Sound proofing

Guitar Tricks Forum > Gear Reviews > Sound proofing

bikerbill77

Registered User

Joined: 08/08/11

Posts: 2

I'm looking to sound proof a room in my house. What are some good options.
(note) I don't want to glue a bunch of stuff to they walls as it's a new house and may end up moving the stuff to a larger room later.

#1

I'm looking to sound proof a room in my house. What are some good options.
(note) I don't want to glue a bunch of stuff to they walls as it's a new house and may end up moving the stuff to a larger room later.

Razbo

Full Access

Joined: 03/02/09

Posts: 1562

I've looked into this a bit as I progressively convert my workshop to a studio. Sound "proofing" will be quite expensive, so you should pick your room now. You can get started with a second layer of drywall with offset joints. Fill in the windows (or buy expensive sound proof ones. ...doors, too), locate and treat every crack, crevace and join... Expensive.

Try this: Put a stereo in a room with a door. Turn it on, and close the door. Now crack the door open. Your decible leak just tripled! This is the kind of thing you are up against. Any untreated location (crack, uninsulated joist, etc) will let sound out.

You can get some good results with sound "reduction". Since you need to take your sound'proofing' back down with minimal damage to the structure, you could use 4 x 8 sheets of Sonopan and a half dozen screws to hold it in place. Or cartons of ceiling tile would also work.

It's not sound proof, but I know via SPL decible readings that I can reduce sound leaks by 20% here, 30% there, just with a little attention to the "weakspots". It is an accumulative result. Everything you do helps.

I only know what I have read and happened to have tried myself, so I will also be interested if anyone has any good ideas. Especially for doors, windows, and vents.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

#2

I've looked into this a bit as I progressively convert my workshop to a studio. Sound "proofing" will be quite expensive, so you should pick your room now. You can get started with a second layer of drywall with offset joints. Fill in the windows (or buy expensive sound proof ones. ...doors, too), locate and treat every crack, crevace and join... Expensive.

Try this: Put a stereo in a room with a door. Turn it on, and close the door. Now crack the door open. Your decible leak just tripled! This is the kind of thing you are up against. Any untreated location (crack, uninsulated joist, etc) will let sound out.

You can get some good results with sound "reduction". Since you need to take your sound'proofing' back down with minimal damage to the structure, you could use 4 x 8 sheets of Sonopan and a half dozen screws to hold it in place. Or cartons of ceiling tile would also work.

It's not sound proof, but I know via SPL decible readings that I can reduce sound leaks by 20% here, 30% there, just with a little attention to the "weakspots". It is an accumulative result. Everything you do helps.

I only know what I have read and happened to have tried myself, so I will also be interested if anyone has any good ideas. Especially for doors, windows, and vents.
...so ever since then, I always hang on to the buckle.

hrandersoniii

Registered User

Joined: 01/31/11

Posts: 160

Had and old room

Had an old room at the building where I had my Screen Printing company. It was soundproofed by the folks that had the building before me. They operated a radio station there and that is where they did advertisements and stuff.
What they did was they had put up studs on the walls, filled the gaps between the studs with "egg carrier" foam. The foam can be bought from Dollar General and it is called a "Bed Mattress Top". Then there was 1/2 inch plywood walls connected to the studs. The walls had carpet tacked to the plywood.
We had a hell of a time tearing that stuff out.. is why I know what they did to it... But, you couldn't hear ANYTHING outside of that room.. not even the circular saws that were going to gut the room.

#3

Had and old room

Had an old room at the building where I had my Screen Printing company. It was soundproofed by the folks that had the building before me. They operated a radio station there and that is where they did advertisements and stuff.
What they did was they had put up studs on the walls, filled the gaps between the studs with "egg carrier" foam. The foam can be bought from Dollar General and it is called a "Bed Mattress Top". Then there was 1/2 inch plywood walls connected to the studs. The walls had carpet tacked to the plywood.
We had a hell of a time tearing that stuff out.. is why I know what they did to it... But, you couldn't hear ANYTHING outside of that room.. not even the circular saws that were going to gut the room.

seay.james

Full Access

Joined: 02/06/17

Posts: 17

I don't think there is a "low effort, low impact, easily reverseable" way. I have done research but have not tried these. Browse the audiophile "home theater" boards for more education.

This is what I would investigate.

1. Double-up the sheetrock with spongy "green glue" in between. There is a cheap version of "quietrock" for sale at some home improvement stores. However, "plain-old-sheetrock-doubled-up-with-spongy-glue-in-between" would outperform a single sheet of quietrock.

2. Install a double door meaning within the single-width frame there are 2 doors you must go through. The first opens out into the hallway. The second opens in into the room. The deeper door frame covers the additional sheetrock. Use solid core doors. You see this a lot in doctor offices to block the outside from hearing the conversation inside the room.

3. Install heavy curtain rods the entire length of each wall and hang soundproofing curtains over the walls.

4. Use a heavy/thick area rug with anti-vibration mat(s) as a second layer of carpet underlayment in addition to your typical anti-slip carpet underlayment. Double-up on carpet.

5. I know you don't want to hang stuff on walls but google "picture rails" and install a picture rail on all of the walls. Instead of knocking holes in the wall (or gluing), hang acoustic tiles off of the picture rail. You may find picture rails to be so cool you install them in your entire house. :-)

6. Investigate the insulation around your electrical and HVAC. Sometimes home builders put outlet boxes in adjoining rooms directly across from each other meaning there is no "wall" between the 2 rooms where the outlet boxes are. It's like a big hole in your otherwise effective sound proofing.

(P.S. I really like the soundproof divider idea above. You can probably find used ones at a used office furnature store.)

#4

I don't think there is a "low effort, low impact, easily reverseable" way. I have done research but have not tried these. Browse the audiophile "home theater" boards for more education.

This is what I would investigate.

1. Double-up the sheetrock with spongy "green glue" in between. There is a cheap version of "quietrock" for sale at some home improvement stores. However, "plain-old-sheetrock-doubled-up-with-spongy-glue-in-between" would outperform a single sheet of quietrock.

2. Install a double door meaning within the single-width frame there are 2 doors you must go through. The first opens out into the hallway. The second opens in into the room. The deeper door frame covers the additional sheetrock. Use solid core doors. You see this a lot in doctor offices to block the outside from hearing the conversation inside the room.

3. Install heavy curtain rods the entire length of each wall and hang soundproofing curtains over the walls.

4. Use a heavy/thick area rug with anti-vibration mat(s) as a second layer of carpet underlayment in addition to your typical anti-slip carpet underlayment. Double-up on carpet.

5. I know you don't want to hang stuff on walls but google "picture rails" and install a picture rail on all of the walls. Instead of knocking holes in the wall (or gluing), hang acoustic tiles off of the picture rail. You may find picture rails to be so cool you install them in your entire house. :-)

6. Investigate the insulation around your electrical and HVAC. Sometimes home builders put outlet boxes in adjoining rooms directly across from each other meaning there is no "wall" between the 2 rooms where the outlet boxes are. It's like a big hole in your otherwise effective sound proofing.

(P.S. I really like the soundproof divider idea above. You can probably find used ones at a used office furnature store.)

robihq17

Joined: 07/23/18

Posts: 2

I think you are looking for good quality soundproof curtains. I am using soundproof curtains that are very useful to me. You can use it for your house. From which you can get benefits.

#5

I think you are looking for good quality soundproof curtains. I am using soundproof curtains that are very useful to me. You can use it for your house. From which you can get benefits.

srn23479

Registered User

Joined: 07/15/19

Posts: 1

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#6

If you are looking for noise barrier than can reduce indoor industrial and outdoor street work noise then NoiseBarrierTarp is the best solution. One of the biggest advantage of this noise barrier system is it can be installed with minimal effort as they have a velcro and eyelets seal system.

For more information: noisebarriertarp.com