High gloss tru-oil finish

Guitar Tricks Forum > Ask a Guitar Tech > High gloss tru-oil finish

bookas58

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Joined: 10/27/12

Posts: 73

Hope this is the right place for this.

For all you guys that are building your own guitars and don't want to go to the expense of buying a spray outfit to paint your new creation only to have it collect dust afterwards .

My first project using Birchwood Casey Tru-oil came out ok , but not as glossy as I would have liked . So while the next guitar was under construction , I did a bit of research and a lot of thinking about how to get a real gloss ,

The body was sanded to p600 grit after grain filling and the then stained with water based dye and left for a day to to dry . Next up , tru - oil straight from the bottle wipe on with kitchen paper towel , allowed to dry for a day and then lightly rubbed down with 0000 synthetic steel wool pad . I repeated the process for two more days .

The next step was thin the oil down to 60 Tru-oil / 40 mineral spirits and apply in thin coats , reapplying as soon as it was not sticky when you touched it . I live in a sub- tropical climate and at the moment it is pretty warm and the humidity is not too high , so I was putting on 5 coats a day . I am retired so time is not a critical factor . After each day I allowed it to dry over night and at the start of each day rubbed it back lightly with the steel wool pads before applying more coats . I ended up with about 40 thin coats on it .

Left it 3 weeks to cure , if you can still smell the oil when you put your nose to it it isn't cured . Then light level sanding with p3000 grit and mineral oil . After that back to the synthetic steel wool for a light buff , followed by Tripoli powder and mineral oil on a felt pad . Tripoli powder is an ultra fine abrasive , not sure what the equivalent Rottenstone is .By this time it was pretty glossy . After I gave it a coat of Renaissance wax , you could see your face in it .

On the last build , I used Liberon Black Bison wax which is supposed to be the best , Renaissance makes it look like cheap crap . Renaissance is what they use in museums for conservation , a little goes a long way .

I am not real sure what the grits I used equate to for you guys in the States , but there should be info out there on the net . The synthetic steel wool pads were 0000 Norton Bear Tex , I think ScotchBrite White is the same , but don't quote me .

Hope this helps anybody building their own guitars

Forgot to add , I used a micro- gloss scratch remover before applying the wax

#1

Hope this is the right place for this.

For all you guys that are building your own guitars and don't want to go to the expense of buying a spray outfit to paint your new creation only to have it collect dust afterwards .

My first project using Birchwood Casey Tru-oil came out ok , but not as glossy as I would have liked . So while the next guitar was under construction , I did a bit of research and a lot of thinking about how to get a real gloss ,

The body was sanded to p600 grit after grain filling and the then stained with water based dye and left for a day to to dry . Next up , tru - oil straight from the bottle wipe on with kitchen paper towel , allowed to dry for a day and then lightly rubbed down with 0000 synthetic steel wool pad . I repeated the process for two more days .

The next step was thin the oil down to 60 Tru-oil / 40 mineral spirits and apply in thin coats , reapplying as soon as it was not sticky when you touched it . I live in a sub- tropical climate and at the moment it is pretty warm and the humidity is not too high , so I was putting on 5 coats a day . I am retired so time is not a critical factor . After each day I allowed it to dry over night and at the start of each day rubbed it back lightly with the steel wool pads before applying more coats . I ended up with about 40 thin coats on it .

Left it 3 weeks to cure , if you can still smell the oil when you put your nose to it it isn't cured . Then light level sanding with p3000 grit and mineral oil . After that back to the synthetic steel wool for a light buff , followed by Tripoli powder and mineral oil on a felt pad . Tripoli powder is an ultra fine abrasive , not sure what the equivalent Rottenstone is .By this time it was pretty glossy . After I gave it a coat of Renaissance wax , you could see your face in it .

On the last build , I used Liberon Black Bison wax which is supposed to be the best , Renaissance makes it look like cheap crap . Renaissance is what they use in museums for conservation , a little goes a long way .

I am not real sure what the grits I used equate to for you guys in the States , but there should be info out there on the net . The synthetic steel wool pads were 0000 Norton Bear Tex , I think ScotchBrite White is the same , but don't quote me .

Hope this helps anybody building their own guitars

Forgot to add , I used a micro- gloss scratch remover before applying the wax

Guitar Tricks Admin

Administrator

Joined: 09/28/05

Posts: 2064

Hi bookas58,

Since this is more of a technical question that has to do with guitar building, and trouble-shooting, I've moved the message to "Ask a Guitar Tech."

Hopefully Stephen will be able to answer this for you!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

#2

Hi bookas58,

Since this is more of a technical question that has to do with guitar building, and trouble-shooting, I've moved the message to "Ask a Guitar Tech."

Hopefully Stephen will be able to answer this for you!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

Guitar Tech

Moderator

Joined: 02/20/08

Posts: 925

Thanks for Sharing

Thank you for sharing this very informative posting! Our community benefits greatly, when we all share the most useful knowledge that we've individually accumulated.

Stephen White

#3

Thanks for Sharing

Thank you for sharing this very informative posting! Our community benefits greatly, when we all share the most useful knowledge that we've individually accumulated.

Stephen White