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Guitar Lessons (855) EZ-GUITAR

  • Guitar Glossary


Triad

A group of three notes upon which a chord is based. A C minor triad consists of C, Eb and G. These are the key components of both major and minor chords, and include the I, III and V notes.

Lessons for: Triad

1: D Major Triad on the E, B, and G Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of a D major chord (D, F#, and A,) we are going to look at all three triad inversions up the E, B, and G strings. All will be played with an open D string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use those D major triad inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of Pete Townsend (The Who.) Adding some overdrive and reverb, we are now able to hear these major triads in a rock guitar context.



2: A Major Triad on the B, G, and D Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of an A major chord (A, C#, and E,) we are going to take a look at all three triad inversions up the B, G, and D strings. All will be played with an open A string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use those A major triad inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of Tom Higgenson (The Plain White T's.) The tone for this example will be played clean to replicate an acoustic guitar in a pop rock musical setting.

3: E Major Triad on the G, D, and A Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of an E major chord (E, G# and B,) we are going to take a look at all three triad inversions up the G, D, and A strings. All will be played with an open E string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use those E major triad inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of Dave Grohl (The Foo Fighters.) A good amount of distortion is applied to these low voicings to create a nice modern rock rhythm sound.



4: C Major Triad on the D, A, and E Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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We are now moving over to triads and inversions using the D, A, and E string grouping; leaving us without an open string to reference. We will take a look at these inversions using the notes of a C major triad (C, E, and G). This is to conclude the string grouping concept and to also introduce these new and interesting chord shapes. We will than use those C major triad inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of Jimi Hendrix. A slight muting with the right hand will be applied to fully maximize the rhythmic dynamic of these low chord voicings.

5: D Minor Triad on the E, B, and G Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of a D minor chord (D, F, A), we are going to look at all three triad inversions up the E, B, and G strings.  All will be played with an open D string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use those D minor triads and inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of David Gilmour (Pink Floyd.) A clean sound is used for this example while still retaining an aggressive attack with the right hand.



6: A Minor Triad on the B, G, and D Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of an A minor chord (A, C, E), we are going to look at all three triad inversions up the B, G and D strings. All will be played with an open A string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use all three A minor triad inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of Eddie Van Halen. A slight muting is used along with playing these triads as arpeggios to create this affect with distortion.



7: E Minor Triad on the G, D, and A Strings

  • Focus: Chords
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Using the notes of an E minor chord (E, G, B), we are going to look at all three triad inversions up the G, D, and A strings. All will be played with an open E string ringing as a reference tone. We will than use those E minor triads and inversions to play a rock rhythm example in the style of John Frusciante (Red Hot Chili Peppers.) A clean tone is used along with a strong rhythmic right hand pattern to create this effect.



8: C Minor Triad on the D, A, and E Strings

  • Focus: Rhythm Guitar
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We are now moving over to minor triad inversions using the D, A, and E string grouping; leaving us without an open string to reference.  We will take a look at these inversions using the notes of a C minor triad (C, Eb, and G.)  This is to conclude the string grouping concept and to also introduce these new and interesting chord shapes. We will than take a look at all three triads and inversions and play them in the style of Andy Hurley and Patrick Stump (Fall Out Boy.) A slight muting with the right hand will be applied to fully maximize the rhythmic dynamic of these l...

9: Blinded By Thirst: Triad Section

  • Focus: Song
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In this lesson I'm gonna show you the triad part that the solo ends with and everything that happens behind it. The triad part can be quite confusing when you first try to learn it, but just make sure to build it beat for beat and take it really slowly. While the triad part is happening, guitar 3 harmonizes a line with the bass that I'll show you as well.





10: The Triad Remix

  • Focus: Lead Guitar
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For this lesson I am going to change things up a little bit by adding some more chords into the mix along with shifting away from the scale approach of the past few lessons. Playing in the key of Bmi, we are going to play a four bar progression consisting of one bar of each of the following chords: | Bmi - B, D, F# D - D, F#, A Emi - E, G, B A - A, C#, E Instead of looking at these chords from a scale perspective, I am going to play a solo lick which simply plays the triad shapes of each chord. Notice how ...

11: Minor Triad Inversions 3

  • Focus: Chords
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Here are the most common minor triad inversion shapes for strings 3, 4, and 5. We'll use an E minor triad to demonstrate. Don't be afraid to use all of your minor triad inversions from the other strings over this track either. It will help you learn all the shapes, but make sure you play them all in E minor. This example is spiced up with a little tremelo and some overdrive and played in the style of Marty Stuart and The Fabulous Superlatives.

12: Minor Triad Inversions 2

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Let's take what we learned about minor triad inversions and apply that to the inversions on strings 2, 3, and 4. The best way to demonstrate this is with an A Minor chord. We'll demonstrate these triads in the style of Dolly Parton or Reba.





13: Minor Triad Inversions 1

  • Focus: Chords
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Now that we've covered the most common major triad inversions, we will cover the minor triad inversions. If you know your major inversions, this section will be easy. We will simply alter one note in each of our inversion shapes to play minor triad inversions. The note altered is the 3rd of the chord. Since we are using D minor in this lesson to illustrate the inversions on strings 1, 2, and 3, the note in each chord that we have altered is an F. If you know your D major inversions from a previous lesson, this adjustment should be a piece of cake. We'll try putting these in...

14: Major Triad Inversions 3

  • Focus: Chords
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In this lesson we'll learn three more triad inversions transferred onto strings 4, 5, and 6. The best chord shape to demonstrate this is the E Major Triad. Put this Root Position, First Inversion and Second Inversion triad into your vocabulary and we'll put it into some real time examples to really solidify the concept.





15: Major Triad Inversions 1

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Here we'll take a look at inverting a simple D Major Triad. I'll show you how we figure out the notes of the triad and how they are arranged on strings 1, 2, and 3 to form the three inversions used. Spend extra time learning the notes of each inversion and the distance on the fretboard from one inversion to the next. This will prove valuable in this lesson series.



16: Major Triad Inversions 2

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In this lesson we'll transfer what we know about triad inversions onto strings 2, 3, and 4. We'll do this with a simple A Major triad. We'll also introduce three important terms that tell you what to call each inversions: root position, first inversion, and second inversion. Root Position is just that. The root of the chord (in this case, an "A") is the lowest sounding of the three notes played. In First Inversion, the 3rd of the chord (in this case, a "C#") is the lowest sounding of the three notes. In Second Inversion, the 5th of the chord (in this case, an "E") is ...

17: Introduction to Triad Inversions

  • Focus: Chords
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Before tackling triad inversions, let us review a few concepts that are integral to understanding how these new chords will work. A triad is a group of three notes. The open and barre chords we've learned so far are all triads because they all contain three different notes. The three different notes are based on the interval, or distance, of a third. We'll show you how to use the major scale here to find the thirds that form a triad. The thirds that form a triad may be doubled or even tripled in a chord, as you'll find is the case with most open and barre ...

18: Bluesy Minor Triad Sweeping

  • Focus: Artist
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Another widely copied aspect of Blackmore's lead playing style is his use of arpeggios. In particular, this example shows how he used sweep picking arpeggios combined with bluesy bends and slides.





19: Last Train: Changes and Form

  • Focus: Song
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The main riff carries you through much of the song, but there's some changes. At the end of the verses, we go to a C7, the IV chord, and play an alternating bass line in a sort of country style, then to a D7 chord to tag it, then back into the main riff and repeat the whole verse. Then a brief interlude occurs: the vocals then do a fast repeating rhythmic "deh-deh-deh-deh-deh, deh-deh-deh" phrase, under which the bass holds a G pedal and the guitar plays a G triad to a 1st inversion F triad, which forms a suspended chord due to the bass playing the G under it. Each chor...

20: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 2

  • Focus: Chords
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We can make our chords, and therefore our music, much more interesting if we realize that we do not have to use the 1st note of the scale on the bottom of every chord. We can change the order of the three scale notes (1st, 3rd and 5th) to get more variety in the sound of the chords we play. If we play the scale notes from lowest to highest pitchwise in the original order 1st, 3rd and 5th, the result is called a Root Position Triad. C major chord in Root Position: C (1) - E (3) - G (5) If we leave off the bottom note and make the 3rd th...

21: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 3

  • Focus: Chords
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In this lesson I emphasize two important concepts that triad inversions opens up. The first is that by using inversions we can make our chords, and therefore our music, much more interesting; more rich, complex and beautiful. We can start to look at using chords not simply as static shapes, but as three simultaneous voices that each have their own unique qualities in the overall fabric of the music. The second is that these different voicings are very powerful tools once we understand and apply them because they enable us view and use the entire fretboard. We ...

22: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 4

  • Focus: Chords
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In this lesson we will apply the concept of a triad chord voicing and subsequent chord inversion voicings to minor chords. Minor chords are defined as the 1st, 3rd & 5th note of a minor scale played (or regarded as a unit) at the same time. In this example we will use the C minor scale to isolate a C minor chord. C minor scale: C (1) - D (2) - E-flat (3) - F (4) - G (5) - A-flat (6) - B-flat (7) C minor chord: C (1) - E-flat (3) - G (5) Played together this results in the triad of a C minor chord played in it's ...

23: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 6

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More triad inversion chord voicing practice! In this lesson the exercise has been changed to start on a C major chord in first inversion. Then, we move to a root position F major, back to C major, to a second inversion G major. Finally we return to the first inversion C major to start the whole thing over again. Repeat as many times as necessary to get it solidly under your fingers!



24: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 7

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Even more triad inversion chord voicing practice! In this lesson the exercise has been changed to start on a C major chord in second inversion. Then, we move to a first inversion F major, back to C major, to a root position G major. Finally we return to the second inversion C major to start the whole thing over again. Repeat as many times as necessary to get it solidly under your fingers!



25: Intro to Triads & Inversions: Lesson 8

  • Focus: Chords
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This time we are going to practice triad inversion chord voicings with minor chords! In this lesson the exercise starts on a C minor chord in root position. Then, we move to a second inversion F minor, back to C minor, to a first inversion G minor. Finally we return to the root position C minor to start the whole thing over again. Repeat as many times as necessary to get it solidly under your fingers!



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