Grid pattern for scales

Guitar Tricks Forum > Music Theory > Grid pattern for scales

SusanMW

Registered User

Joined: 07/05/20

Posts: 219

I'm having trouble grasping the grid pattern for scales. I am in Fundamentals 2 working on the major scales lessons. Could someone explain this concept a little more in depth? I know what the grid looks like....so, you use this pattern for any note anywhere on the neck and that is the scale? I feel like I just need some more context to grasp this. And then to play the linear kind of scale....I'm just a little confused with that, too. So either one is playable?

Also, how proficient in scales should I be to move on? Is this something I will just constantly be working at and working into my practice? I have gone through and studied quite deeply the Music Theory Basics course by Christopher. (Awesome lessons, by the way...)

Thanks in advance for any help. I'm determined to get this....

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

#1

I'm having trouble grasping the grid pattern for scales. I am in Fundamentals 2 working on the major scales lessons. Could someone explain this concept a little more in depth? I know what the grid looks like....so, you use this pattern for any note anywhere on the neck and that is the scale? I feel like I just need some more context to grasp this. And then to play the linear kind of scale....I'm just a little confused with that, too. So either one is playable?

Also, how proficient in scales should I be to move on? Is this something I will just constantly be working at and working into my practice? I have gone through and studied quite deeply the Music Theory Basics course by Christopher. (Awesome lessons, by the way...)

Thanks in advance for any help. I'm determined to get this....

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

ddiddler

Full Access

Joined: 05/13/20

Posts: 287

Christopher Schlegel has just put some new series of lessons up for Minor scale and major scale shapes. so if you click on Christopher on the Instructors tab they may come up. Otherwise try a search. Major scale series 1.

Also look in the toolbox at the scale finder.

I printed a couple of the box shapes off for a couple of Major, Minor and Pentatonic

You may be able to compare to see how the boxes have moved for each scale. The main point being you move the root note in the box on to root position of the scale your trying to use or go to.

I'm no more experienced than yourself to be able to give advice. Sometimes being able to do comes well before being able to understand.

Dave

#2

Christopher Schlegel has just put some new series of lessons up for Minor scale and major scale shapes. so if you click on Christopher on the Instructors tab they may come up. Otherwise try a search. Major scale series 1.

Also look in the toolbox at the scale finder.

I printed a couple of the box shapes off for a couple of Major, Minor and Pentatonic

You may be able to compare to see how the boxes have moved for each scale. The main point being you move the root note in the box on to root position of the scale your trying to use or go to.

I'm no more experienced than yourself to be able to give advice. Sometimes being able to do comes well before being able to understand.

Dave

calvincastillo19845

Registered User

Joined: 12/16/20

Posts: 1

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half. where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red angled line in the figure).

#3

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half. where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red angled line in the figure).

SusanMW

Registered User

Joined: 07/05/20

Posts: 219

Thank you, I will check out those new lessons.

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

#4

Thank you, I will check out those new lessons.

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

ddiddler

Full Access

Joined: 05/13/20

Posts: 287

Christophers first ''box'' is moveable

6th string frets 5.7.9

5th string frets 5.7.9

4 th string frets 6,7

so for an experiment start on any of the notes on the 6 th .

then do the count 5,7,9 5,7,9 and 6.7 and recognise how the scale sounds out.

This works on any of the strings until the B string gets involved then you may have to move up the string by a half or whole step but you will hear it.

What he is doing is moving up a string to find the next notes rather than linear

any note, up 1 string and down 5 frets get you the same note ,then you have to know if your wanting to move a half step or a full step back up the neck

Dave

#5

Christophers first ''box'' is moveable

6th string frets 5.7.9

5th string frets 5.7.9

4 th string frets 6,7

so for an experiment start on any of the notes on the 6 th .

then do the count 5,7,9 5,7,9 and 6.7 and recognise how the scale sounds out.

This works on any of the strings until the B string gets involved then you may have to move up the string by a half or whole step but you will hear it.

What he is doing is moving up a string to find the next notes rather than linear

any note, up 1 string and down 5 frets get you the same note ,then you have to know if your wanting to move a half step or a full step back up the neck

Dave

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7684

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I'm having trouble grasping the grid pattern for scales.

Scales can be confusing for guitar students because:

1. You can play the same note in more than one place on the guitar.

2. Some patterns aren't always possible near the nut when your pattern runs up against the open strings.

3. Some patterns change when they cross from the G string to the B string, because all the strings are tuned 5 frets apart except for those 2 strings which are 4 fret apart.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I am in Fundamentals 2 working on the major scales lessons. Could someone explain this concept a little more in depth?

It might be helpful to watch this short 3 lesson tutorial that covers the conceptual basics of the major scale on the guitar.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=363

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I know what the grid looks like....so, you use this pattern for any note anywhere on the neck and that is the scale?

Essentially, yes. But there are exceptions. And it's not necessary to play & know all of this RIGHT NOW! Just take it one step, lesson & scale pattern at a time. :)


Originally Posted by: SusanMW
And then to play the linear kind of scale....I'm just a little confused with that, too. So either one is playable?

Yes, but it depends on the musical context. You use whichever pattern is the most practical to get the job done. And you don't have to worry about or play all those patterns until you need them.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
Also, how proficient in scales should I be to move on?

At the beginner stage a student is just starting to learn:

1. The physical motions required to play single string melodies.

2. The sound & intervals of the scales as the building blocks of music; essentially aural or ear training.

So just start with one pattern in the easiest possible pattern & practice it. Keep playing it until you have it memorized. The purpose of this is to achieve the 2 steps above:

1. Build physical skill.

2. Apply those scale patterns to music & understand how scales are used to play melodies & connect chords.

For example, Lisa shows a bunch of open scale patterns in GF 2. If you are able to do those, then you are doing fine. Just practice them as you keep working through the course. Eventually that will give you the finger strength & dexterity to learn more scale patterns when you need them.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
Is this something I will just constantly be working at and working into my practice?

In general, yes. But it really depends on your goals for your playing. Some people will never need scales beyond being able to play small melodic runs in between chords, or short melodies to embellish their chordal strumming.

Some people want to know a little more, like how to play simple lead guitar melodies or solos. So, they will need to now a little more about how to apply scale patterns in more areas of the fretboard.

Some people want to play lead guitar all over the fretboard! So they spend a lot of time learning, drilling, practicing, playing many types of scale patterns all over the fretboard.

For now, just follow the course. Get used to how the major & minor scales sound. Get practice at playing single note lines by playing the melodies & scales in GF2.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I have gone through and studied quite deeply the Music Theory Basics course by Christopher. (Awesome lessons, by the way...)

Glad you enjoyed them!

Dave (ddiddler) mentioned some of my recent lessons on scales. Those are good, but a little more advanced. They are designed to be used after GF2. They show how to apply the major scale in multiple ways.

Major Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=453

Minor Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=887

There is a part 2 for each of the above on the way that expands on these concepts to show how to apply them across the whole guitar with lots of practical applications & play alongs. Stay tuned!

So, thanks for the mention, Dave. But those might be a little beyond the scope of this particular situation.

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#6

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I'm having trouble grasping the grid pattern for scales.

Scales can be confusing for guitar students because:

1. You can play the same note in more than one place on the guitar.

2. Some patterns aren't always possible near the nut when your pattern runs up against the open strings.

3. Some patterns change when they cross from the G string to the B string, because all the strings are tuned 5 frets apart except for those 2 strings which are 4 fret apart.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I am in Fundamentals 2 working on the major scales lessons. Could someone explain this concept a little more in depth?

It might be helpful to watch this short 3 lesson tutorial that covers the conceptual basics of the major scale on the guitar.

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=363

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I know what the grid looks like....so, you use this pattern for any note anywhere on the neck and that is the scale?

Essentially, yes. But there are exceptions. And it's not necessary to play & know all of this RIGHT NOW! Just take it one step, lesson & scale pattern at a time. :)


Originally Posted by: SusanMW
And then to play the linear kind of scale....I'm just a little confused with that, too. So either one is playable?

Yes, but it depends on the musical context. You use whichever pattern is the most practical to get the job done. And you don't have to worry about or play all those patterns until you need them.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
Also, how proficient in scales should I be to move on?

At the beginner stage a student is just starting to learn:

1. The physical motions required to play single string melodies.

2. The sound & intervals of the scales as the building blocks of music; essentially aural or ear training.

So just start with one pattern in the easiest possible pattern & practice it. Keep playing it until you have it memorized. The purpose of this is to achieve the 2 steps above:

1. Build physical skill.

2. Apply those scale patterns to music & understand how scales are used to play melodies & connect chords.

For example, Lisa shows a bunch of open scale patterns in GF 2. If you are able to do those, then you are doing fine. Just practice them as you keep working through the course. Eventually that will give you the finger strength & dexterity to learn more scale patterns when you need them.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
Is this something I will just constantly be working at and working into my practice?

In general, yes. But it really depends on your goals for your playing. Some people will never need scales beyond being able to play small melodic runs in between chords, or short melodies to embellish their chordal strumming.

Some people want to know a little more, like how to play simple lead guitar melodies or solos. So, they will need to now a little more about how to apply scale patterns in more areas of the fretboard.

Some people want to play lead guitar all over the fretboard! So they spend a lot of time learning, drilling, practicing, playing many types of scale patterns all over the fretboard.

For now, just follow the course. Get used to how the major & minor scales sound. Get practice at playing single note lines by playing the melodies & scales in GF2.

Originally Posted by: SusanMW
I have gone through and studied quite deeply the Music Theory Basics course by Christopher. (Awesome lessons, by the way...)

Glad you enjoyed them!

Dave (ddiddler) mentioned some of my recent lessons on scales. Those are good, but a little more advanced. They are designed to be used after GF2. They show how to apply the major scale in multiple ways.

Major Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=453

Minor Scale Patterns 1

https://www.guitartricks.com/tutorial.php?input=887

There is a part 2 for each of the above on the way that expands on these concepts to show how to apply them across the whole guitar with lots of practical applications & play alongs. Stay tuned!

So, thanks for the mention, Dave. But those might be a little beyond the scope of this particular situation.

Hope that helps!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

SusanMW

Registered User

Joined: 07/05/20

Posts: 219

Thank you so much Christopher! That really helps a lot. Can't wait to work on it today.

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

#7

Thank you so much Christopher! That really helps a lot. Can't wait to work on it today.

“Often, what seems like an impossible climb is just a staircase without the steps drawn in.” Robert Brault, American Operatic Tenor

ddiddler

Full Access

Joined: 05/13/20

Posts: 287

difficulty level noted Christopher.

I have done the Major Series 1 and it didn't fry my brain

I had started looking around the fretboard and trying to move the scales myself.

Also picked up bits and pieces from Mike Olekshy Friday classes.

I'm kind of stuck around GF2 until my speed levels increase but also seeing what more I can add where I can.

Moving up one string and down 5 frets was something I was looking for after knowing about the Magic L but had never heard it until I did your series.

Having taken notes through GF1 & 2 the scale notations are dotted around various pages in my notebook. It was good to see all the Major scales presented on one worksheet as well as your various work throughs.

I am slowly building up a ring binder with a view to having a more organised practice routine.

So thanks Christopher I enjoyed the Major Series 1 lessons.

Dave

#8

difficulty level noted Christopher.

I have done the Major Series 1 and it didn't fry my brain

I had started looking around the fretboard and trying to move the scales myself.

Also picked up bits and pieces from Mike Olekshy Friday classes.

I'm kind of stuck around GF2 until my speed levels increase but also seeing what more I can add where I can.

Moving up one string and down 5 frets was something I was looking for after knowing about the Magic L but had never heard it until I did your series.

Having taken notes through GF1 & 2 the scale notations are dotted around various pages in my notebook. It was good to see all the Major scales presented on one worksheet as well as your various work throughs.

I am slowly building up a ring binder with a view to having a more organised practice routine.

So thanks Christopher I enjoyed the Major Series 1 lessons.

Dave

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7684

Originally Posted by: SusanMW

Thank you so much Christopher! That really helps a lot. Can't wait to work on it today.

You're welcome. Please ask more questions if necessary!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#9

Originally Posted by: SusanMW

Thank you so much Christopher! That really helps a lot. Can't wait to work on it today.

You're welcome. Please ask more questions if necessary!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

ChristopherSchlegel

Guitar Tricks Instructor

Joined: 08/09/05

Posts: 7684

Originally Posted by: ddiddler

I have done the Major Series 1 and it didn't fry my brain

Thank goodness for that! We shall call it a victory. :)

Originally Posted by: ddiddler
I'm kind of stuck around GF2 until my speed levels increase but also seeing what more I can add where I can.

This is an important observation. Sometimes I've seen students get too worried about learning more scales & patterns when they can't even play the basics ones as music yet. Conceptual knowledge & physical technique are 2 separate things that don't always grow at the same pace. It's important to keep them as close together as possible for optimal learning & playing.

Originally Posted by: ddiddler
Moving up one string and down 5 frets was something I was looking for after knowing about the Magic L but had never heard it until I did your series.

Right, it's sort of implied in everything you learn on guitar. But it's an important thing to explicitly say, know & be able to use.

Originally Posted by: ddiddler

So thanks Christopher I enjoyed the Major Series 1 lessons.

Thanks, glad you enjoyed them!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory

#10

Originally Posted by: ddiddler

I have done the Major Series 1 and it didn't fry my brain

Thank goodness for that! We shall call it a victory. :)

Originally Posted by: ddiddler
I'm kind of stuck around GF2 until my speed levels increase but also seeing what more I can add where I can.

This is an important observation. Sometimes I've seen students get too worried about learning more scales & patterns when they can't even play the basics ones as music yet. Conceptual knowledge & physical technique are 2 separate things that don't always grow at the same pace. It's important to keep them as close together as possible for optimal learning & playing.

Originally Posted by: ddiddler
Moving up one string and down 5 frets was something I was looking for after knowing about the Magic L but had never heard it until I did your series.

Right, it's sort of implied in everything you learn on guitar. But it's an important thing to explicitly say, know & be able to use.

Originally Posted by: ddiddler

So thanks Christopher I enjoyed the Major Series 1 lessons.

Thanks, glad you enjoyed them!

Christopher Schlegel
Guitar Tricks Instructor

Christopher Schlegel Lesson Directory