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Guitar Lessons (855) EZ-GUITAR

  • Guitar Glossary


Neck width

The width of the neck, from the low E string side to the high E string side. Usually measured at the nut and 12th fret separately, because the size is different at each. Only classical guitars or ones with additional strings are likely to have thicker necks.

Lessons for: Neck width

1: Attaching the Bolt-On Neck to the Body

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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In this video I'll show you how to attach the bolt-on neck to the guitar body. The whole of the guitar neck has the fretboard and the headstock, and can also have truss rods inside to keep the neck straight.





2: Necks/Fretboards: Maple Neck/Rosewood Fingerboard

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this first part I feature a maple bolt-on neck with a rosewood fingerboard (or fretboard).





3: Necks/Fretboards: Maple Neck/Maple Fingerboard

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this second part I feature a bolt-on maple neck with a maple fingerboard (or fretboard). This is sometimes called a maple cap.





4: Cleaning The Strings, Neck & Body

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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It's important to keep your guitar clean to make sure it sounds as good as possible and that it lasts as long as possible. Every time you finish playing you should wipe down the strings and all the surfaces. Cleaning the strings will improve their life span. Make sure you wipe the surfaces (body, neck) of the guitar with a non-abrasive cloth. A soft cotton cloth works best. You can use any spray cleaner that is designed for guitar surfaces. But in my experience a dry cloth works best. If you have to get gunk off, then a damp cloth first, then a dry one to follow!

5: Blues Riff: Movin' It Up The Neck!

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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In this lesson I'm gonna show you how to move the blues riff from the open position and up the neck. This requires some left hand finger stretching that can be pretty hard at first, but you just have to keep doing it and you'll get there!





6: Over the Neck Practice Exercises

  • Focus: Lead Guitar
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Now that we're almost at the end of this tutorial, let me show how you can use a metronome to work on the different mini-positions. I realize that it can be overwhelming to look down at the giant fretboard and try to recognize all these different patterns and notes. But just remember that it's really all the same notes repeating again and again, and there's no rush with getting familiar with every corner of it all. You can explore it at your own pace, whenever you feel ready for it. And in the meantime you can just be extra creative with the notes you already know and m...

7: All Over the Neck Tone

  • Focus: Lead Guitar
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For this tutorial I'm going to be using my Gibson 335 on the middle pickup, and I'll be running that through a modeled version of a Vox AC30 amp with a little bit of reverb. In front of that I'm adding a Fuzz pedal with a pretty basic fuzz tone dialed in, nothing crazy. So you can use whatever overdrive or distortion you have instead. I'm also adding a subtle delay tail with a quite delay volume and just one repeat, just to add a little extra ambience.

8: Randy Rhoads Style: Fun Bend Trick

  • Focus: Artist
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Next, we're going to learn another trick Randy used for maximum expression: using the neck of the guitar to bend a note. After playing a note, you press on the body of the guitar with your right hand and arm, towards your body, and grasp the headstock with your left hand and push away from your body. This bends the neck slightly, and results in a downward pitch bend.



9: Necks/Fretboards: Scalloped Maple

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this third part I feature a bolt-on maple neck that has been scalloped. Since this neck was originally a solid piece of maple, it has no separate fretboard piece. It's a non-cap.





10: Way Up High!

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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When you really wanna "tear it up" it works really well playing the familiar pattern of the blues scale UP AN OCTAVE! You can play the same licks and they will have a very different and cool sound. You will most likely have to consider some alternative fingering, because the frets are so small up there. Once I've shown you how to find this pattern, we'll take turns playing four bars with the backing track.



11: Removing The Old Strings

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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The first step is to make sure you have all the tools you need for the job. 1. String winder 2. New strings 3. Wire snips or cutters 4. Appropriate sized Allen wrench 5. Phillips screw driver 6. Cleaning cloth 7. Old toothbrush First, remove the old strings. Loosen them first so you don't add unnecessary tension to the neck. The you can cut them. It's best to cut them in the middle of closer to the nut. Cutting them too close to the bridge can make it difficult to remove them from a Fender style bridge. If a sting breaks at the bridge you can use p...

12: Different Pickup, Different Timbre

  • Focus: Theory
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You can use the same exact notes of a melody and harmony, but get a completely different sound or timbre by changing the pickup! You can also change your effects, or amp settings to try something new. In this lesson I show how just changing from the neck pickup with it's bassy, warm tone, to the bridge pickup with a brighter, more trebly tone can make the parts stand out from each other. Normally, using the same pickup and tone setup will make the parts blend. But this approach is good for making them slightly distinct from each other.

13: Love In Vain: Gear, Tone, and Tuning

  • Focus: Song
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On this recording you hear a steel-string acoustic and an electric slide guitar. For the acoustic part I'll be using this Martin-style "VKV" acoustic, and I'll be using a medium pick. I'll be getting the tone that you hear in this video from a combination of this built-in L.R. Baggs pickup/microphone and the overhead mic that I'm also talking through. One thing that's very noticeable on the recording is the very intense "compression" that you hear. Compression is an effect you often add when you record that basically evens out the dynamics by lowering the volume of the loud...

14: Shoot 'Em Up: Guitar 2 Pre Chorus 2

  • Focus: Song
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Guitar 2 thickens up the second pre-chorus with some meaty octaves. This is a great way to build the arrangement! We are ascending up the neck hitting the root notes of the chords underneath. Dig in and make it exciting!





15: Too Much Anger: Guitar 2 Outro Solo

  • Focus: Song
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Guitar 2 lays into some climactic leads in the outro chorus. It kicks off with some ascending bends that build up the neck, then it rips into a furious lick and pick slide, leading us to the final trill lick and climax of the song. Dig in with plenty of attitude and aggression!





16: It Must Be Love: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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For this song you'll get the best results with a steel-string acoustic, but if you don't have that you can also play the rhythm part on a nylon string guitar or even on an electric guitar with a clean tone and on the neck pickup. But again, the best results will come from strumming a steel-string guitar with a medium pick. I'll be using this Martin-style VKV and I'll be getting the sound that you hear in the video from a combination of my built-in L.R. Baggs pickup/microphone and the overhead mic that I'm also talking through. For the electric guitar I'll be using the...

17: Little Red Rooster: Gear, Tone & Tuning

  • Focus: Song
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Whenever you try to hone in on a certain blues tone it's important to keep your eyes on the end result and not get distracted by the tools used to get there. The old blues guys definitely knew what kind of sound they wanted, but they typically used whatever gear they had to obtain it. So rather than focusing on what particular guitar, pedal or amp to use, try to focus on getting similar results and effects out of whatever gear you have. One of the main things that distinguish different blues tones is that some players like a darker and more muddy tone while some prefer the ...

18: Sunshine Skies: Guitar 3 - Verse

  • Focus: Song
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Guitar 3 strums along with the acoustic using different chord shapes in the verses. The phaser effect on this guitar adds a cool dimension and really emphasizes the percussive nature of the strums, adding to the overall groove. The capo is optional here, as we aren't using any open strings in any of the parts. We are playing inversions of the chords up the neck at the 6th position, using a slightly different strum.



19: Slipping Away: Outro Guitar 2

  • Focus: Song
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In the outro, guitar two continues to play staccato stabs on the backbeat higher on the neck, but vamps along with the D and G chords instead of playing the progression that we played earlier.





20: Predicts My Fate: Guitar 2 Verse 3

  • Focus: Song
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The third verse contains several great fills and licks from Guitar 2. There’s a whole range of great country-influenced licks here both up the neck and down low. There’s lots of opportunity here to dig in and express yourself with these great licks.





21: The Boys Of Summer (For Beginners): Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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For this song I'll be using my Martin-style "VKV" acoustic, and I'll be strumming the strings with a medium pick. I'll be getting the tone that you hear in this video from a combination of this built-in L.R. Baggs pickup/microphone and the overhead mic that I'm also talking through. After the performance has been recorded I'll also add some hall reverb to add a little extra drama. If you play this song acoustically in a room you'll have to make do with whatever natural reverb the room provides, and that will be fine as well. But if you ever record this song or perform it li...

22: Strutter: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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If you want to get a super thick hard rockin' tone for this tune in the comfort of your living room, all you're going to need is a solid body electric guitar with a decent tube amp that has a medium to high gain pre-amp section. If you want to nail it spot on, a guitar with a Mahogany body and a Marshall tube amp will do the trick. Here's the Line 6 POD settings and gear I used: Amp Model: Brit Class A Cab: Factory for this amp model Bass: 7 Mid: 8 Treble: 8.5 No effects used Guitar: Gibson Les Paul 
Pickups: Seymour Duncan JB59 in the bridge/ Pearly Gates in t...

23: A Thing or Two: Intro Guitar 2

  • Focus: Song
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Guitar two plays the same chords as guitar one, but plays inversions up an octave to really fill out the higher register that's missing in the power chords. It also only accents the triplet hits at the beginning of each chord and then just rings out - leaving the rhythm guitar room to play that busy blues riff. We just slide this same shape all over the neck. On the last chord of each phrase though we accent the back beat with a slightly different strumming pattern again to leave room for the rhythm guitar.

24: I'm Feeling Outshined: Guitar Solo

  • Focus: Song
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We'll start the solo with holding a double stop - the notes C and E on the G and B string. Hold it and give it a just very slight bend at the end and land on A on the D string. Next we go into a really interesting double stop phrase where we'll do a lot of rhythmic hits going between the double stops. Notice the little bend in the beginning of the lick. You're going to notice that - in true Soundgarden fashion - this solo has a lot of very different rhythmic elements to it, and the next lick is no exception. Take time and listen to what this phrase actually sounds like. ...

25: Play Along With 'Three Long Days'

  • Focus: Song
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Are you ready? In this lesson, it's you, me, and the band, playing 'Three Long Days', in the key of E. Don't worry if the C#m hybrid in the bridge gives you trouble at this point - you can always just hang back and re-join me on the easier chords in the chorus and the verses. And remember, the chord is shaped exactly like one of your old friends, the A minor. It is just placed higher on the neck. Try to use that familiar touch-point to help you get it under your belt. Remember, you'll find the lyrics and chords under the 'Image' tab below the video, and you can...

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