Mike from carshalton, near london

Guitar Tricks Forum > Introduction Forum > Mike from carshalton, near london

michael_streets

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Joined: 09/13/20

Posts: 1

I started playing when I was 16 - my hero was the Edge and naturally I had a digital delay pedal and pretty much everything I played sounded epic. I taught myself but after a few years I got bored of it and never really recovered my mojo. I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it. I am now learning "properly" and it seems I am able to play music, not just strum a bunch of chords. I am approaching 50 but still hope one day to be the next Jeff Beck! Perhaps by the time i reach 100 :)

#1

I started playing when I was 16 - my hero was the Edge and naturally I had a digital delay pedal and pretty much everything I played sounded epic. I taught myself but after a few years I got bored of it and never really recovered my mojo. I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it. I am now learning "properly" and it seems I am able to play music, not just strum a bunch of chords. I am approaching 50 but still hope one day to be the next Jeff Beck! Perhaps by the time i reach 100 :)

Little Owl

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Joined: 08/24/21

Posts: 18

Hello and welcome from accross the pond !

I have more modest ambitions : when the time comes I'll rock the nursing home .

The only real failure is the failure to try.

#2

Hello and welcome from accross the pond !

I have more modest ambitions : when the time comes I'll rock the nursing home .

The only real failure is the failure to try.

sirpath786

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Joined: 08/13/21

Posts: 1

Originally Posted by: michael_streets

I started playing when I was 16 - my hero was the Edge and naturally I had a digital delay pedal and pretty much everything I played sounded epic. I taught myself but after a few years I got bored of it and never really recovered my mojo. I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it. I am now learning "properly" and it seems I am able to play music, not just strum a bunch of chords. I am approaching 50 but still hope one day to be the next Jeff Beck! Perhaps by the time i reach 100 :)

Hi Mike Persoanlly I aspire to Eddie Van Halen...but at my pace and agility of fingers I will probably only get to Slash...LMAO I Wish!

Have fun Brother

Scott

#3

Originally Posted by: michael_streets

I started playing when I was 16 - my hero was the Edge and naturally I had a digital delay pedal and pretty much everything I played sounded epic. I taught myself but after a few years I got bored of it and never really recovered my mojo. I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it. I am now learning "properly" and it seems I am able to play music, not just strum a bunch of chords. I am approaching 50 but still hope one day to be the next Jeff Beck! Perhaps by the time i reach 100 :)

Hi Mike Persoanlly I aspire to Eddie Van Halen...but at my pace and agility of fingers I will probably only get to Slash...LMAO I Wish!

Have fun Brother

Scott

JeffS65

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Joined: 10/07/08

Posts: 1546

Originally Posted by: michael_streets

I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it.

Yep, right there. When players say they've hit a rut, that usually means that they haven't spread their skill set out. Even the Edge plays lots of style. I remember watch the Going to Get Loud thing with Page and Jack White and loved hearing some of the breif riffing the Edge did. Great guitar players have skill beyond their main thing.

Once you start opening up that floodgate of other styles, it gets exciting again.

Honestly, I moved to Georgia a couple of years ago and (even before moving) starting digging bluegrass a bit. Now that I'm down here, I can see bluegrass artists pretty often. Actually, five minutes from my house, is a local secret that has bluegrass every Saturday evening. I can tell you this; I've seen a million really good rock players and a really good rock player is about equal to an average bluegrass player. I long thought that I can play pretty well. Then I watch these guys on Saturdays and, well...........

Anyway, spread your guitar player wings and have fun with it.

#4

Originally Posted by: michael_streets

I now realize that by not learning properly I effectively plateaued and was playing the same old same old until i got sick of it.

Yep, right there. When players say they've hit a rut, that usually means that they haven't spread their skill set out. Even the Edge plays lots of style. I remember watch the Going to Get Loud thing with Page and Jack White and loved hearing some of the breif riffing the Edge did. Great guitar players have skill beyond their main thing.

Once you start opening up that floodgate of other styles, it gets exciting again.

Honestly, I moved to Georgia a couple of years ago and (even before moving) starting digging bluegrass a bit. Now that I'm down here, I can see bluegrass artists pretty often. Actually, five minutes from my house, is a local secret that has bluegrass every Saturday evening. I can tell you this; I've seen a million really good rock players and a really good rock player is about equal to an average bluegrass player. I long thought that I can play pretty well. Then I watch these guys on Saturdays and, well...........

Anyway, spread your guitar player wings and have fun with it.