Remove bluetooth noise in electric guitar

Guitar Tricks Forum > Tech Talk > Remove bluetooth noise in electric guitar

liuyalan1204

Registered User

Joined: 11/05/17

Posts: 1

I am trying to remove noise from an electric-guitar circuit that I have created called the ArduGuitar. My circuit comprises 2 opto-isolated parts: the audio circuit between the guitar pickups and the output jack, and the control circuit consisting of a Soberton Micro EM-6027: http://www.kynix.com/Parts/3590/EM-6027.html and a Roving Networks RN42 bluetooth module powered by a 9V battery.

A full description is available on the ArduGuitar webpage but in brief, I wrote an Android App that sends controls over bluetooth to the Arduino via the RN42 bluetooth module. The Arduino interprets the commands and adjusts PWM signals on its output pins to control Vactrol (LED-LDR) LEDs which change the resistances attached to the pickup outputs. Thus, I simulate potentiometers and switches, just as per an "normal" electric guitar circuit, while keeping the analog audio fully opto-isolated from the digital control circuit.

Globally, this works very well and I am happy with the result which I would say scores 90% of perfect.

However, despite the use of all shielded cables and a fully shielded RN42 bluetooth module, significant noise still gets into the audio and comes out the amp. This noise is of 2 kinds:

whistling: this is present as soon as the bluetooth is switched on. I have done extensive testing of the use of capacitors across VCC/GND to try to filter this but it all fails. This noise is not very strong, but significant;
clicking: at each data transmission, a click comes out over the audio. It is not very loud, but significant nevertheless.
I use all shielded cables and wiring internally on the audio circuit.

The noise level changes depending on where I position the Bluetooth module, and strangely, the best result seems to be when the module is inside the guitar electronics bay (which is unshielded). The worst result is when the bluetooth module is close to the guitar output cable that connects to the amp.

I have been working on the problem for several months and am now at a loss as to how to proceed...

I wonder how this problem is handled in wireless guitar systems?

Would anyone have any ideas as to how to reduce or eliminate this noise?

#1

I am trying to remove noise from an electric-guitar circuit that I have created called the ArduGuitar. My circuit comprises 2 opto-isolated parts: the audio circuit between the guitar pickups and the output jack, and the control circuit consisting of a Soberton Micro EM-6027: http://www.kynix.com/Parts/3590/EM-6027.html and a Roving Networks RN42 bluetooth module powered by a 9V battery.

A full description is available on the ArduGuitar webpage but in brief, I wrote an Android App that sends controls over bluetooth to the Arduino via the RN42 bluetooth module. The Arduino interprets the commands and adjusts PWM signals on its output pins to control Vactrol (LED-LDR) LEDs which change the resistances attached to the pickup outputs. Thus, I simulate potentiometers and switches, just as per an "normal" electric guitar circuit, while keeping the analog audio fully opto-isolated from the digital control circuit.

Globally, this works very well and I am happy with the result which I would say scores 90% of perfect.

However, despite the use of all shielded cables and a fully shielded RN42 bluetooth module, significant noise still gets into the audio and comes out the amp. This noise is of 2 kinds:

whistling: this is present as soon as the bluetooth is switched on. I have done extensive testing of the use of capacitors across VCC/GND to try to filter this but it all fails. This noise is not very strong, but significant;
clicking: at each data transmission, a click comes out over the audio. It is not very loud, but significant nevertheless.
I use all shielded cables and wiring internally on the audio circuit.

The noise level changes depending on where I position the Bluetooth module, and strangely, the best result seems to be when the module is inside the guitar electronics bay (which is unshielded). The worst result is when the bluetooth module is close to the guitar output cable that connects to the amp.

I have been working on the problem for several months and am now at a loss as to how to proceed...

I wonder how this problem is handled in wireless guitar systems?

Would anyone have any ideas as to how to reduce or eliminate this noise?