Guitar Lessons:
Guitar Tricks
Username:     Password:
Guitar Lessons (855) EZ-GUITAR




Go Back   Guitar Tricks Forum > Open Community ( Visitors Welcome ) > Gear Reviews
User Name
Password


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #22  
Old 03-19-2014, 11:31 AM
fretsmith fretsmith is offline
Full Access
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 117
fretsmith has made some friends around here
Hey Gang - A ten day biker rally just finished up in my area which features a lot of live music. You can listen to 5-6+ bands a day without hardly moving. I always like to assess what gear these full-time working bands choose. Things have changed some over the last several years.

Gibson ( LP in particular ) are far away the most common seen. That's not a new trend but {I think} the gap is widening. And there not " shiny -new" Pauls either ... OLD Gibsons are, apparently, the guitar du jour. What I've seen change is the increased presence of PRS. All respect to Fender ( I'm sure they make/sell a lot more guitars than PRS?), they are not as well represented as they used to be. And what used to be a 80/20 mix - strats to teles- appears closer to 50/50 now. I wasn't counting, these are abstract observations made under the influence of copius amounts of alcohol. That clarified, Gibson / PRS / Fender (in that order) represented 80%+ of all the electric guitars I saw being used. Acoustic guitars are harder to identify from a distance- it's hard to read headstocks with blurred vision. .... ( I wonder if it's a different story at the CMF in Nashville? Would PRS outnumber Fender there? Probably not? )

Amps were a different story ... aside from the obvious heavy load of Marshall I saw every brand / set-up imaginable. I didn't hear one single set-up I'd call "weak".

Anyway... since your thread was specifically about Gibson vs. PRS I thot I'd chime-in that PRS has done a pretty effective job of clawing it's way toward the top amongst the " working crowd ". Personally, I like'm both.

Good Luck- neither would be a "mistake" .....
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-19-2014, 12:01 PM
maggior maggior is online now
Full Access
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 794
maggior has made some friends around here
Sounds like you had a ton of fun listening to a lot of live music recently!!

That's really interesting to hear that the percentage of fenders, particularly strats seems to be waning.

PRS is definitely making some strides. Being a happy medium between the strat and the LP, I can see how they would appeal to the working guitarist. I hadn't listened to or read about Al DiMeola in a long time, and discovered that he's a PRS guy now. I think he even has a signature model. I always remembered him with that cool ebony LP!!

I can't wait until I can go out and get my hands on some PRS models and see what I think, especially compared to my strat and an lp studio.
__________________
--------
Rich
Gear: 2000 American Standard Stratocaster, 2011 Faded Les Paul Studio, 2014 PRS Custom 24 S2, 2001 Seagull S6 Acoustic, Peavey ValveKing 112 amp, Zoom G5
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-19-2014, 08:18 PM
john of MT john of MT is offline
Full Access
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: western Montana
Posts: 455
john of MT has made some friends around here
A PRS employee told me 'they' consider Gibson their biggest competitor and I think he was speaking in terms of quality.

On the PRS web site (and else where on the web) there are some interesting videos about PRS's philosophy, design/manufacturing concepts, their quality control and, of course, new models. And then there are their amps...

As for Al DiMeola, he's got a signature-model Ovation out there too.
__________________
"It takes a lot of devotion and work, or maybe I should say play, because if you love it, that's what it amounts to. I haven't found any shortcuts, and I've been looking for a long time."
-- Chet Atkins
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-20-2014, 05:54 PM
axe2's Avatar
axe2 axe2 is online now
Full Access
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 456
axe2 has made some friends around here
Quote:
Originally Posted by maggior
Sounds like you had a ton of fun listening to a lot of live music recently!!

That's really interesting to hear that the percentage of fenders, particularly strats seems to be waning.

PRS is definitely making some strides. Being a happy medium between the strat and the LP, I can see how they would appeal to the working guitarist. I hadn't listened to or read about Al DiMeola in a long time, and discovered that he's a PRS guy now. I think he even has a signature model. I always remembered him with that cool ebony LP!!

I can't wait until I can go out and get my hands on some PRS models and see what I think, especially compared to my strat and an lp studio.
try out some usa prs u will feel the difference.but u will allso feel the difference in the wallet.great investments.

Last edited by axe2 : 03-20-2014 at 06:02 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 04-11-2014, 02:29 PM
aschleman aschleman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Lafayette, Indiana
Posts: 2,022
aschleman gives straight goods, first time, every timeaschleman gives straight goods, first time, every timeaschleman gives straight goods, first time, every time
Send a message via AIM to aschleman Send a message via MSN to aschleman
PRS for the longest time was considered to be more of a smaller manufacturer and more boutique in comparison to the already established brand of Gibson. Only in the recent decades have they began making guitars that are more accessibly priced for anyone who is not an avid collector or professional player. This accounts for the boom in the PRS market and their now very noticeable presence as a competitor to Gibson. They are seen as such because the two build guitars with very similar philosophies. The formula for a Les Paul is the same as the formula for a PRS Custom 21/22. Set neck, mahogany body, flamed or quilted maple top, ebony fretboard, dual humbuckers, two volume, two tone, three way switch, stop tail piece with tune o matic bridge. PRS gained its following because it actually did Gibson better than Gibson did Gibson in the late 80's. A similar story is the coming of age of Taylor acoustic guitars in regards to how they started as a boutique company and by way of high quality instruments have become a very large player in not only the high dollar instrumnets but also the 500-1000 dollar instruments.

As for Fender, there still isn't a guitar manufacturer that could do Fender better than Fender can do Fender. And there probably never will.
__________________
Expect all your life to be let down, and to say goodbye to friends you've found... Becuase we both will have to leave this town, for better lives.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old Today, 09:06 AM
maggior maggior is online now
Full Access
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 794
maggior has made some friends around here
Now a PRS Owner

The Fed Ex man delivered my new Custom 24 S2 PRS yesterday in Black Cherry.

I'm so glad I ordered this from Sweetwater rathern than buying the manhandled one at Guitar Center. I'm blown away at the craftsmanship of this guitar...and this isn't even a high end one!! It's a beauty to look at and a pleasure to hold in your hands. The fretword is the best that I've ever seen. Action is rediculously low, intonation dead on, setup is just fantastic right out of the box. The sustain is as good as my les paul despite having a trem bridge. That shocked me.

Despite having a trem bridge, it holds tuning better than both my lp and my strat. Even after 1.5 hours of playing blues riffs and various songs, it was still in tune!

I have to admit that initially I was dissapointed at the tone. I got that same impression of lifeless tone I got from various youtube videos. However, I started messing with the pickup selector and using the coil tap and it grew on me. Then I plugged it into my Zoom G5 pedal and was amazed at what it would do with the various amp simulations. With a Vox amp simulation, I was blown away by the vintage Beatles tone I got! This guitar works much better with my Zoom G5 than either my strat or lp. Don't know why...

I think the problem is that I have only ever played strats and lps and I'm used to hearing those tones. The more I played it, the more I warmed up to it.

On my LP, I only use my bridge pickup - the neck is too muddy for my taste. On my strat, I use my neck pickup only - the others are too twangy or gritty for me. On this guitar, I find both pickups are appealing...and the coil tap adds even more variation. If I want a less refined gritty sound, the coil tap does the trick. This is no one-trick-pony!

24 frets will take some getting used to but hasn't caused a major problem. It's nice to play on the 7th and 9th frets and still feel like you are at the top of the neck! Even though the scale length is shorter than my strat, I felt like I had to reach farther...probably because of how the neck is attached to the body. It seems like an SG in that regard - you have clear access to every single fret up to the last one! Dropping the guitar lower and holding it at more of an angle pretty much took care of that, so no biggie. Probably looks cooler that way anyway :-).

So, I'm happy so far. I'm looking forward to playing this guitar over the next few weeks getting used to the new feel and exploring the tonal possibilities.
__________________
--------
Rich
Gear: 2000 American Standard Stratocaster, 2011 Faded Les Paul Studio, 2014 PRS Custom 24 S2, 2001 Seagull S6 Acoustic, Peavey ValveKing 112 amp, Zoom G5
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:56 AM.


Powered by: vBulletin® Version 3.0.17
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Guitar Lessons Learn Guitar
© Copyright 1998-2014 GuitarTricks. All rights reserved.


Learn Guitar Online