Best guitar pick


dnkygirl23
Registered User
Joined: 02/24/22
Posts: 6

Hi,

I am struggling with my strumming and practicing the pentatonic scales. I have been using a Dunlap nylon .60 for strumming but I find it hard to use for navigating scales. Is there a pick that is good for strumming and precision playing the strings? I have tried harder gauge picks like a jazz 3, but it is really hard to use for strumming. I would like to focus on pop, r& b, and neo soul music which is a combination of improv and strumming.


Ast3rix----

# 1
manXcat
Full Access
Joined: 02/17/18
Posts: 1,353

As your technique inmproves you'll be able to use picks like the Jazz III for strumming too. But it will take time. In the meantime.[br][br]Dunlop full size nylons are pretty versatile. Try moving up a gauge or two for discrete note picking along with altering the depth to which you are holding the pick. You should still be able to strum OK with a .73 and it'll be just that little bit more rigid for picking, particularly if held closer to the tip. If that doesn't work, try an .88.[br][br]


# 2
dnkygirl23
Registered User
Joined: 02/24/22
Posts: 6
Originally Posted by: manXcat

As your technique inmproves you'll be able to use picks like the Jazz III for strumming too. But it will take time. In the meantime.[br][br]Dunlop full size nylons are pretty versatile. Try moving up a gauge or two for discrete note picking along with altering the depth to which you are holding the pick. You should still be able to strum OK with a .73 and it'll be just that little bit more rigid for picking, particularly if held closer to the tip. If that doesn't work, try an .88.[br][br]

Thank you!!! I have been experimenting with a variety pack of Dunlop picks and I totally agree with you the .73 does give me more of a sense of control. The torex pick in the pack sounds better to me than the nylon however. I will work with this one for awhile to get use to how ridge it is when strumming. I appreciate the feedback!!!


Ast3rix----

# 3
matonanjin2
Registered User
Joined: 08/11/17
Posts: 357

Picks are such a personal thing. And it depends on type of music and tone you want. Thickness, shape, material, on and on. Get a handful. get a couple handfuls!

or get a sample pack. Lots of artists like V-Picks. https://v-picks.com

Look at a sample pack of theirs. But they are expensive. When I am really wanting ssome nasty tone, I really like his Screamer = https://v-picks.com/shop/ols/products/screamer-in-sapphire-blue

Most of the time I'm playing his Tradtional Lite = https://v-picks.com/shop/ols/products/tradition-lite

or his large pointed lite: https://v-picks.com/shop/ols/products/large-pointed-lite


[u]Guitars:[/u] 2014 PRS Santana, 2013 PRS Paul's, 2009 PRS Hollowbody, 1972 Gibson ES-325, 2012 Fender Strat American Standard, 2012 Yamaha Pacifica, Martin M-36, Martin 000-15M, Seagull S6 Classic[br][u]Amps:[/u] Fender Blues Junior III, Boss Eband JS-10, Line 6 POD 500X, Quilter Microblock 45

# 4
aliasmaximus
Hippie at Heart
Joined: 02/22/22
Posts: 249
Originally Posted by: matonanjin2

When I am really wanting ssome nasty tone, I really like his Screamer

Thanks for the tip! (pun intended). Well named pick, as it looks like you could use that thing as a lethal weapon.


"Whatever you are, be a good one" - Abraham Lincoln

# 5
manXcat
Full Access
Joined: 02/17/18
Posts: 1,353
Originally Posted by: dnkygirl23

The torex pick in the pack sounds better to me than the nylon however. I will work with this one for awhile to get use to how ridge it is when strumming.

[p]

Presuming "torex" was an unintentional typo/misspelling of Tortex? [br][br]Matonanjin2 made the point that one's preferred pick is a very individual thing. I'm only 4 years in myself, and as I've developed the exerience of that journey has revealed to me that versatility or otherwise of any pick in particular depends upon a combination of instrument and genre, practice and experience which bring with them confidence and developed nuance with attack technique for wont of a more apt way of describing it. In the initial couple of years though, I did find that swapping picks for purpose more readily resulted in the attack and tone I wanted.[br][br]I'd endorse the recommendation try out everything at first until you find what you like and what works for you. Even then, never stop being curious. Funnily enough, I love my Dunlop Ultex Jazz IIIs -was an instant love affair from the moment I picked one up, which probably illustrates only that 'pick love' is a process of constantly evolving technique coinciding with discovery, at least for the initial decade insofar as I've discerned at this point in my journey.[br][br]On Tortex. Since I first tried them four years ago I've disliked full size Standard Dunlop Tortex in a typical mid gauge. i.e. .73 (Yellow), and still do illustrating only 'to each their own'. I haven't tried Tortex or Tortex FLEX in their smaller Jazz III iterations around 1.14 or 1.35 which I'd hazard a guess I might just like, as they're not an easily sourced off the shelf item in my neck of the woods inviting opportunity or impulse buy curiosity.[br][br]Bottom line. If you feel comfortable with Tortex and they work for you, go with them, experimenting along the way as you feel so inclined in case you discover something you prefer even more.


# 6
DraconusJLM
Registered User
Joined: 06/21/21
Posts: 360

I've reached a point now where I can use pretty much anything, including coins, and get reasonable results. Just try whatever takes your fancy. Eventually you'll find what works best for you.

Nobody can tell you what pick you should use because nobody has your fingers, wrist, strumming/picking motion etc, etc...

My absolute favourite pick is 1.2mm and made of sterling silver (a gift from my son), which has absolutely zero flexibility, but mostly use a weird piece of 1mm ish thickness pick-shaped plastic I found in a box of electronic components or a .60 Dunlop Tortex (also, because they're bright orange I never lose them - apart from one that fell into the sound hole and stuck somewhere in the struts, although technically it's not lost as I know where it is).


I wish this forum had a "block user" feature. Possibly I'm not the only one......

# 7
Rumble Walrus
Full Access
Joined: 12/30/20
Posts: 158

Dava picks- my local guitar store steered me to the Dava "grip tip" picks. My problem was having the pick fly out of my hand while picking, and rotating in my hand while strumming. The Dava picks have a "bumpy" rubber coating and have a noticeable difference in stiffness when you choke up on the grip.

I have a bit of arthritis in my picking hand so this really helps out a lot.

I'm not familiar with their other offerings but I've swapped totally over to the grip tips.


# 8
koldomonitored
Registered User
Joined: 06/21/22
Posts: 1

I played with a thin Ibanez plectrum, but when I played, I could hear a distinctive crackling of the plectrum on the strings. I've seen more than once musicians playing acoustic guitars with a plectrum, and I didn't hear any noise from it. Then I bought some on Personalized Guitar Picks and a couple of them worked for me. The choice is yours, it also matters what kind of sound you want to achieve… Oh - it's also the material that counts. Too smooth and shiny materials often crumble noticeably into fractions, you get an uneven surface and bumps in the place of grinding, that spoil the sound.


# 9
Sandy Black
Registered User
Joined: 06/06/22
Posts: 3

I use a 1.14 Jazz III for shreddy stuff and strumming


# 10
LisaMcC
Guitar Tricks Instructor
Joined: 11/02/06
Posts: 3,781

I am a big fan of McPherson medium picks. (yellow, kind of triangular in shape)

They have an interesting shape that allows you to try different angles to get your best sound.

Plus, they have a large hole in the middle, which makes the pick MUCH more holdable and stable in your grip.

-Lisa


Lisa McCormick, GT Instructor
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# 11