or the full chords? My concern is to spend time on the simple chords and then eventually switch to the full chords. It would almost be like starting over. I hope that makes sense.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

Jim

William MG

Full Access

Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 291

Hi Jim

11 months in myself. Here is the bad news: it's not an easy instrument to learn, but we can all learn it and improve with regular practice.

It would be my suggestion to start with Lisa's beginner courses. Don't be in a rush, practice lots and stick with it.

Watch this - beginner frustration

Good luck

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

#2

Hi Jim

11 months in myself. Here is the bad news: it's not an easy instrument to learn, but we can all learn it and improve with regular practice.

It would be my suggestion to start with Lisa's beginner courses. Don't be in a rush, practice lots and stick with it.

Watch this - beginner frustration

Good luck

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

JeffS65

Full Access

Joined: 10/07/08

Posts: 1212

Originally Posted by: jrspringer.15

Hi Everyone,

I tried this guitar adventure about a year ago and eventually gave up because I wasn't progressing fast enough. I just didn't have the right expectations. It looks so easy when someone experienced is playing...lol.

My question: is it better to start with simple chords or the full chords? My concern is to spend time on the simple chords and then eventually switch to the full chords. It would almost be like starting over. I hope that makes sense.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

Jim

If you haven't already learned them, or if you have, the most used chords in music are the standard open G, D, E, A and C. You can play a shocking number of songs with just those chords. With the exception of the C, most are pretty easy to do and get used to (the C can be alittle awkward depending on your hand). These are meat and potatos that you will always use no matter the style of music you play.

Which brings me to the second point; it depends on the type of music you want to play as to what chords you will want to learn as a beginner.

If you are more acoustic, country or folk stuff, the open chords above will serve a lot of stuff you play. A lot. If you're more in to rock or metal, barre chords and power chords (power chords are pretty much barre chords but only use two fingers to fret the 'barre' and you don't strike all the strings, just the two).

True barre chords are a tough road for many beginners to actually play the chord cleanly. It's a good skill and should be learned but you'll also find that in so many rock songs that a true barre chord isn't exactly used all that much.

So really, you probably want to chart a few different paths in practicing chords:

Definately learn open chords. If you're practicing a song, notice the choices where a true barre chord is not needed. BUT, learn them barre chords and practice them at the same time so that when you're skills are building, all the 'chord boats' rise at the same time.

Remember, all you're doing is holding down strings so you don't really need to be overly concerned with a super-defined protocol. Just a guideline for your approach.

Remember, it's supposed to be fun so don't beat yourself down because you aren't perfect. I've been playing since '82ish and even though I can play, I ain't perfect.

#3

Originally Posted by: jrspringer.15

Hi Everyone,

I tried this guitar adventure about a year ago and eventually gave up because I wasn't progressing fast enough. I just didn't have the right expectations. It looks so easy when someone experienced is playing...lol.

My question: is it better to start with simple chords or the full chords? My concern is to spend time on the simple chords and then eventually switch to the full chords. It would almost be like starting over. I hope that makes sense.

Please let me know what you think. Thanks!

Jim

If you haven't already learned them, or if you have, the most used chords in music are the standard open G, D, E, A and C. You can play a shocking number of songs with just those chords. With the exception of the C, most are pretty easy to do and get used to (the C can be alittle awkward depending on your hand). These are meat and potatos that you will always use no matter the style of music you play.

Which brings me to the second point; it depends on the type of music you want to play as to what chords you will want to learn as a beginner.

If you are more acoustic, country or folk stuff, the open chords above will serve a lot of stuff you play. A lot. If you're more in to rock or metal, barre chords and power chords (power chords are pretty much barre chords but only use two fingers to fret the 'barre' and you don't strike all the strings, just the two).

True barre chords are a tough road for many beginners to actually play the chord cleanly. It's a good skill and should be learned but you'll also find that in so many rock songs that a true barre chord isn't exactly used all that much.

So really, you probably want to chart a few different paths in practicing chords:

Definately learn open chords. If you're practicing a song, notice the choices where a true barre chord is not needed. BUT, learn them barre chords and practice them at the same time so that when you're skills are building, all the 'chord boats' rise at the same time.

Remember, all you're doing is holding down strings so you don't really need to be overly concerned with a super-defined protocol. Just a guideline for your approach.

Remember, it's supposed to be fun so don't beat yourself down because you aren't perfect. I've been playing since '82ish and even though I can play, I ain't perfect.

jrspringer.15

Full Access

Joined: 01/26/19

Posts: 8

William MG,

Thanks for the video and the encouragement! I will do my best to not be in a rush.

Jim

#4

William MG,

Thanks for the video and the encouragement! I will do my best to not be in a rush.

Jim

jrspringer.15

Full Access

Joined: 01/26/19

Posts: 8

JeffS65,

Thanks for the advice! I've been focusing on full chords A-D-E because they seem to be easier than C and G. At least for me they seem easier.

#5

JeffS65,

Thanks for the advice! I've been focusing on full chords A-D-E because they seem to be easier than C and G. At least for me they seem easier.