Question about looping & looper pedals w/acoustic

Guitar Tricks Forum > Gear Discussion > Question about looping & looper pedals w/acoustic

glen.wilder.xz

Registered User

Joined: 10/25/19

Posts: 1

I have been interested in looper pedals and looping ever since first experimenting on a PRS I bought a while ago, but ended up returning because of not bonding with the neck. I have always viewed looping as something you do with electrics, but I think my thinking may be flawed here, so..

My question is this. Can you use the standard, popular looper pedals (Ditto, RC-30, JamMan etc) bestelectricguitars.reviews/best-looper-pedals with an acoustic setup? For instance, my only acoustic-electric is my Gibson which I use with a Loudbox mini. Could I simply buy one of the mentioned loopers, plug it into my setup, and begin laying down loops and playing over them?

Sorry if this seems like an beginners question.. I just don't have much experience with anything at all outside of the realm of strictly acoustic, so .. amps and pedals and electronics and recording software, etc etc etc etc.. they have always been a bit foreign to me.

At any rate, I would like to explore this further and I would appreciate any advice, experiences, tips, and guidance that any of you might be able to provide. Would also like to hear about your setup and what you've found to work the best and most enjoyable. If those pedals do NOT work with an acoustic rig/setup, surely they have ones that do?

Thanks

#1

I have been interested in looper pedals and looping ever since first experimenting on a PRS I bought a while ago, but ended up returning because of not bonding with the neck. I have always viewed looping as something you do with electrics, but I think my thinking may be flawed here, so..

My question is this. Can you use the standard, popular looper pedals (Ditto, RC-30, JamMan etc) bestelectricguitars.reviews/best-looper-pedals with an acoustic setup? For instance, my only acoustic-electric is my Gibson which I use with a Loudbox mini. Could I simply buy one of the mentioned loopers, plug it into my setup, and begin laying down loops and playing over them?

Sorry if this seems like an beginners question.. I just don't have much experience with anything at all outside of the realm of strictly acoustic, so .. amps and pedals and electronics and recording software, etc etc etc etc.. they have always been a bit foreign to me.

At any rate, I would like to explore this further and I would appreciate any advice, experiences, tips, and guidance that any of you might be able to provide. Would also like to hear about your setup and what you've found to work the best and most enjoyable. If those pedals do NOT work with an acoustic rig/setup, surely they have ones that do?

Thanks

fuzzb0x

Full Access

Joined: 04/02/13

Posts: 494

As long as you have an elctro acoustic guitar you can use any of the loopers, I've got the Boss RC3 which is a good entry level looper but they're all good fun to use and excellent for using with your guitar practice.

#2

As long as you have an elctro acoustic guitar you can use any of the loopers, I've got the Boss RC3 which is a good entry level looper but they're all good fun to use and excellent for using with your guitar practice.

manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 1024

Originally Posted by: glen.wilder.xz

Can you use the standard, popular looper pedals (Ditto, RC-30, JamMan etc) with an acoustic setup?

Yes.

Nothing more complex to it than that. Can OD on specs until your eyeballs feel like they're bathing in acid. Only way to really famil with actually using a looper is to buy one and use it hands on.

I have two loopers. A Ditto clone (Kokko SOS) and a Boss RC3 clone (NUX Loop Core). I prefer and use the Loop Core most. Loopers just 'see' the guitar input signal, and amps the looper output signal, so both work equally well with electric or e-acoustic.

Effects pedals of course work fine with loopers, but are dependent upon the input stage design of your amp as to how it handles them.

♪A little better all the time♫

#3

Originally Posted by: glen.wilder.xz

Can you use the standard, popular looper pedals (Ditto, RC-30, JamMan etc) with an acoustic setup?

Yes.

Nothing more complex to it than that. Can OD on specs until your eyeballs feel like they're bathing in acid. Only way to really famil with actually using a looper is to buy one and use it hands on.

I have two loopers. A Ditto clone (Kokko SOS) and a Boss RC3 clone (NUX Loop Core). I prefer and use the Loop Core most. Loopers just 'see' the guitar input signal, and amps the looper output signal, so both work equally well with electric or e-acoustic.

Effects pedals of course work fine with loopers, but are dependent upon the input stage design of your amp as to how it handles them.

♪A little better all the time♫

William MG

Full Access

Joined: 03/08/19

Posts: 918

Hi Glen,

Just to add to what has been said by fuzz and manX.

There are many price points and many features, so it will be worth your while to explore these. Loopers are great for practice, for creating and experimenting. If you want a drum track to set your tempo, some like the RC-3 come with a selection of drum tracks. I think there are 6, but I only use the same beat over and over just to help keep timing. Tempo is adjustable.

I think the steepest learning curve with a looper is getting your own timing down so you activate it at just the right time. This took me some getting used to and I am still not happy with all my stop/starts. So don't get discouraged if you do buy something and find it's a bit tricky to get going with it.

"If it sounds cool, it is cool!"

Mike O

Works for me!

#4

Hi Glen,

Just to add to what has been said by fuzz and manX.

There are many price points and many features, so it will be worth your while to explore these. Loopers are great for practice, for creating and experimenting. If you want a drum track to set your tempo, some like the RC-3 come with a selection of drum tracks. I think there are 6, but I only use the same beat over and over just to help keep timing. Tempo is adjustable.

I think the steepest learning curve with a looper is getting your own timing down so you activate it at just the right time. This took me some getting used to and I am still not happy with all my stop/starts. So don't get discouraged if you do buy something and find it's a bit tricky to get going with it.

"If it sounds cool, it is cool!"

Mike O

Works for me!