Flat or sharp

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chrispike306

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Joined: 07/23/17

Posts: 15

Really random one from my brain.

Doing minor scales using the pattern in "Lets streamline the major scales"

I thought to myself "This is a good time to do fretboard note stuff too."

I started naming them to myself, G, A AsharpC D Dsharp F G

I then looked at wikipedia to check I had remembered correctly, but instead of Asharp, it was Bflat.

Any particular reason for that?

#1

Really random one from my brain.

Doing minor scales using the pattern in "Lets streamline the major scales"

I thought to myself "This is a good time to do fretboard note stuff too."

I started naming them to myself, G, A AsharpC D Dsharp F G

I then looked at wikipedia to check I had remembered correctly, but instead of Asharp, it was Bflat.

Any particular reason for that?

jarkko.eklund

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Joined: 09/25/13

Posts: 135

Those flat/sharp notes between a whole step are enharmonic notes. A name of a note comes from a key signature, if it has sharps or flats.

Example:

E major (or C# minor) has four sharps in it (F#, C#, G#, D#), thus the scale is

E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E

Ab major (or F minor) has four flats in it (Bb, Eb, Ab, Db), the scale is

Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F, G, Ab

In these two scales we have three pairs of notes, which are the same pitches, but the context is different: G#/Ab, C#/Db, D#/Eb

#2

Those flat/sharp notes between a whole step are enharmonic notes. A name of a note comes from a key signature, if it has sharps or flats.

Example:

E major (or C# minor) has four sharps in it (F#, C#, G#, D#), thus the scale is

E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#, E

Ab major (or F minor) has four flats in it (Bb, Eb, Ab, Db), the scale is

Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F, G, Ab

In these two scales we have three pairs of notes, which are the same pitches, but the context is different: G#/Ab, C#/Db, D#/Eb

derek.hanley

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Joined: 11/12/14

Posts: 1

Yep, should just point out that it is equally valid to use both enharmonic equivalents (ie A# or Bb) when there is no scale context to define the note names. So if you’re just naming the notes on the fretboard, you can use either name. The scale context is a convention in music which says that you can’t use the two of the same note names when spelling out a scale.

For example, the G major scale has one sharp – F#, and the enharmonic equivalent is Gb. If we were to use Gb when defining the scale, we would get:

G A B C D E Gb

This definition includes the G note twice, and so is technically incorrect when spelling the scale. The correct spelling is:

G A B C D E F#

So it is really just a naming convention which prevents any confusion when spelling out scales and which allows us to define the key of the piece (as defined by the number of sharps and flats in the scale) when writing notation.

If you’re more interested in this side of music theory, look for a circle of fifths or chord wheel, which maps out the notes in a scale and their enharmonic equivalents.

Guitar Tutor at Guitar Lessons Glasgow

#3

Yep, should just point out that it is equally valid to use both enharmonic equivalents (ie A# or Bb) when there is no scale context to define the note names. So if you’re just naming the notes on the fretboard, you can use either name. The scale context is a convention in music which says that you can’t use the two of the same note names when spelling out a scale.

For example, the G major scale has one sharp – F#, and the enharmonic equivalent is Gb. If we were to use Gb when defining the scale, we would get:

G A B C D E Gb

This definition includes the G note twice, and so is technically incorrect when spelling the scale. The correct spelling is:

G A B C D E F#

So it is really just a naming convention which prevents any confusion when spelling out scales and which allows us to define the key of the piece (as defined by the number of sharps and flats in the scale) when writing notation.

If you’re more interested in this side of music theory, look for a circle of fifths or chord wheel, which maps out the notes in a scale and their enharmonic equivalents.

Guitar Tutor at Guitar Lessons Glasgow