Hi everyone

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Wrams

Full Access

Joined: 08/04/19

Posts: 5

Hi everyone, great to be here. I'm a total beginner (Never played guitar before) and I'm a young 48 year old man from Bristol, UK.

I have a Yamaha F310 guitar that I'll be learning on. I'm haing finger problems as in strength and coordination so I'm looking to purchase a finger strengthener for starters. Any recommendations as to good adjustable strengheners that your guys have used?

Anyway I'll be asking questions from time to time so hopefully I can achieve my goals of becoming an accomplished guitarist. I only want to learn this for my own self gratification.

Thanks for any help in the future :)

P.S Are these exercisers anygood or similar?Finger Exerciser

#1

Hi everyone, great to be here. I'm a total beginner (Never played guitar before) and I'm a young 48 year old man from Bristol, UK.

I have a Yamaha F310 guitar that I'll be learning on. I'm haing finger problems as in strength and coordination so I'm looking to purchase a finger strengthener for starters. Any recommendations as to good adjustable strengheners that your guys have used?

Anyway I'll be asking questions from time to time so hopefully I can achieve my goals of becoming an accomplished guitarist. I only want to learn this for my own self gratification.

Thanks for any help in the future :)

P.S Are these exercisers anygood or similar?Finger Exerciser

William MG

Full Access

Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 207

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

#2

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

manXcat

"It's getting better all the time"♪♪

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 633

Welcome to the GT forum Wrams!

Originally Posted by: Wrams
P.S Are these exercisers anygood or similar?

Do you know what a placebo is? There's your answer.

Here's some things I've learned which might actually help you to accelerate your progress and achieve your goal.

We live in an era in which almost everyone is looking for a easy (lazy) way to make instant progress. There isn't one, or I've yet to discover it.

It takes time in conjunction with regular application of your fretting hand and fingers with repeated practise to adapt to their new role and unaccustomed exercise. There's no magic formula or "but wait there's more" promise + "a free set of steak knives" gadget that can replace or supplement that. The time spent fiddling with gadgets would be better deployed in practise.

Specific hand and finger stretching routines before and after useful = yes.

Regular focused practice = yes. Gadgets = no.

Here is a stretching exercise tute and a finger tactility warmup tute for beginners. Both useful.

That said, ultimately the most useful tools in your inventory all come free of charge. Persistence, determination, enthusiasm, and when the latter wanes a little at times as it will given our human frailty, discipline.

If you bought your Yamaha F310 new, the strings will be decent quality. .012s, and new. Of the three types of guitar commonly deployed to learn on, acoustic requires the most finger strength and resilience to fret. So if you've had the guitar a while and those strings are old, do yourself a favour and change the strings. Living adjacent the Bristol Channel and in a generally damp enviroment the SW UK is, even if previously unused, the strings will deteriorate once exposed to air, humidity after acidic sweat and oils from hands and fingers have been applied. Tired strings not only sound dreadful, particularly the G, B & E strings, but more importantly, are hard on fingers already tested by the new challenge and will tend to make one fret with excessive pressure in order to achieve tonal clarity.

Also check if the action on your guitar is too high which can making fretting so much more difficult. Every acoustic guitar I have bought new in box has required neck relief adjustment to adjust action varying only in degree, generally lowering (tightening the rod tension) to achieve spec. If you don't know what I'm talking about or are not confident adjusting the truss rod, take your guitar to where you bought it and ask them if they would mind "checking the action" for you. In 2019, IME music shops rely on volume, guitars are way down the list of importance of what they sell, and two out of three shop assistants are disinterested or lazy, too used to selling e-keyboards and other kit in a box like amps, pedals etc which just work OOTB.

Yamaha's F310 (Dreadnought) is a decent training guitar and intermediate instrument. Superb value for money. But, things to be aware of. Its nut is narrowish for an acoustic and its 10mm string spacing is tight, which in conjunction with its neck profile and reduced scale length (634mm) is both easier (less tension) to fret on the one hand, but requires proper form (finger curvature and tip application) on the other to not inadvertantly interfere with adjacent strings for consistent accurate string/note definition. Another thing to pay attention to in learning with any Dreadnought IME is to experiment and ensure proper but comfortable posture when sitting with them, as most of us will when practising. The Dread body is bulbous (deep and wide) which can affect the balance and positioning of strumming arm/hand and fretting hand. Physically important considerations for anyone less than 6' of mesomorphic or endomorphic build IMV&PE.


All the best with your new adventure.

manXcat

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

#3

Welcome to the GT forum Wrams!

Originally Posted by: Wrams
P.S Are these exercisers anygood or similar?

Do you know what a placebo is? There's your answer.

Here's some things I've learned which might actually help you to accelerate your progress and achieve your goal.

We live in an era in which almost everyone is looking for a easy (lazy) way to make instant progress. There isn't one, or I've yet to discover it.

It takes time in conjunction with regular application of your fretting hand and fingers with repeated practise to adapt to their new role and unaccustomed exercise. There's no magic formula or "but wait there's more" promise + "a free set of steak knives" gadget that can replace or supplement that. The time spent fiddling with gadgets would be better deployed in practise.

Specific hand and finger stretching routines before and after useful = yes.

Regular focused practice = yes. Gadgets = no.

Here is a stretching exercise tute and a finger tactility warmup tute for beginners. Both useful.

That said, ultimately the most useful tools in your inventory all come free of charge. Persistence, determination, enthusiasm, and when the latter wanes a little at times as it will given our human frailty, discipline.

If you bought your Yamaha F310 new, the strings will be decent quality. .012s, and new. Of the three types of guitar commonly deployed to learn on, acoustic requires the most finger strength and resilience to fret. So if you've had the guitar a while and those strings are old, do yourself a favour and change the strings. Living adjacent the Bristol Channel and in a generally damp enviroment the SW UK is, even if previously unused, the strings will deteriorate once exposed to air, humidity after acidic sweat and oils from hands and fingers have been applied. Tired strings not only sound dreadful, particularly the G, B & E strings, but more importantly, are hard on fingers already tested by the new challenge and will tend to make one fret with excessive pressure in order to achieve tonal clarity.

Also check if the action on your guitar is too high which can making fretting so much more difficult. Every acoustic guitar I have bought new in box has required neck relief adjustment to adjust action varying only in degree, generally lowering (tightening the rod tension) to achieve spec. If you don't know what I'm talking about or are not confident adjusting the truss rod, take your guitar to where you bought it and ask them if they would mind "checking the action" for you. In 2019, IME music shops rely on volume, guitars are way down the list of importance of what they sell, and two out of three shop assistants are disinterested or lazy, too used to selling e-keyboards and other kit in a box like amps, pedals etc which just work OOTB.

Yamaha's F310 (Dreadnought) is a decent training guitar and intermediate instrument. Superb value for money. But, things to be aware of. Its nut is narrowish for an acoustic and its 10mm string spacing is tight, which in conjunction with its neck profile and reduced scale length (634mm) is both easier (less tension) to fret on the one hand, but requires proper form (finger curvature and tip application) on the other to not inadvertantly interfere with adjacent strings for consistent accurate string/note definition. Another thing to pay attention to in learning with any Dreadnought IME is to experiment and ensure proper but comfortable posture when sitting with them, as most of us will when practising. The Dread body is bulbous (deep and wide) which can affect the balance and positioning of strumming arm/hand and fretting hand. Physically important considerations for anyone less than 6' of mesomorphic or endomorphic build IMV&PE.


All the best with your new adventure.

manXcat

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

Wrams

Full Access

Joined: 08/04/19

Posts: 5

Originally Posted by: William

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

I'm not offfended William.I've decided again such a mechanism. I hope your enjoying learning the guitar and I hope I will be as dedicated as you are.

#4

Originally Posted by: William

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

I'm not offfended William.I've decided again such a mechanism. I hope your enjoying learning the guitar and I hope I will be as dedicated as you are.

Wrams

Full Access

Joined: 08/04/19

Posts: 5

Originally Posted by: manXcat

manXcat

Thank you so much for your welcome and detailed information. I have decided against purchasing that exerciser. I will use the links you have provided and keep praticing. I am struggling with my fret hand so I need to really consentrate and practice, practice, practice.

I have only had the guitar for 4 days and the string are new.

#5

Originally Posted by: manXcat

manXcat

Thank you so much for your welcome and detailed information. I have decided against purchasing that exerciser. I will use the links you have provided and keep praticing. I am struggling with my fret hand so I need to really consentrate and practice, practice, practice.

I have only had the guitar for 4 days and the string are new.

William MG

Full Access

Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 207

Originally Posted by: Wrams
Originally Posted by: William

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

I'm not offfended William.I've decided again such a mechanism. I hope your enjoying learning the guitar and I hope I will be as dedicated as you are.

I am and I hope you will also. I take little graces when they are provided to me and they thrill me to no end. This, for me, is not an easy task. But when it comes together it's wonderful.

Here is a vid for you...

Beginner frustrations

Best of luck.

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

#6

Originally Posted by: Wrams
Originally Posted by: William

Hi and welcome.

Please don't be offended by my directness: regular consistent practice will do more for you than you can appreciate and more than a gadget.

I'm 56, 8 mos into it.

I'm not offfended William.I've decided again such a mechanism. I hope your enjoying learning the guitar and I hope I will be as dedicated as you are.

I am and I hope you will also. I take little graces when they are provided to me and they thrill me to no end. This, for me, is not an easy task. But when it comes together it's wonderful.

Here is a vid for you...

Beginner frustrations

Best of luck.

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

manXcat

"It's getting better all the time"♪♪

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 633

Originally Posted by: Wrams

Thank you so much for your welcome and detailed information.

I have only had the guitar for 4 days and the string are new.

You're most welcome.

Your F310 is a sound instrument for the journey you're about to embark upon.

Whilst it probably already is, do check the action of your guitar is not too high. All you need is a steel rule to measure it, or as previously mentioned, if out of your comfort zone adjusting neck relief if necessary, take it into your local guitar shop and ask politely if they can check the action for you.

Too high an action will make it more difficult to fret potentially exacerbating a common beginner trait of pressing the strings too hard (which can result in the fretted note being sharp), and too low can induce other issues such as buzzing.

Have fun with it, be patient, and we'll see you around.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

#7

Originally Posted by: Wrams

Thank you so much for your welcome and detailed information.

I have only had the guitar for 4 days and the string are new.

You're most welcome.

Your F310 is a sound instrument for the journey you're about to embark upon.

Whilst it probably already is, do check the action of your guitar is not too high. All you need is a steel rule to measure it, or as previously mentioned, if out of your comfort zone adjusting neck relief if necessary, take it into your local guitar shop and ask politely if they can check the action for you.

Too high an action will make it more difficult to fret potentially exacerbating a common beginner trait of pressing the strings too hard (which can result in the fretted note being sharp), and too low can induce other issues such as buzzing.

Have fun with it, be patient, and we'll see you around.

"Life is just a bowl of cherries ...."

triggerasynapse

Full Access

Joined: 12/26/18

Posts: 6

William MG

Thanks for sharing that video! I appreciate you putting your skills out there and talking through your experience and where you are now. I can definitely feel alone in my struggles, but your video truly helps. Thanks again :-)

#8

William MG

Thanks for sharing that video! I appreciate you putting your skills out there and talking through your experience and where you are now. I can definitely feel alone in my struggles, but your video truly helps. Thanks again :-)

William MG

Full Access

Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 207

Don't give up Trigger!

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

#9

Don't give up Trigger!

Repertoire:

(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction (Made Easy)

Link to the lesson here - very good for a beginner

Wild Horses (Made Easy)

Link to lesson here

Highway To Hell

Link to lesson here

Honky Tonk Women (Made Easy)

Lesson here - very easy for beginners

Breaking the Law - fun, fast paced song.

Lesson here

Honky Tonk Women - (Not Made Easy!) I will lick this song someday

Lesson here

Wrams

Full Access

Joined: 08/04/19

Posts: 5

Sorry I haven't responded earlier but being a Lorry (Truck) Driver and sometimes work a 15 hour day and the last few days has been exactly that.

I will watch the Video now William and thank you for sharing it.

Thank you manXcat for your advice, I am off of work in 2 weeks time so will take to my local guitar shop and ask them to check it. In the meantime I shall still practice and just to give my fingers and hands exercise.

#10

Sorry I haven't responded earlier but being a Lorry (Truck) Driver and sometimes work a 15 hour day and the last few days has been exactly that.

I will watch the Video now William and thank you for sharing it.

Thank you manXcat for your advice, I am off of work in 2 weeks time so will take to my local guitar shop and ask them to check it. In the meantime I shall still practice and just to give my fingers and hands exercise.