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  • Guitar Glossary


Neck width

The width of the neck, from the low E string side to the high E string side. Usually measured at the nut and 12th fret separately, because the size is different at each. Only classical guitars or ones with additional strings are likely to have thicker necks.

Lessons for: Neck width

1: Attaching the Bolt-On Neck to the Body

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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In this video I'll show you how to attach the bolt-on neck to the guitar body. The whole of the guitar neck has the fretboard and the headstock, and can also have truss rods inside to keep the neck straight.





2: Necks/Fretboards: Maple Neck/Rosewood Fingerboard

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this first part I feature a maple bolt-on neck with a rosewood fingerboard (or fretboard).





3: Necks/Fretboards: Maple Neck/Maple Fingerboard

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this second part I feature a bolt-on maple neck with a maple fingerboard (or fretboard). This is sometimes called a maple cap.





4: Blues Riff: Movin' It Up The Neck!

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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In this lesson I'm gonna show you how to move the blues riff from the open position and up the neck. This requires some left hand finger stretching that can be pretty hard at first, but you just have to keep doing it and you'll get there!





5: Randy Rhoads Style: Fun Bend Trick

  • Focus: Artist
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Next, we're going to learn another trick Randy used for maximum expression: using the neck of the guitar to bend a note. After playing a note, you press on the body of the guitar with your right hand and arm, towards your body, and grasp the headstock with your left hand and push away from your body. This bends the neck slightly, and results in a downward pitch bend.



6: Necks/Fretboards: Scalloped Maple

  • Focus: Gear And Tone
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This series of videos covers various types of necks and fretboards used to make electric guitars! In this third part I feature a bolt-on maple neck that has been scalloped. Since this neck was originally a solid piece of maple, it has no separate fretboard piece. It's a non-cap.





7: Way Up High!

  • Focus: Style Tutorial
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When you really wanna "tear it up" it works really well playing the familiar pattern of the blues scale UP AN OCTAVE! You can play the same licks and they will have a very different and cool sound. You will most likely have to consider some alternative fingering, because the frets are so small up there. Once I've shown you how to find this pattern, we'll take turns playing four bars with the backing track.



8: Even Flow: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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First let's talk a little bit about the gear and tones that I'll be using for this song. As always it's really important to remember that you can play a song like this on whatever gear you may have, and if you play the parts well, it's most likely going to sound great. It's going to sound more like the original if you have the same gear, but that doesn't mean it can't be different in a cool way, when you play it on your own gear. So always keep that in mind! For the rhythm guitar that plays the lower parts in the open tuning I'll be using a Les Paul on the bridge pickup,...

9: Black: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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First let's talk a little bit about the gear and tones that I'll be using for this song, but as always you have to remember that you rarely need any specific gear to be able to play a given song. It's of course going to sound more like the original if you have the same gear, but that doesn't mean it can't be different in a cool way, when you play it on whatever gear you have. So always keep that in mind when we're talking gear. For the rhythm guitar that plays the strumming parts and the power chords in the choruses, I'll be using a Les Paul, and I'll be running that th...

10: Moving To The IV & V Chords

  • Focus: Lead Guitar
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We're going to take the whole riff and fill combination and move it down the fretboard to play the IV & V chords of our 12 bar blues. Since we're in C, the IV chord is F and the V chord is G. Playing the F and G versions of this riff and fill will be a challenge all it's own! We'll also play the F & G in a different location on the neck so we can have a little variety in tone. This is the same exact idea, but by putting the F & G riff and fill in a different location we can make it easier to play.

11: Superman: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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"Superman" features just one acoustic guitar and one electric guitar. Guitar #1 is our main guitar which will be our acoustic in standard tuning, using medium strings with mixture of strumming, picked arpeggios and some hybrid picking to play the piano intro. Guitar #2 is our electric guitar that comes in during the bridge, as well as the final round of choruses at the end of the song. I am using a single coil guitar using some overdrive and reverb to help cut through the mix. You can see the tone and effect settings below the video. Guitar #2: Dual Humbucker, ...

12: Hear My Train a Comin': Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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To play this song all you will need is a guitar. It was originally played on an acoustic 12 string guitar tuned down 4 half steps. Today I am playing a Taylor six string tuned down 4 half steps but I will be referring to the notes and chords in standard tuning. So, the absolute pitches of the open strings I'm using are as follows. Low E string tuned down to C. A string tuned down to F. D string tuned down to B-flat. G string tuned down to E-flat. B string tuned down to G. High E string tuned down to C. However the key we'll refer to is E. So, even though my...

13: Little Wing (Beg): Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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Since this lesson focuses on the rhythm of the song and not the leads, I'll be using an acoustic guitar. But you can apply the same chord progression taught here to electric and it will sound great. If you've got a Stratocaster, even better! If you're using an electric guitar, you'll want to use the neck pickup with no overdrive since the tone here is mostly clean. This sounds especially good with single coil pickups like Hendrix used. The best pickup choice is the neck pickup or neck and middle pickup. Use a light-handed strumming technique on this song to help c...

14: The Wind Cries Mary (Beg): Gear and Tone

  • Focus: Song
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This song can be played on acoustic or electric guitar. On acoustic, it can be a real finger strength workout to fret all the barre chords. Electric will be easier. If your electric guitar has single coil pickups this will get you closest to the sound we are looking for here, if you have a Stratocaster, even better! A single coil pickup in the neck position will is recommended, to dial it in even more turn your tone knob down to about 5-7 for a warmer, bassy tone.

15: The Wind Cries Mary (Beg): Intro Chords

  • Focus: Song
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The intro chords are 3 chords played chromatically up to the F chord. Chromatically is just a fancy way of saying that each chord is one fret from the neck. This is played 4 times. We're starting on the Eb major here, going up to the E major, then the F major and we'll be using a 3-note power chord.





16: Back Door Man: Introduction & Gear

  • Focus: Song
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Whats up people! This is Henrik for Guitar Tricks and today we're going to learn how to play the old blues jam "Back Door Man", as made famous by Willie Dixon. We're be taking a look at two guitars today and we're going to focus on sitting in the groove and just nailing the sweet spot of the pocket. Guitar 1 is going to play a funky little phrase during the verses and choruses and a sweet blues solo with some really interesting licks and rhythms. Guitar 2 is going to be a guitar tuned to open G and we're going to outline the progression with a slide. This guitar is really s...

17: Pali Gap: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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To play this song you will need an electric guitar, an amp, overdrive and a uni-vibe. Today I am playing a Fender Strat through an Ibanez Tube Screamer (gain at 2, volume 6, tone 7) into a Boss GS-10 amp simulator and effects module. Guitar one is set to the neck pick-up and has a light amount of gain so that it breaks up when you hit it hard or cleans up when you play lighter. Guitar 2 is set to bridge pick-up and has a uni-vibe effect which adds a nice motion and compliments guitar 1. Ultimately, this song can be played on any guitar through any amp and with...

18: The Dead of Night: Song Intro

  • Focus: Song
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This is the signature riff for "Blackbird", recognizable by almost anyone who has heard this song even once before. Only two bars long, we see some sneaky timing right out the gate here. Starting in 3/4, with 3 chords receiving one beat each the first bar acts as a walk-up (G, Am7, G/B) then sliding up the neck in what is referred to as a "glissando" for another higher G chord, this bar held for four beats (4/4 time). Fret the 5th string with your 1st finger, and the 2nd string with your 4th finger. If your pinky is not up to par with your other fingers, now is a gre...

19: Guitar Tricks 181 Mixing Major & Minor Blues

  • Focus: Channel
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Neal shares his soloing tricks to mix major and minor notes within a blues lead. This tasty lick is in the key of E minor. You can get an extra bluesy flavor to your tone by setting your pickup selector to the neck position here. This lick grabs the listener's attention and is a lot of fun to play and it works well with rock or blues. Tip of the week: how to get more dexterity in your fingers



20: Lady Picture Show: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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One thing that makes Dean Deleo stand out as a guitar player is his very characteristic tone. He always has an array of tones and sounds that are all very different. We're starting out with our main guitar, which today is a Telecaster running through something like a VOX AC15 or AC30. It's a pretty specific tone for this song and you're not going to want a lot of bass. There's plenty of tube overdrive and some really nice and djangly high end, but try to really hone in on where the low end is. You def don't want to start stepping on the bass guitar frequencies, because a...

21: Good Music On My Radio: Verses

  • Focus: Song
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Here we have the classic form, the 12 bar blues. This works out to 3 lines, each with 4 bars. There are some interesting divisions within the bar, and we'll take a look at it one line at a time. Notice how I throw in the move up a half-step to A#7 (or Bb7) to give it a great jazz/blues feel (remember how I told you that you could use that 7th chord shape in many ways all over the neck).



22: Dancin' And Prancin': Guitar 1 Verse Fills

  • Focus: Song
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Guitar 1 plays sparse and simple fills in between the vocal phrases of the verse, using double stops and triads. No single note melodies here, denoting a sophisticated choice by the guitarist! Dig in and have some fun with the slides down the neck. Note the triads spell out D6 and A6 extended chords, reinforcing the jazzy flavor of the tune. Look out for an additional lick using double stops that take us into the second bridge section.

23: Back in the U.S.S.R.: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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For the tones here, I'm using a Telecaster with single coil pickups. For the two rhythm guitars I'll be in the neck position, and for the lead I'm going to switch over to the bridge position pickup. This will give the lead tone a bit more bite. We're going for an overdriven tube amp sound for the rhythm guitars; we'll be using a pretty full sound for these two guitars. I have the bass set to about 5.5, the mids are around 6, and the treble is at 4.5. The overdrive is set so that it breaks up nicely when you hit the boogie rhythms and the bigger chords. For the lead g...

24: Day Tripper: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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Today we'll dial in a little bit of a different tone on each guitar. Some of them have bigger differences than others and we're definitely going for a "retro" sound: that good old British 60s sound where the guitars are really punchy and almost break up into overdrive. Guitar 1 which will play the main riff will be played on a hollow body guitar with P-90 pickups, and I'll be on the bridge position pickup. For the amp I'm actually dialing in a pretty unlikely setting to get the right tone. I rolled off all the bass, the mids are at 3.5, and the treble is set to 5. I also...

25: Drive My Car: Gear & Tone

  • Focus: Song
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We're going to use 2 different tones today, one for the rhythm guitar and one for the lead guitar. The rhythm guitar is a very lightly overdriven tone; I'm using a Danelectro with single coil pickups, and I'm on the neck position to get the right tone. If you don't have a single coil pickup in your guitar, a humbucker will still do the job. For the amp you should be thinking old Fender or Vox. It's really about that old school tube sound that was so prominent in England during the 60s. I have the bass set to 3.5, the mids are at 5, and the treble is set to about 6.5. ...

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