How's that huntington guitar?

Guitar Tricks Forum > Open Discussion > How's that huntington guitar?

peterncsu

Full Access

Joined: 12/15/18

Posts: 15

Hi All,

My wife gifted me full access with the free Huntington guitar for Christmas, and I'm curious about the quality of the guitar. Naturally I don't expect it to be a great guitar by any means, but knowing nothing about guitars, what are the pluses and minuses to this guitar? When would someone look at upgrading? I'm not above using a cheap guitar by any means to learn on, but when would I benefit from a better guitar?

#1

Hi All,

My wife gifted me full access with the free Huntington guitar for Christmas, and I'm curious about the quality of the guitar. Naturally I don't expect it to be a great guitar by any means, but knowing nothing about guitars, what are the pluses and minuses to this guitar? When would someone look at upgrading? I'm not above using a cheap guitar by any means to learn on, but when would I benefit from a better guitar?

Guitar Tricks Admin

Full Access

Joined: 09/28/05

Posts: 2547

Hi peterncsu,

The huntington guitar would works well for the beginner lessons. It has a classical style to it which makes the neck a bit wider, making general fretting a little easier since there is more space.

I suggest grabbing another guitar when you move onto more electric-guitar driven lessons, or if you seek something that has a bit more bells and whistles. As far as acoustic guitars go, you may eventually want a guitar with a different type of tone, or uses more solid woods, too. It's up to you!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

#2

Hi peterncsu,

The huntington guitar would works well for the beginner lessons. It has a classical style to it which makes the neck a bit wider, making general fretting a little easier since there is more space.

I suggest grabbing another guitar when you move onto more electric-guitar driven lessons, or if you seek something that has a bit more bells and whistles. As far as acoustic guitars go, you may eventually want a guitar with a different type of tone, or uses more solid woods, too. It's up to you!

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

peterncsu

Full Access

Joined: 12/15/18

Posts: 15

Originally Posted by: Guitar

Hi peterncsu,

The huntington guitar would works well for the beginner lessons. It has a classical style to it which makes the neck a bit wider, making general fretting a little easier since there is more space.

I suggest grabbing another guitar when you move onto more electric-guitar driven lessons, or if you seek something that has a bit more bells and whistles. As far as acoustic guitars go, you may eventually want a guitar with a different type of tone, or uses more solid woods, too. It's up to you!

Thanks for the reply! I plan to stick with acoustic, at least that is my current interest. So any "upgrade" would be to another acoustic. Is there anything physically limiting about the Huntington? Or does it really come down to the sound quality?

When you say more space for fretting, are you talking about the space between the strings, or the space between the fret wires? So far early on, I've found it a real struggle to spread my fingers out, and have difficulty reaching with my third finger. I'm the guy who can't do the Spock salute, so separating my 2nd and 3rd fingers is difficult. Are there any guitars with closer fret wires, but good spacing between the strings?

#3

Originally Posted by: Guitar

Hi peterncsu,

The huntington guitar would works well for the beginner lessons. It has a classical style to it which makes the neck a bit wider, making general fretting a little easier since there is more space.

I suggest grabbing another guitar when you move onto more electric-guitar driven lessons, or if you seek something that has a bit more bells and whistles. As far as acoustic guitars go, you may eventually want a guitar with a different type of tone, or uses more solid woods, too. It's up to you!

Thanks for the reply! I plan to stick with acoustic, at least that is my current interest. So any "upgrade" would be to another acoustic. Is there anything physically limiting about the Huntington? Or does it really come down to the sound quality?

When you say more space for fretting, are you talking about the space between the strings, or the space between the fret wires? So far early on, I've found it a real struggle to spread my fingers out, and have difficulty reaching with my third finger. I'm the guy who can't do the Spock salute, so separating my 2nd and 3rd fingers is difficult. Are there any guitars with closer fret wires, but good spacing between the strings?

peterncsu

Full Access

Joined: 12/15/18

Posts: 15

I should mention I'm interested in picking up a Taylor GS Mini after doing a bunch of research. Of course sound is a factor in my decision, but playability I think is my #1 concern while I learn. Anyone able to compare the Taylor GS Mini to the Huntington?

#4

I should mention I'm interested in picking up a Taylor GS Mini after doing a bunch of research. Of course sound is a factor in my decision, but playability I think is my #1 concern while I learn. Anyone able to compare the Taylor GS Mini to the Huntington?

Guitar Tricks Admin

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Joined: 09/28/05

Posts: 2547

The Taylor GS Mini is a really nice guitar! And will probably give you a 'level up' in terms of sound. But it is a smaller guitar overall than the free Huntington.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

#5

The Taylor GS Mini is a really nice guitar! And will probably give you a 'level up' in terms of sound. But it is a smaller guitar overall than the free Huntington.

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact us.

peterncsu

Full Access

Joined: 12/15/18

Posts: 15

Originally Posted by: Guitar

The Taylor GS Mini is a really nice guitar! And will probably give you a 'level up' in terms of sound. But it is a smaller guitar overall than the free Huntington.

I stopped by the local guitar shop today just to test one out. I think the Huntington is perfect to learn on before I step up. Definitely a bit smaller, which I liked, but I didn't really get a feeling that anything was "easier" to play on it vs. the Huntington. So I think I'll stick to this Huntington through the Fundamental courses.

#6

Originally Posted by: Guitar

The Taylor GS Mini is a really nice guitar! And will probably give you a 'level up' in terms of sound. But it is a smaller guitar overall than the free Huntington.

I stopped by the local guitar shop today just to test one out. I think the Huntington is perfect to learn on before I step up. Definitely a bit smaller, which I liked, but I didn't really get a feeling that anything was "easier" to play on it vs. the Huntington. So I think I'll stick to this Huntington through the Fundamental courses.

manXcat

♪It's getting better all the time♫

Joined: 02/17/18

Posts: 982

Hi ☺

The Taylor is a nice guitar for sure, but if it was me (or you unless you're 'price is no objection' flush) I wouldn't be spending that amount of money on a first guitar. Nor do you need to.

My suggestion would be to buy an acoustic guitar to use in lieu of the promo Huntington Classical (?) by all means, but unless you've got a second hand bargain lined up save the spend on a new Taylor until you're concrete in your demonstrated committment and actually know from sustained hands on experience rather than the imagined hypothetical from reading reviews, what you like, or don't, and are in a better position to evaluate from that what will suit you and your purpose.

There is currently a plethora of choice which will serve functionally and tonally just as well as the Taylor for years to come yet without the price tag. Later you can sell with minimal depreciation when you want to buy that Taylor you're now certain is right for you.

Otherwise, the first will serve as your take anywhere hack in future without the concern for theft or handling damage which might preoccupy considerations with an expensive guitar.

♪A little better all the time♫

#7

Hi ☺

The Taylor is a nice guitar for sure, but if it was me (or you unless you're 'price is no objection' flush) I wouldn't be spending that amount of money on a first guitar. Nor do you need to.

My suggestion would be to buy an acoustic guitar to use in lieu of the promo Huntington Classical (?) by all means, but unless you've got a second hand bargain lined up save the spend on a new Taylor until you're concrete in your demonstrated committment and actually know from sustained hands on experience rather than the imagined hypothetical from reading reviews, what you like, or don't, and are in a better position to evaluate from that what will suit you and your purpose.

There is currently a plethora of choice which will serve functionally and tonally just as well as the Taylor for years to come yet without the price tag. Later you can sell with minimal depreciation when you want to buy that Taylor you're now certain is right for you.

Otherwise, the first will serve as your take anywhere hack in future without the concern for theft or handling damage which might preoccupy considerations with an expensive guitar.

♪A little better all the time♫

bonmarriott

Full Access

Joined: 12/01/19

Posts: 3

I think it makes a good biginner guitar. If your having problems with the finger spacing but want to stay with a nylon string there are nylon string guitars on the market now that have a narrow neck, more like an accoustic or electric guitar. Yamaha makes a nice one and inexpensive but great sound and size. Also for accoustic steel string don't lookover the Washburn brand. I've had a few and they have always been good quailty, sound and price. Again Yahama makes some good ones too. Just don't buy a "Brand" of guitar because everyone else has it. Spend some time trying them out first. Sometimes a guitar will just jump out at you almost like saying "Take me".

When your learning it's important to not play around your little finger, in others words use it. Try just one string and one finger per fret. Try to make the little finger reach and play the 5th fret. Just keep at it and it will work. Most important is just have fun playing

#8

I think it makes a good biginner guitar. If your having problems with the finger spacing but want to stay with a nylon string there are nylon string guitars on the market now that have a narrow neck, more like an accoustic or electric guitar. Yamaha makes a nice one and inexpensive but great sound and size. Also for accoustic steel string don't lookover the Washburn brand. I've had a few and they have always been good quailty, sound and price. Again Yahama makes some good ones too. Just don't buy a "Brand" of guitar because everyone else has it. Spend some time trying them out first. Sometimes a guitar will just jump out at you almost like saying "Take me".

When your learning it's important to not play around your little finger, in others words use it. Try just one string and one finger per fret. Try to make the little finger reach and play the 5th fret. Just keep at it and it will work. Most important is just have fun playing

panhandler1956

Full Access

Joined: 09/10/09

Posts: 4

Just got mine yesterday! I sold my classical Alhambra years ago and I'm missing the nylon feel and tone. This little guitar is just what the doctor ordered!

It's starting to settle in after two days of playing (probably 4 hours total) and acclimatizing to my home.

It's far from perfect, but it's definately playable and a load of fun!

Thanks GT!

Brent

Perpetual beginner

2015 Les Paul CM

Boss Katana 100

Other:

1969 Teisco Del Ray ET-220

Traveler Ulta Light Electric

#9

Just got mine yesterday! I sold my classical Alhambra years ago and I'm missing the nylon feel and tone. This little guitar is just what the doctor ordered!

It's starting to settle in after two days of playing (probably 4 hours total) and acclimatizing to my home.

It's far from perfect, but it's definately playable and a load of fun!

Thanks GT!

Brent

Perpetual beginner

2015 Les Paul CM

Boss Katana 100

Other:

1969 Teisco Del Ray ET-220

Traveler Ulta Light Electric

justinpor119

Registered User

Joined: 04/14/20

Posts: 1

Your music teacher may ask you some preliminary questions so that they can get to know you and your musical background better, so you may find it beneficial to prepare some answers and notes ahead of time UPSers Login

#10

Your music teacher may ask you some preliminary questions so that they can get to know you and your musical background better, so you may find it beneficial to prepare some answers and notes ahead of time UPSers Login