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Whammy bar

see 'Vibrato bar.'

Lessons for: Whammy bar

1: Whammy Bar Waves

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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To really get your surf going we need to check out some whammy bar tricks! When you are using a whammy bar there are a couple of different things you can do. The most common thing is just doing some sort of rhythm over chords. Sometimes it's nice to just give it a bit of sway, combined with the reverb it will sound really cool! Perhaps my favorite use of the whammy bar is the prebend release. What you do is you hold a chord or note and you press down the whammy before hitting the chord, then you strum it and release and you get a real spooky sound going.

2: Whammy Bar-O-Rama

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Now we are ready to tackle both guitar solos heard in the song. Each one features a wide variety of involved techniques along with some very loose feedback and whammy bar stuff that is equal parts blues, surf, and punk. Make sure you are good and warmed up here as both solos have some involved elements, along with some loose playing you can interpret in your own way.



3: Guitar Tricks 39: Whammy Bar Lesson

  • Focus: Channel
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This week Neal takes a lesson request from chaos2themaxx on how to use the whammy bar. He'll give you some awesome tips on how it works and how to use it. Tip of the week is on feedback control. We have sound limitations in the studio so the feedback tip is not at full volume level and you won't hear the effect but if you follow the tip you'll be in feedback heaven!



4: Arpeggios: Whammy Bar Squeals

  • Focus: Tricks
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No one needs a whammy pedal! This is how you do whammy bar squeals in the style of Dimebag Darrel of Pantera. There's just something about these high pitch squeals. I can sit for hours playing these! You will need a whammy bar for this example. A Floyd Rose type system works best, but a strat will do too.





5: Beck Style: Whammy Bar

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Beck's best friend is the tremolo arm (or as said in America, "whammy bar"). His use of the bar is so seamless that it's difficult to hear when he does and does not use it sometimes it's so subtle. Pay close attention to pre-bends and the tuning of the bends. Play with me during this lesson to help get tuning and timing down. Even though this lesson has no fast picking, it's one of the most difficult techniques to master on the instrument.

6: Blues Vibrato Bar Techniques & Licks

  • Focus: Technique
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In this tutorial we will learn 3 whammy bar tricks to spice up your blues playing technique. If you haven't already seen it, you might benefit from this earlier tutorial that covered mechanical, technical aspects of the vibrato bar: Whammy Bar from the Beginning Once you got your system to function properly and stay in tune, the two most important aspects of using the vibrato bar are: pitch and rhythm. 1. You should be aware of the pitch you are attempting to achieve with the bar. 2. You shoul...

7: Vibrato Bar Blues Play Along

  • Focus: Technique
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In this lesson we'll play the tricks along with a backing track. It's important to use what you learn, so we are going to practice what we've learned in this tutorial. Have fun playing the blues with your whammy bar!





8: Basic Vibrato Bar Technique & Licks

  • Focus: Technique
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In this tutorial we will look at some basic vibrato bar techniques and licks. The vibrato bar has many alternate names or nicknames: whammy bar, tremolo bar, wang bar, wiggle stick. In fact on the original Fender Stratocasters the text under the logo on the headstock reads, "With Synchronized Tremolo". Which is a misnomer! In this tutorial we will have a look at how it works, why it's called vibrato bar and how to use it!



9: 4. Guitar Parts & Functions, Vibrato Bar

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of lessons covers the functional aspects of various parts of a Stratocaster style electric guitar. Also covered is a Gibson style for comparison and contrast. In this fourth lesson I explain how the vibrato bar (also called a whammy bar) works.





10: 16 Bar Blues Intro

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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In this tutorial we are going to learning how to play a jazzy 16 Bar Blues in C. Often, we hear of the 12 Bar Blues. But blues doesn't have to be 12 bars or measures! It can be any number of bars or measures that you want. And there are many variations on the blues. You can vary the number of bars, or the chord progression used, or the order of the chords. In this tutorial we will get a 16 bar blues essentially by extending the IV & V chord measures and the turnaround to add 4 more measures to our typical 12 bar form. We will flesh out the turnaround by usi...

11: 16 Bar Blues Play Along

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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Finally we put it all together and play our 16 bar blues along with a backing track! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. If you look for more ways to spice up your blues playing, you might find these tutorials valuable: 12 Bar Blues Form 12 Bar Blues in E for Beginners! E Blues Rhythm & Lead: Series 1 E Blues Rhythm & Lead: Series 2 G Blues Rhythm...



12: Blasting the 12 Bar Blues

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The song is essentially a 12 bar blues in G minor. The progression is as follows: || Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Cm7 | Cm6 | Gm7 | Gm7 | Eb | D7sus | Gm7 | Gm7|| You may notice the use of a 6 to 5 turnaround here instead of the classic 5 to 4. This is pretty common in a minor blues! The G minor, or the 1 chord, is treated with the signature rhythm from the intro. The C minor is played as a minor 7 on the 8th fret for the first measure then a C minor 6 chord on the second measure. The rhythm here matches the triple feel with added muting in between and a double stroke ...

13: Intro: Variations of the 12 Bar Form

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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The 12 bar form is not a rule or any kind of exact science, and through the years it has been altered in countless ways. In this tutorial we're going to play through some of the most common variations that you come across, when you listen to and play the blues.





14: Conclusion to Variations on 12 Bar Form

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Today we've covered some of the most common variations of the 12 bar form. There are literally hundreds of variations that you're gonna come across, so think of today's examples as templates. Even if it's not the exact example that we played today, you'll now be able to recognize the sound of the bVI, for example, and figure the rest out from there.





15: Guitar Tricks 13: Easy 12 Bar Blues Progression

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This week we've got a lesson on 12-Bar Blues. Neal takes you through the basic progression and gives you a strong foundation on which to build.





16: Memorizing 12 Bar Blues Form

  • Focus: Theory
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In this lesson we are going to start practicing playing the right chords in the right order for our 12 Bar Blues Form in A Major. For the purposes of this tutorial we will only play (strum) each chord once on the 1st beat (the beginning) of each measure. We are going to do this in order to simply focus on committing to memory the timing of the chord changes of the form. A - I (one chord) 4 measures D - IV (four chord) 2 measures A - I (one chord) 2 measures E - V (five chord) 2 measures A - I (one chord) 2 measures...

17: 12 Bar Blues Form Backing Track

  • Focus: Theory
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In this lesson I show you how to play along with the backing track, the 12 Bar Blues Form in A Major. It is the exact same audio backing track that you can download from the link below this text, near the bottom of this lesson page.





18: 12 Bar Blues Form Conclusion

  • Focus: Theory
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Now you've been introduced to the First Law of the Blues, the 12 Bar Blues Form. Since this is such an important concept to grasp make sure you understand it before you move on to the next set of lessons in this Blues Style Course! It is so important because it forms the basis of the Blues Music Repertoire. It is a common form that has been used by Blues composers and players since the beginning of its appearance in the early 1900s. It is so useful that it is still in use to this day and still going strong. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. If ...

19: Talk About It: Outro Whammy

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Guitar 3 enters the mix in the outro with some wild whammy bar aggression. Start it out with some bold feedback, then grab the whammy bar with some reckless abandon. This isn't the kind of part to be learned note-for-note, although I've taught it in the ballpark of what is on the recording. Rather, take the concept and run with it here to tap into your own improvisation and expression. It's all about the attitude!



20: She Cried More: Whammy Fills

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The lead guitar plays some wild 80s style whammy dive bomb fills using harmonics. Both of these fills use harmonics on the B string. The first is on the 5th fret, the last is on the 4th fret. Go nuts here once you've grabbed the note! With the first fill you can go as wild as you want with the whammy shakes, while the second one (in the outro) has more of a specific rhythm to the bar work.



21: Guitar Tricks 53: Whammy Technique on a Standard Guitar

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This week on the channel Neal takes a request: how to make a standard guitar sound like it has a whammy bar. If you only use the whammy technique once in a while or you're stuck with a non-whammy fitted axe, this lesson will give you some good pointers. The tip of the week: how to make a standard tuned guitar sound like a drop tuned guitar.





22: Big City: 12 Bar Blues Progression

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The song "Bright Lights, Big City" is based on the 12 bar blues (also known as basic blues changes). The 12 bar blues progression is one of the most common chord progressions in popular music (the Guitar Tricks blues courses have lots of lessons that can get you up to speed on this). The 12 bar blues is based on the I-IV-V chords of a key. Since we're going to be learning this song in the key of A, those chords are A (the I chord); D (the IV), and E (the V). The 12 bar blues in the key of A would be: || A | A | A | A | D | D | A | A | E | D | A | A ||

23: Rock the 12 Bar Form

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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In this lesson I'm going to show you a classic progression called the "12 bar form", which is most commonly associated with the blues, but also used heavily in country, rock, and many other styles of music. The 12 bar form can be played in any key, but in this lesson we'll play it in the key of A.





24: Experimenting with the 12 Bar Form

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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In this period the songwriting become more experimental and often strayed from the traditional 12 bar form, but it still stayed in the blues realm harmonically. In this lesson I'll show you an example of this type of chord progression, and in the following lessons we'll turn that chord progression into our blues rock practice tune.





25: Have Mercy: 12 Bar Blues Progression

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Now that we've looked at the elements of this song, let's fit them all into the 12 bar blues progression in the key of G.





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