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Hamberg
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Joined: 01/19/05
Posts: 343
Hamberg
Registered User
Joined: 01/19/05
Posts: 343
03/22/2009 11:43 pm
Originally Posted by: JeffS65Hamberg, I'm curious; with the length of opinion provided, how are you sure of the information you provided was correct. While you conditionally gave correct info, if you didn't watch the video, how do know if it applied at all? As you'd said that contrapuntal playing is for experts, since this is stuff taught at GIT etc, isn't it possible that what he posted may have been an example. I'm by no means an expert but provided a thought on a direction but only doing so after watching the video.


Well, theres no way that I can be certain that what I said applies specifically to the video. However, most of the information that I provided was based on generalizations.

I am very sure that the information is correct.

Perhaps I wasn't entirely clear. Counter point isn't reserved for experts. I was saying that playing both couter point parts, by one musician, depending on the tempo, and complexity of the melody, is reserved for playing levels well beyond expert. I'm not quite sure how counter point is defined on this website, however, simply playing 2 notes at the same time doesn't define counter point. That is actually harmony, and while counter point may contain harmony, it isn't defined by this practice. If you are good enough to play two guitar solos at one time, as a solo musician, then you are playing the accepted definition of counter point. Usually counter point has to be played by two musicians.

The most common technique that I am familiar with, which he is describing, sounds like modulation of the bass note over a higher pitched tonal center. As I said before, I'm not sure what this is called in classical or spanish guitar, but it does have a name.
Bass guitar is the answer to everything